182

I need to go through a set and remove elements that meet a predefined criteria.

This is the test code I wrote:

#include <set>
#include <algorithm>

void printElement(int value) {
    std::cout << value << " ";
}

int main() {
    int initNum[] = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };
    std::set<int> numbers(initNum, initNum + 10);
    // print '0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9'
    std::for_each(numbers.begin(), numbers.end(), printElement);

    std::set<int>::iterator it = numbers.begin();

    // iterate through the set and erase all even numbers
    for (; it != numbers.end(); ++it) {
        int n = *it;
        if (n % 2 == 0) {
            // wouldn't invalidate the iterator?
            numbers.erase(it);
        }
    }

    // print '1 3 5 7 9'
    std::for_each(numbers.begin(), numbers.end(), printElement);

    return 0;
}

At first, I thought that erasing an element from the set while iterating through it would invalidate the iterator, and the increment at the for loop would have undefined behavior. Even though, I executed this test code and all went well, and I can't explain why.

My question: Is this the defined behavior for std sets or is this implementation specific? I am using gcc 4.3.3 on ubuntu 10.04 (32-bit version), by the way.

Thanks!

Proposed solution:

Is this a correct way to iterate and erase elements from the set?

while(it != numbers.end()) {
    int n = *it;
    if (n % 2 == 0) {
        // post-increment operator returns a copy, then increment
        numbers.erase(it++);
    } else {
        // pre-increment operator increments, then return
        ++it;
    }
}

Edit: PREFERED SOLUTION

I came around a solution that seems more elegant to me, even though it does exactly the same.

while(it != numbers.end()) {
    // copy the current iterator then increment it
    std::set<int>::iterator current = it++;
    int n = *current;
    if (n % 2 == 0) {
        // don't invalidate iterator it, because it is already
        // pointing to the next element
        numbers.erase(current);
    }
}

If there are several test conditions inside the while, each one of them must increment the iterator. I like this code better because the iterator is incremented only in one place, making the code less error-prone and more readable.

9
  • 1
    Asked and answered: stackoverflow.com/questions/263945/… May 20, 2010 at 16:00
  • 3
    Actually, I read this question (and others) before asking mine, but since they were related to other STL containers and since my initial test apparently worked, I thought there was some difference between them. Only after Matt's answer I thought of using valgrind. Even though, I prefer my NEW solution over the others because it reduces the chances of errors by incrementing the iterator in only one place. Thank you all for the help! Jul 6, 2010 at 18:58
  • 1
    @pedromanoel ++it should be somewhat more efficient than it++ because it doesn't require the use of an invisible temporary copy of the iterator. Kornel's version whilst longer ensures that the non-filtered elements are iterated over most efficiently.
    – Alnitak
    Oct 22, 2012 at 16:23
  • @Alnitak I haven't thought about that, but I think that the difference in performance wouldn't be so great. The copy is created in his version too, but only for the elements that match. So the degree of optimization is totally dependent on the structure of the set. For quite some time I pre-optimized code, hurting readability and coding speed in the process... So I would perform some tests before using the other way. Oct 22, 2012 at 19:24
  • 1
    possible duplicate of Can you remove elements from a std::list while iterating through it?
    – bobobobo
    Dec 9, 2012 at 20:46

8 Answers 8

219

This is implementation dependent:

Standard 23.1.2.8:

The insert members shall not affect the validity of iterators and references to the container, and the erase members shall invalidate only iterators and references to the erased elements.

Maybe you could try this -- this is standard conforming:

for (auto it = numbers.begin(); it != numbers.end(); ) {
    if (*it % 2 == 0) {
        numbers.erase(it++);
    }
    else {
        ++it;
    }
}

Note that it++ is postfix, hence it passes the old position to erase, but first jumps to a newer one due to the operator.

2015.10.27 update: C++11 has resolved the defect. iterator erase (const_iterator position); return an iterator to the element that follows the last element removed (or set::end, if the last element was removed). So C++11 style is:

for (auto it = numbers.begin(); it != numbers.end(); ) {
    if (*it % 2 == 0) {
        it = numbers.erase(it);
    }
    else {
        ++it;
    }
}
4
  • 3
    This does not work with deque on MSVC2013. Either their implementation is buggy or there is yet another requirement that prevents this from working on deque. The STL spec is so convoluted that you can't expect all implementations to follow it, let alone your casual programmer to memorize it. STL is a monster beyond taming, and since there is no unique implementation (and test suites, if any, apparently do not cover such obvious cases as deleting elements in a loop), that makes the STL a shiny brittle toy that can go up with a bang when you look at it sideways.
    – kuroi neko
    Jan 29, 2015 at 22:01
  • @MatthieuM. It does in C++11. In C++17, it takes iterator (const_iterator in C++11) now. Jan 23, 2018 at 4:15
  • @kuroineko this would not work on deque because erase invalidate all iterator Jul 14, 2021 at 7:53
  • (referring to 1st snippet, judge by history order) Jul 14, 2021 at 8:04
22

If you run your program through valgrind, you'll see a bunch of read errors. In other words, yes, the iterators are being invalidated, but you're getting lucky in your example (or really unlucky, as you're not seeing the negative effects of undefined behavior). One solution to this is to create a temporary iterator, increment the temp, delete the target iterator, then set the target to the temp. For example, re-write your loop as follows:

std::set<int>::iterator it = numbers.begin();                               
std::set<int>::iterator tmp;                                                

// iterate through the set and erase all even numbers                       
for ( ; it != numbers.end(); )                                              
{                                                                           
    int n = *it;                                                            
    if (n % 2 == 0)                                                         
    {                                                                       
        tmp = it;                                                           
        ++tmp;                                                              
        numbers.erase(it);                                                  
        it = tmp;                                                           
    }                                                                       
    else                                                                    
    {                                                                       
        ++it;                                                               
    }                                                                       
} 
1
  • If it's only condition which matters & doesn't require in-scope initialization or post-operation, then better to use while loop. i.e. for ( ; it != numbers.end(); ) is better visible with while (it != numbers.end())
    – iammilind
    Apr 28, 2018 at 6:26
8

You misunderstand what "undefined behavior" means. Undefined behavior does not mean "if you do this, your program will crash or produce unexpected results." It means "if you do this, your program could crash or produce unexpected results", or do anything else, depending on your compiler, your operating system, the phase of the moon, etc.

If something executes without crashing and behaves as you expect it to, that is not proof that it is not undefined behavior. All it proves is that its behavior happened to be as observed for that particular run after compiling with that particular compiler on that particular operating system.

Erasing an element from a set invalidates the iterator to the erased element. Using an invalidated iterator is undefined behavior. It just so happened that the observed behavior was what you intended in this particular instance; it does not mean that the code is correct.

3
  • Oh, I am well aware that undefined behavior can also mean "It works for me, but not for everybody". That is why I asked this question, because I didn't know if this behavior was correct or not. If it was, than I would just leave like that. Using an while loop would solve my problem, then? I edited my question with my proposed solution. Please check it out. May 20, 2010 at 14:22
  • It works for me too. But when I change the condition into if (n > 2 && n < 7 ) then I get 0 1 2 4 7 8 9. - The particular result here probably depends more on the implementation details of the erase method and set iterators, rather than on the phase of the moon (not that one should ever rely on implementation details). ;)
    – UncleBens
    May 20, 2010 at 14:58
  • 2
    STL adds a lot of new meanings to "undefined behaviour". For instance "Microsoft thought smart to enhance the spec by allowing std::set::erase to return an iterator, so your MSVC code will go up with a bang when compiled by gcc", or "Microsoft does bound checks on std::bitset::operator[] so your carefully optimized bitset algorithm will slow to a crawl when compiled with MSVC". STL has no unique implementation and its spec is an exponentially growing bloated mess, so no wonder deleting elements from inside a loop requires senior programmer expertise...
    – kuroi neko
    Jan 29, 2015 at 22:16
6

C++20 will have "uniform container erasure", and you'll be able to write:

std::erase_if(numbers, [](int n){ return n % 2 == 0 });

And that will work for vector, set, deque, etc. See cppReference for more info.

2

Just to warn, that in case of a deque container, all solutions that check for the deque iterator equality to numbers.end() will likely fail on gcc 4.8.4. Namely, erasing an element of the deque generally invalidates pointer to numbers.end():

#include <iostream>
#include <deque>

using namespace std;
int main() 
{

  deque<int> numbers;

  numbers.push_back(0);
  numbers.push_back(1);
  numbers.push_back(2);
  numbers.push_back(3);
  //numbers.push_back(4);

  deque<int>::iterator  it_end = numbers.end();

  for (deque<int>::iterator it = numbers.begin(); it != numbers.end(); ) {
    if (*it % 2 == 0) {
      cout << "Erasing element: " << *it << "\n";
      numbers.erase(it++);
      if (it_end == numbers.end()) {
    cout << "it_end is still pointing to numbers.end()\n";
      } else {
    cout << "it_end is not anymore pointing to numbers.end()\n";
      }
    }
    else {
      cout << "Skipping element: " << *it << "\n";
      ++it;
    }
  }
}

Output:

Erasing element: 0
it_end is still pointing to numbers.end()
Skipping element: 1
Erasing element: 2
it_end is not anymore pointing to numbers.end()

Note that while the deque transformation is correct in this particular case, the end pointer has been invalidated along the way. With the deque of a different size the error is more apparent:

int main() 
{

  deque<int> numbers;

  numbers.push_back(0);
  numbers.push_back(1);
  numbers.push_back(2);
  numbers.push_back(3);
  numbers.push_back(4);

  deque<int>::iterator  it_end = numbers.end();

  for (deque<int>::iterator it = numbers.begin(); it != numbers.end(); ) {
    if (*it % 2 == 0) {
      cout << "Erasing element: " << *it << "\n";
      numbers.erase(it++);
      if (it_end == numbers.end()) {
    cout << "it_end is still pointing to numbers.end()\n";
      } else {
    cout << "it_end is not anymore pointing to numbers.end()\n";
      }
    }
    else {
      cout << "Skipping element: " << *it << "\n";
      ++it;
    }
  }
}

Output:

Erasing element: 0
it_end is still pointing to numbers.end()
Skipping element: 1
Erasing element: 2
it_end is still pointing to numbers.end()
Skipping element: 3
Erasing element: 4
it_end is not anymore pointing to numbers.end()
Erasing element: 0
it_end is not anymore pointing to numbers.end()
Erasing element: 0
it_end is not anymore pointing to numbers.end()
...
Segmentation fault (core dumped)

Here is one of the ways to fix this:

#include <iostream>
#include <deque>

using namespace std;
int main() 
{

  deque<int> numbers;
  bool done_iterating = false;

  numbers.push_back(0);
  numbers.push_back(1);
  numbers.push_back(2);
  numbers.push_back(3);
  numbers.push_back(4);

  if (!numbers.empty()) {
    deque<int>::iterator it = numbers.begin();
    while (!done_iterating) {
      if (it + 1 == numbers.end()) {
    done_iterating = true;
      } 
      if (*it % 2 == 0) {
    cout << "Erasing element: " << *it << "\n";
      numbers.erase(it++);
      }
      else {
    cout << "Skipping element: " << *it << "\n";
    ++it;
      }
    }
  }
}
1
  • The key being do not trust an old remembered dq.end() value, always compare to a new call to dq.end(). Apr 24, 2019 at 21:42
1

This behaviour is implementation specific. To guarantee the correctness of the iterator you should use "it = numbers.erase(it);" statement if you need to delete the element and simply incerement iterator in other case.

4
  • 1
    Set<T>::erase version doesn't return iterator. May 20, 2010 at 14:12
  • 4
    Actually it does, but only on MSVC implementation. So this is truly an implementation specific answer. :)
    – Eugene
    Sep 24, 2012 at 21:00
  • 1
    @Eugene It does it for all implementations with C++11
    – mastov
    Aug 22, 2017 at 11:00
  • Some implementation of gcc 4.8 with c++1y have a bug in erase. it = collection.erase(it); is supposed to work, but it may be safer to use collection.erase(it++); Apr 24, 2019 at 21:44
1

I think using the STL method 'remove_if' from could help to prevent some weird issue when trying to attempt to delete the object that is wrapped by the iterator.

This solution may be less efficient.

Let's say we have some kind of container, like vector or a list called m_bullets:

Bullet::Ptr is a shared_pr<Bullet>

'it' is the iterator that 'remove_if' returns, the third argument is a lambda function that is executed on every element of the container. Because the container contains Bullet::Ptr, the lambda function needs to get that type(or a reference to that type) passed as an argument.

 auto it = std::remove_if(m_bullets.begin(), m_bullets.end(), [](Bullet::Ptr bullet){
    // dead bullets need to be removed from the container
    if (!bullet->isAlive()) {
        // lambda function returns true, thus this element is 'removed'
        return true;
    }
    else{
        // in the other case, that the bullet is still alive and we can do
        // stuff with it, like rendering and what not.
        bullet->render(); // while checking, we do render work at the same time
        // then we could either do another check or directly say that we don't
        // want the bullet to be removed.
        return false;
    }
});
// The interesting part is, that all of those objects were not really
// completely removed, as the space of the deleted objects does still 
// exist and needs to be removed if you do not want to manually fill it later 
// on with any other objects.
// erase dead bullets
m_bullets.erase(it, m_bullets.end());

'remove_if' removes the container where the lambda function returned true and shifts that content to the beginning of the container. The 'it' points to an undefined object that can be considered garbage. Objects from 'it' to m_bullets.end() can be erased, as they occupy memory, but contain garbage, thus the 'erase' method is called on that range.

0

I came across same old issue and found below code more understandable which is in a way per above solutions.

std::set<int*>::iterator beginIt = listOfInts.begin();
while(beginIt != listOfInts.end())
{
    // Use your member
    std::cout<<(*beginIt)<<std::endl;

    // delete the object
    delete (*beginIt);

    // erase item from vector
    listOfInts.erase(beginIt );

    // re-calculate the begin
    beginIt = listOfInts.begin();
}
1
  • This only works if you will always erase every item. The OP is about selectively erasing the items and still having valid iterators. Apr 24, 2019 at 21:46

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