-5

I know this is a recursive function that returns the number of ways to represent a number n as the sum of the numbers which are not greater than k, in order, but I can't understand how it's done.

def all_sums(n, k):

    if n == 0:
        return 1
    elif n < 0: 
        return 0
    else:
        res = 0
        for i in range(1, k+1):
            res = res + all_sums(n-i, k)
        return res
1
  • 2
    Why don't you use pdb or add some print statements to watch things change? This is a very basic recursion and you probably just need to read more about recursion in general. Feb 26, 2015 at 20:31

1 Answer 1

5

First, you should know that this function is recursive. Basically what that means is that the code calls itself, with different numbers. A good example of recursion is the fibbonacci sequence, which adds the two previous numbers in the sequence together to get the next number. The code for that would be :

def F(n):
    if n == 0:
        return 0 #base case no.1 because there are no previous elements to add together.
    elif n == 1:
        return 1 #base case no.2 because there are not enough previous elements to add together.
    else:
        return F(n-1)+F(n-2) #adds together the result of whatever the last number in the sequence was to whatever the number before that was.

Once you understands how recursion works, you can simply trace through the code. If this is hard to do mentally, try drawing it out on a piece of paper. I find that this can be a helpful strategy in general when programming anything. I always keep a pad of paper and a pencil nearby my computer for this reason. Let's do a quick run-down of the code together, just to get the general idea of what's happening:

def all_sums(n,k):

Here, we are defining the method, and passing to arguments, n and k to it.

if n == 0:
    return 1

This is a "base case" for the recursive function, essentially there to make sure that the code won't run forever, and to close up the function.

elif n < 0:
    return 0

This shows that if n is less than 0, return 0 (because n can't be negative). This is considered a "special case" to prevent someone from accidentally screwing up the program.

else:
    res = 0

If none of the other "special cases" happen, do all the following. First, we set a variable equal to 0.

for i in range(1, k+1):
    res = res + all_sums(n-i, k)

calls a for loop that starts at 1 and goes through each integer up to (but not including) k+1. For each iteration, it sets our res variable to whatever res was before plus the result of calling the same function, using n-i as the first variable.

return res

this code simply outputs whatever the result is for res after the for loop completes.

If you want to see how the code works, add print statements to various parts of the code and watch what it outputs. Also, you may want to read up on recursion a bit, if this confuses you at all.

EDIT

Here is a basic run through of all_sums(3,3), using pseudo-code. First, however, here is your code with a few comments and print statements added (this was the code I ran in a file called "test.py":

def all_sums(n, k):

    if n == 0: #base case 1
        return 1
    elif n < 0: #base case 2
        return 0
    else: #recursive case
        res = 0
        for i in range(1, k+1):
            res = res + all_sums(n-i, k)
        print res #output res to the screen
        return res

print all_sums(3,3)

And here is my trace of the code. Note that every time you go down a level, res is a different variable due to the scope of the variable. Every time I tab in, is when I'm running the code inside a new call to the function.

all_sums(3,3):
    res = 0
    0 + all_sums((3-1),3)
        res = 0
        0 + all_sums((2-1),3)
            res = 0
            0 + all_sums((1-1),3)
                returning 1 #first base case
            1 + all_sums((1-2),3)
                returning 0 #second base case
            1 + all_sums((1-3),3)
                returning 0 #second base case
            PRINTING 1 TO THE SCREEN
            returning 1 #end of recursive case
        1 + all_sums((2-2),3)
            returning 1 #first base case
        2 + all_sums((2-3),3)
            returning 0 #second base case
        PRINTING 2 TO THE SCREEN
        returning 2 #end of recursive case
    2 + all_sums((3-2),3)
        res = 0
        0 + all_sums((1-1),3)
            returning 1 #first base case
        1 + all_sums((1-2),3)
            returning 0 #second base case
        1 + all_sums((1-3),3)
            returning 0 #second base case
        PRINTING 1 TO THE SCREEN
        returning 1 #end of recursive case
    3 + all_sums((3-3),3)
        returning 1 #first base case
    PRINTING 4 TO THE SCREEN
    returning 4 #end of recursive
returning 4 #end of recursive case (and your original function call)

PRINTING 4 TO THE SCREEN AS THE RESULT OF all_sums(3,3)
3
  • Thank you. Can you show me the steps please just step by step, I start to get in trouble when I get to 0 then went to 'for'
    – gvd
    Feb 28, 2015 at 17:43
  • I added in a trace to a call to all_sums(3,3). Does this help clear things up a little? Mar 1, 2015 at 5:01
  • No problem. Don't forget to check the problem as "solved" if this is the answer you are looking for. Good luck on your endeavors! Mar 1, 2015 at 17:14

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