Recently began branching out from my safe place (R) into Python and and am a bit confused by the cell localization/selection in Pandas. I've read the documentation but I'm struggling to understand the practical implications of the various localization/selection options.

  • Is there a reason why I should ever use .loc or .iloc over the most general option .ix?
  • I understand that .loc, iloc, at, and iat may provide some guaranteed correctness that .ix can't offer, but I've also read where .ix tends to be the fastest solution across the board.
  • Please explain the real-world, best-practices reasoning behind utilizing anything other than .ix?
  • 2
    check out stackoverflow.com/questions/27667759/… – cphlewis Feb 27 '15 at 8:11
  • 1
    loc is label based indexing so basically looking up a value in a row, iloc is integer row based indexing, ix is a general method that first performs label based, if that fails then it falls to integer based. at is deprecated and it's advised you don't use that anymore. The other thing to consider is what you are trying to do as some of these methods allow slicing, and column assignment, to be honest the docs are pretty clear: pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/indexing.html – EdChum Feb 27 '15 at 8:33
  • @EdChum - what makes you say that at is deprecated? I don't see it in the at (or iat) docs. – Russ Jun 20 '15 at 5:09
  • That's an error it's not deprecated, I think there was some talk of deprecating it but this idea was dropped because I think it's faster – EdChum Jun 20 '15 at 5:29
  • 3
    Detail explanation between loc, ix and iloc here: stackoverflow.com/questions/31593201/… – Alex Riley Jul 31 '15 at 10:33

loc: only work on index
iloc: work on position
ix: You can get data from dataframe without it being in the index
at: get scalar values. It's a very fast loc
iat: Get scalar values. It's a very fast iloc

http://pyciencia.blogspot.com/2015/05/obtener-y-filtrar-datos-de-un-dataframe.html

Note: As of pandas 0.20.0, the .ix indexer is deprecated in favour of the more strict .iloc and .loc indexers.

  • 4
    If at and iat are very fast versions of loc and iloc, then why use loc and iloc at all? – Ray Sep 28 '16 at 9:51
  • 30
    atand iat a meant to access a scalar, that is, a single element in the dataframe, while loc and ilocare ments to access several elements at the same time, potentially to perform vectorized operations. – ncasas Oct 7 '16 at 9:24

Updated for pandas 0.20 given that ix is deprecated. This demonstrates not only how to use loc, iloc, at, iat, set_value, but how to accomplish, mixed positional/label based indexing.


loc - label based
Allows you to pass 1-D arrays as indexers. Arrays can be either slices (subsets) of the index or column, or they can be boolean arrays which are equal in length to the index or columns.

Special Note: when a scalar indexer is passed, loc can assign a new index or column value that didn't exist before.

# label based, but we can use position values
# to get the labels from the index object
df.loc[df.index[2], 'ColName'] = 3

df.loc[df.index[1:3], 'ColName'] = 3

iloc - position based
Similar to loc except with positions rather that index values. However, you cannot assign new columns or indices.

# position based, but we can get the position
# from the columns object via the `get_loc` method
df.iloc[2, df.columns.get_loc('ColName')] = 3

df.iloc[2, 4] = 3

df.iloc[:3, 2:4] = 3

at - label based
Works very similar to loc for scalar indexers. Cannot operate on array indexers. Can! assign new indices and columns.

Advantage over loc is that this is faster.
Disadvantage is that you can't use arrays for indexers.

# label based, but we can use position values
# to get the labels from the index object
df.at[df.index[2], 'ColName'] = 3

df.at['C', 'ColName'] = 3

iat - position based
Works similarly to iloc. Cannot work in array indexers. Cannot! assign new indices and columns.

Advantage over iloc is that this is faster.
Disadvantage is that you can't use arrays for indexers.

# position based, but we can get the position
# from the columns object via the `get_loc` method
IBM.iat[2, IBM.columns.get_loc('PNL')] = 3

set_value - label based
Works very similar to loc for scalar indexers. Cannot operate on array indexers. Can! assign new indices and columns

Advantage Super fast, because there is very little overhead!
Disadvantage There is very little overhead because pandas is not doing a bunch of safety checks. Use at your own risk. Also, this is not intended for public use.

# label based, but we can use position values
# to get the labels from the index object
df.set_value(df.index[2], 'ColName', 3)

set_value with takable=True - position based
Works similarly to iloc. Cannot work in array indexers. Cannot! assign new indices and columns.

Advantage Super fast, because there is very little overhead!
Disadvantage There is very little overhead because pandas is not doing a bunch of safety checks. Use at your own risk. Also, this is not intended for public use.

# position based, but we can get the position
# from the columns object via the `get_loc` method
df.set_value(2, df.columns.get_loc('ColName'), 3, takable=True)
  • So, is there a simple way to read/set multiple columns by position? Further, say, I wanted to add an array of values each into new columns, is this easily done? – wordsmith May 15 '17 at 8:34
  • @wordsmith there are easy ish ways to append new columns to the end of the dataframe. Or even the beginning. If the positions are involved then no, there isn't an easy way. – piRSquared Jun 21 '17 at 17:42
  • This answer was just what I needed! Pandas is certainly powerful, but that comes at the expense of making everything extremely complicated to understand and piece together. – slhck Feb 7 at 16:48
df = pd.DataFrame({'A':['a', 'b', 'c'], 'B':[54, 67, 89]}, index=[100, 200, 300])

df

                        A   B
                100     a   54
                200     b   67
                300     c   89
In [19]:    
df.loc[100]

Out[19]:
A     a
B    54
Name: 100, dtype: object

In [20]:    
df.iloc[0]

Out[20]:
A     a
B    54
Name: 100, dtype: object

In [24]:    
df2 = df.set_index([df.index,'A'])
df2

Out[24]:
        B
    A   
100 a   54
200 b   67
300 c   89

In [25]:    
df2.ix[100, 'a']

Out[25]:    
B    54
Name: (100, a), dtype: int64

There are two primary ways that pandas makes selections from a DataFrame.

  • By Label
  • By Integer Location

The documentation uses the term position for referring to integer location. I do not like this terminology as I feel it is confusing. Integer location is more descriptive and is exactly what .iloc stands for. The key word here is INTEGER - you must use integers when selecting by integer location.

Before showing the summary let's all make sure that ...

.ix is deprecated and ambiguous and should never be used

There are three primary indexers for pandas. We have the indexing operator itself (the brackets []), .loc, and .iloc. Let's summarize them:

  • [] - Primarily selects subsets of columns, but can select rows as well. Cannot simultaneously select rows and columns.
  • .loc - selects subsets of rows and columns by label only
  • .iloc - selects subsets of rows and columns by integer location only

I almost never use .at or .iat as they add no additional functionality and with just a small performance increase. I would discourage their use unless you have a very time-sensitive application. Regardless, we have their summary:

  • .at selects a single scalar value in the DataFrame by label only
  • .iat selects a single scalar value in the DataFrame by integer location only

In addition to selection by label and integer location, boolean selection also known as boolean indexing exists.


Examples explaining .loc, .iloc, boolean selection and .at and .iat are shown below

We will first focus on the differences between .loc and .iloc. Before we talk about the differences, it is important to understand that DataFrames have labels that help identify each column and each row. Let's take a look at a sample DataFrame:

df = pd.DataFrame({'age':[30, 2, 12, 4, 32, 33, 69],
                   'color':['blue', 'green', 'red', 'white', 'gray', 'black', 'red'],
                   'food':['Steak', 'Lamb', 'Mango', 'Apple', 'Cheese', 'Melon', 'Beans'],
                   'height':[165, 70, 120, 80, 180, 172, 150],
                   'score':[4.6, 8.3, 9.0, 3.3, 1.8, 9.5, 2.2],
                   'state':['NY', 'TX', 'FL', 'AL', 'AK', 'TX', 'TX']
                   },
                  index=['Jane', 'Nick', 'Aaron', 'Penelope', 'Dean', 'Christina', 'Cornelia'])

enter image description here

All the words in bold are the labels. The labels, age, color, food, height, score and state are used for the columns. The other labels, Jane, Nick, Aaron, Penelope, Dean, Christina, Cornelia are used as labels for the rows. Collectively, these row labels are known as the index.


The primary ways to select particular rows in a DataFrame are with the .loc and .iloc indexers. Each of these indexers can also be used to simultaneously select columns but it is easier to just focus on rows for now. Also, each of the indexers use a set of brackets that immediately follow their name to make their selections.

.loc selects data only by labels

We will first talk about the .loc indexer which only selects data by the index or column labels. In our sample DataFrame, we have provided meaningful names as values for the index. Many DataFrames will not have any meaningful names and will instead, default to just the integers from 0 to n-1, where n is the length of the DataFrame.

There are three different inputs you can use for .loc

  • A string
  • A list of strings
  • Slice notation using strings as the start and stop values

Selecting a single row with .loc with a string

To select a single row of data, place the index label inside of the brackets following .loc.

df.loc['Penelope']

This returns the row of data as a Series

age           4
color     white
food      Apple
height       80
score       3.3
state        AL
Name: Penelope, dtype: object

Selecting multiple rows with .loc with a list of strings

df.loc[['Cornelia', 'Jane', 'Dean']]

This returns a DataFrame with the rows in the order specified in the list:

enter image description here

Selecting multiple rows with .loc with slice notation

Slice notation is defined by a start, stop and step values. When slicing by label, pandas includes the stop value in the return. The following slices from Aaron to Dean, inclusive. Its step size is not explicitly defined but defaulted to 1.

df.loc['Aaron':'Dean']

enter image description here

Complex slices can be taken in the same manner as Python lists.

.iloc selects data only by integer location

Let's now turn to .iloc. Every row and column of data in a DataFrame has an integer location that defines it. This is in addition to the label that is visually displayed in the output. The integer location is simply the number of rows/columns from the top/left beginning at 0.

There are three different inputs you can use for .iloc

  • An integer
  • A list of integers
  • Slice notation using integers as the start and stop values

Selecting a single row with .iloc with an integer

df.iloc[4]

This returns the 5th row (integer location 4) as a Series

age           32
color       gray
food      Cheese
height       180
score        1.8
state         AK
Name: Dean, dtype: object

Selecting multiple rows with .iloc with a list of integers

df.iloc[[2, -2]]

This returns a DataFrame of the third and second to last rows:

enter image description here

Selecting multiple rows with .iloc with slice notation

df.iloc[:5:3]

enter image description here


Simultaneous selection of rows and columns with .loc and .iloc

One excellent ability of both .loc/.iloc is their ability to select both rows and columns simultaneously. In the examples above, all the columns were returned from each selection. We can choose columns with the same types of inputs as we do for rows. We simply need to separate the row and column selection with a comma.

For example, we can select rows Jane, and Dean with just the columns height, score and state like this:

df.loc[['Jane', 'Dean'], 'height':]

enter image description here

This uses a list of labels for the rows and slice notation for the columns

We can naturally do similar operations with .iloc using only integers.

df.iloc[[1,4], 2]
Nick      Lamb
Dean    Cheese
Name: food, dtype: object

Simultaneous selection with labels and integer location

.ix was used to make selections simultaneously with labels and integer location which was useful but confusing and ambiguous at times and thankfully it has been deprecated. In the event that you need to make a selection with a mix of labels and integer locations, you will have to make both your selections labels or integer locations.

For instance, if we want to select rows Nick and Cornelia along with columns 2 and 4, we could use .loc by converting the integers to labels with the following:

col_names = df.columns[[2, 4]]
df.loc[['Nick', 'Cornelia'], col_names] 

Or alternatively, convert the index labels to integers with the get_loc index method.

labels = ['Nick', 'Cornelia']
index_ints = [df.index.get_loc(label) for label in labels]
df.iloc[index_ints, [2, 4]]

Boolean Selection

The .loc indexer can also do boolean selection. For instance, if we are interested in finding all the rows wher age is above 30 and return just the food and score columns we can do the following:

df.loc[df['age'] > 30, ['food', 'score']] 

You can replicate this with .iloc but you cannot pass it a boolean series. You must convert the boolean Series into a numpy array like this:

df.iloc[(df['age'] > 30).values, [2, 4]] 

Selecting all rows

It is possible to use .loc/.iloc for just column selection. You can select all the rows by using a colon like this:

df.loc[:, 'color':'score':2]

enter image description here


The indexing operator, [], can slice can select rows and columns too but not simultaneously.

Most people are familiar with the primary purpose of the DataFrame indexing operator, which is to select columns. A string selects a single column as a Series and a list of strings selects multiple columns as a DataFrame.

df['food']

Jane          Steak
Nick           Lamb
Aaron         Mango
Penelope      Apple
Dean         Cheese
Christina     Melon
Cornelia      Beans
Name: food, dtype: object

Using a list selects multiple columns

df[['food', 'score']]

enter image description here

What people are less familiar with, is that, when slice notation is used, then selection happens by row labels or by integer location. This is very confusing and something that I almost never use but it does work.

df['Penelope':'Christina'] # slice rows by label

enter image description here

df[2:6:2] # slice rows by integer location

enter image description here

The explicitness of .loc/.iloc for selecting rows is highly preferred. The indexing operator alone is unable to select rows and columns simultaneously.

df[3:5, 'color']
TypeError: unhashable type: 'slice'

Selection by .at and .iat

Selection with .at is nearly identical to .loc but it only selects a single 'cell' in your DataFrame. We usually refer to this cell as a scalar value. To use .loc, pass it both a row and column label separated by a comma.

df.at['Christina', 'color']
'black'

Selection with .iat is nearly identical to .iloc but it only selects a single scalar value. You must pass it an integer for both the row and column locations

df.iat[2, 5]
'FL'
  • This should be the selected answer. Very informative and lots of use cases. – Gani Simsek Feb 16 at 14:42
  • Agreed with @GaniSimsek This should be the selected answer. Perfect! – fnatic_shank May 25 at 12:06

Let's start with this small df:

import pandas as pd
import time as tm
import numpy as np
n=10
a=np.arange(0,n**2)
df=pd.DataFrame(a.reshape(n,n))

We'll so have

df
Out[25]: 
        0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
    0   0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
    1  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19
    2  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29
    3  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39
    4  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49
    5  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59
    6  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69
    7  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79
    8  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89
    9  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99

With this we have:

df.iloc[3,3]
Out[33]: 33

df.iat[3,3]
Out[34]: 33

df.iloc[:3,:3]
Out[35]: 
    0   1   2   3
0   0   1   2   3
1  10  11  12  13
2  20  21  22  23
3  30  31  32  33



df.iat[:3,:3]
Traceback (most recent call last):
   ... omissis ...
ValueError: At based indexing on an integer index can only have integer indexers

Thus we cannot use .iat for subset, where we must use .iloc only.

But let's try both to select from a larger df and let's check the speed ...

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
"""
Created on Wed Feb  7 09:58:39 2018

@author: Fabio Pomi
"""

import pandas as pd
import time as tm
import numpy as np
n=1000
a=np.arange(0,n**2)
df=pd.DataFrame(a.reshape(n,n))
t1=tm.time()
for j in df.index:
    for i in df.columns:
        a=df.iloc[j,i]
t2=tm.time()
for j in df.index:
    for i in df.columns:
        a=df.iat[j,i]
t3=tm.time()
loc=t2-t1
at=t3-t2
prc = loc/at *100
print('\nloc:%f at:%f prc:%f' %(loc,at,prc))

loc:10.485600 at:7.395423 prc:141.784987

So with .loc we can manage subsets and with .at only a single scalar, but .at is faster than .loc

:-)

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