89

How can I try to read data from socket with timeout? I know, select, pselect, poll, has a timeout field, but using of them disables "tcp fast-path" in tcp reno stack.

The only idea I have is to use recv(fd, ..., MSG_DONTWAIT) in a loop

  • There is also an option of using threads :) but thread signals still needed – osgx Jun 4 '10 at 13:36
168

You can use the setsockopt function to set a timeout on receive operations:

SO_RCVTIMEO

Sets the timeout value that specifies the maximum amount of time an input function waits until it completes. It accepts a timeval structure with the number of seconds and microseconds specifying the limit on how long to wait for an input operation to complete. If a receive operation has blocked for this much time without receiving additional data, it shall return with a partial count or errno set to [EAGAIN] or [EWOULDBLOCK] if no data is received. The default for this option is zero, which indicates that a receive operation shall not time out. This option takes a timeval structure. Note that not all implementations allow this option to be set.

// LINUX
struct timeval tv;
tv.tv_sec = timeout_in_seconds;
tv.tv_usec = 0;
setsockopt(sockfd, SOL_SOCKET, SO_RCVTIMEO, (const char*)&tv, sizeof tv);

// WINDOWS
DWORD timeout = timeout_in_seconds * 1000;
setsockopt(socket, SOL_SOCKET, SO_RCVTIMEO, (const char*)&timeout, sizeof timeout);

// MAC OS X (identical to Linux)
struct timeval tv;
tv.tv_sec = timeout_in_seconds;
tv.tv_usec = 0;
setsockopt(sockfd, SOL_SOCKET, SO_RCVTIMEO, (const char*)&tv, sizeof tv);

Reportedly on Windows this should be done before calling bind. I have verified by experiment that it can be done either before or after bind on Linux and OS X.

  • 2
    Will it work for linux 2.6 tcp? udp? – osgx May 31 '10 at 12:16
  • 5
    Yes it will. Thanks a lot – osgx Jun 4 '10 at 13:33
  • 1
    This answer saved my ass. I was stuck implementing that convoluted "select" crap, with no success. This worked immediately, so much simpler. – MiloDC Nov 16 '17 at 21:06
  • 1
    I set timeout value to 5 secs. Why does it always take 5 seconds for each reading cycle regardless there is incoming data or not? – Han Feb 26 '18 at 12:57
  • 1
    @user463035818 This answer claims it shouldn't. – Tomeamis Apr 14 '18 at 15:08
18

Here's a Simple code to add time out to your recv function using poll in C:

struct pollfd fd;
int ret;

fd.fd = mySocket; // your socket handler 
fd.events = POLLIN;
ret = poll(&fd, 1, 1000); // 1 second for timeout
switch (ret) {
    case -1:
        // Error
        break;
    case 0:
        // Timeout 
        break;
    default:
        recv(mySocket,buf,sizeof(buf), 0); // get your data
        break;
}
0

// works also after bind operation for WINDOWS

DWORD timeout = timeout_in_seconds * 1000;
setsockopt(socket, SOL_SOCKET, SO_RCVTIMEO, (const char*)&timeout, sizeof timeout);
-1

Install a handler for SIGALRM, then use alarm() or ualarm() before a regular blocking recv(). If the alarm goes off, the recv() will return an error with errno set to EINTR.

  • 8
    alarms (and signals) are the wrong way to this task. If I want to use tcp fast path, than I need minimal latency. Signals are slow. – osgx Jun 4 '10 at 13:35
  • 2
    @osgx The signal only occurs if there's a timeout. – David Schwartz Nov 3 '15 at 23:04
-3

LINUX

struct timeval tv;
tv.tv_sec = 30;        // 30 Secs Timeout
tv.tv_usec = 0;        // Not init'ing this can cause strange errors
setsockopt(sockfd, SOL_SOCKET, SO_RCVTIMEO, (const char*)&tv,sizeof(struct timeval));

WINDOWS

DWORD timeout = SOCKET_READ_TIMEOUT_SEC * 1000;
setsockopt(socket, SOL_SOCKET, SO_RCVTIMEO, (const char*)&timeout, sizeof(timeout));

NOTE: You have put this setting before bind() function call for proper run

  • 4
    This question has already been answered years ago. What new value does your solution bring? – Maciej Jureczko Aug 30 '17 at 10:39
  • You have put this setting before bind() function call for proper run this part is not mention in ans – vivek Sep 8 '17 at 10:17

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