I have following code snippets Code illustrates matrix (2D array) with dynamic allocation

C

int** create_matrix(int r, int c)
{
    int i, j, count;

    int **arr = (int **)malloc(r * sizeof(int *));
    for (i=0; i<r; i++)
        arr[i] = (int *)malloc(c * sizeof(int));


    count = 0;
    for (i = 0; i <  r; i++)
       for (j = 0; j < c; j++)
          arr[i][j] = ++count;  

    return arr;
}

Python ( Call C function)

r = 3
c = 3
p_int = POINTER(POINTER(c_int))
testlib.create_matrix.restype = POINTER(POINTER(c_int))
p_int = testlib.create_matrix(r, c) #does p_int and inner array deallocated automatically in python?

My Questions are:

  1. Does python/ctypes handles de-allocation of memory allocated by C?
  2. If we require it to de-allocate manually then how? Calling free or something else?
    • any blog or post which clarifies same would be great
  • Why do you have the line p_int = POINTER(POINTER(c_int))? That's not doing anything useful. – eryksun Feb 27 '15 at 13:05
  • ctypes won't free the array of pointers, nor the rows. First and foremost, it doesn't own the memory, so that would be a terrible idea. Plus it doesn't know p_int points at an array of pointers, nor the length of the array, so how could it know it needs to call free r+1 times? – eryksun Feb 27 '15 at 13:18
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Does python/ctypes handles de-allocation of memory allocated by C?

If your code calls malloc(); it is your responsibility to call the code that calls free().

If we require it to de-allocate manually then how? Calling free or something else? any blog or post which clarifies same would be great

C code should provide the complementary free_matrix() function that should be called by the code that calls create_matrix(). There are plenty of implementations of free_matrix(), example.

You could wrap create_matrix(), free_matrix() into an object and call free_matrix() in its __del__() method. And/or if you want more deterministic approach (the time __del__() is called or whether it is called at all depends on the implementation); you could create a context manager:

from contextlib import contexmanager

@contextmanager
def matrix():
    m = Matrix() # calls create_matrix() internally
    try:
        yield m # Matrix() may protect against out-of-bound error
    finally:
        m.clear() # call free_matrix()

Example:

with matrix() as m:
   print(m[0][1])
  • 1
    +1, but if at all possible, a library should let the client allocate aggregate data. In that case the OP can use a ctypes array such as p_int = (c_int * c * r)() that's reference counted by the interpreter. – eryksun Feb 27 '15 at 16:23
  • @eryksun: yes. Accepting a pre-allocated buffer is a good option. Note: use ((c_int * c) * r) for clarity, to avoid confusion with (c_int * (c * r)). – jfs Feb 27 '15 at 16:39
  • I generally avoid parentheses to clarify order of operations and binary operations unless it's a particularly convoluted expression. I thought the evaluation of c_int * c * r was self-evident. – eryksun Feb 27 '15 at 16:47
  • 1
    @eryksun: given that * is associative operator in most contexts, unlike in this case; the parentheses are warranted even if you yourself always remember what the right interpretation is. – jfs Feb 27 '15 at 16:54

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