10

The problem I face is IE 11 seem to have inconsistent <td> inner height across single <tr> while other browsers keep it the same.

Here's a pen illustrating my problem: http://codepen.io/anon/pen/emKEBZ

In my layout I have an absolutely positioned pseudo-element (green border) which I want to display on a (outside) <td>. I'd like it to be always as high as the whole <tr> it is in. The content of <td>s is dynamic - I have no control over it's size (like I do in the pen).

I gave it height: 100%, assuming that every <td> in a row has the same height.

td {
  position: relative;
}

td:before {
  content: "";
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: -5px;
  width: 3px;
  height: 100%;
  background-color: green;
}

And yeah, that height calculates to the same value across all of the cells in the same row in Firefox and Chrome:

Chrome and Firefox

but to different height for each cell in IE 11:

Ineternet Explorer 1

The problem seems to be that in height: 100% IE refers to the inner height (the one inside the padding) of the containing <td>, while other browsers take total height (height + padding + border). And even then, the inner height of all <td>s along one <tr> is identical in Firefox, while it isn't in IE. Is any of those approaches wrong? Is there a way to force IE to work like other browsers do?

4
  • Have you got a CSS Reset in place? Feb 27 '15 at 11:44
  • @JamesGeorgeDunn Yes, I do. Feb 27 '15 at 11:47
  • This was a bug in IE that has recently been fixed. Future builds of our rendering engine will behave similar to Chrome/Firefox. I recently provided a work-around for a similar question. In the past, 100% was determined by the height of the content within, rather than the offsetHeight of the cell itself.
    – Sampson
    Feb 28 '15 at 18:52
  • A work around I used was to just reference the absolutely positioned cells from the top instead of the bottom. Good use of Illustration @Robert ! May 25 '16 at 22:35
2

I finally managed to do that. Here is the code, hope it helps. Fiddle here.

var spans = document.querySelectorAll( "span.bar" ),
count = spans.length;
while ( count-- ) {
   spans[count].style.height = spans[count].parentElement.offsetHeight + "px";
}
    
body {
    padding:15px;
}
table {
    border: 1px solid black;
    border-spacing: 10px;
    cell-spacing: 0;    
}

tr {
    border: 1px solid red;
}

td {
    vertical-align:center;
    position:relative;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    position: relative;
    border: 1px solid black;
}

td .bar:first-child,
td .bar:last-child {
    display: block;
    background: green;
    width: 3px; 
    left: -5px;
    height: 100%;
    position: absolute; top: 0; 
    z-index: 1;
}

p {
    margin: 0;
    background-color: #dedede;
    padding: 0px;
}

.tall {
    height: 100px;
}

.medium {
    height: 60px;
}

.short {
    height: 30px;
}
<table cellspacing="1" cellpadding "0" border="0">
    <tr>
        <td>
            <span class="bar"></span><p class="tall">Save me!</p><span class="bar"></span>
        </td>
        <td>
            <span class="bar"></span><p class="medium">From problems</p><span class="bar"></span>
        </td>
        <td>
            <span class="bar"></span><p class="short">With IE</p><span class="bar"></span>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

3
  • I confirm it's working. But then not only it uses JavaScript, it also adds quite a lot of markup. I'll be waiting to see if that can't be done using only CSS. If not, I may use JavaScript, but without any extra markup. Still it seems you have put quite a work in writing your solution, so thank you very much for that. Feb 27 '15 at 15:11
  • @Robert I'm also curious if somebody could get it done using only CSS. As I searched and digged the whole internet today after this, it would be a surprise, but would be great to learn from. Feb 27 '15 at 15:15
  • It seems like some IE's oddity, so there's a big chance CSS won't fix that, but who knows... Feb 27 '15 at 15:19
0

I will just add margin to total 100

.tall {
  height: 100px;
}

.medium {
  height: 60px;
  margin: 20px 0;
}

.short {
  height: 30px;
  margin: 35px 0;
}
3
  • In my real problem the content put inside <td> is dynamic - I can't predict it's size. I just made up those .short, .medium and .tall classes to illustrate the problem. Feb 27 '15 at 12:35
  • So as i know IEs doesnt affect height in percentage for table-cell and table-row
    – l2aelba
    Feb 27 '15 at 12:51
  • How can you explain that behavior then? You should run in IE the pen I provided. It'll display the problem in practice, so you can fiddle with it. Feb 27 '15 at 12:53
0

Strange and interesting behavior by IE about table-cell here. If you want an approach, you should put the cell on inline-block and set the height value, then align the content using line-height also reset the line-height for the text container like:

td {
  display: inline-block;
  height: 137px;
  position: relative;
  line-height: 137px;
}

p {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;
  background-color: #dedede;
  line-height: 1;
}

Try on IE, I hope this will help you: http://codepen.io/pik_at/pen/WbyZrG

4
  • It would be good, but what happens, when one of the <p>'s got more than 137 pixel height?:) Feb 27 '15 at 13:51
  • @Pik_at I can't set any fixed height, as the content of the cells will be of variable sizes and the cell should adjust to it. Feb 27 '15 at 14:03
  • 1
    In fact, Using position: relative in a table cell is not defined, look at this post : stackoverflow.com/a/17527089/4583260
    – Pik_at
    Feb 27 '15 at 14:14
  • But you're setting height: 137px on td. I need td to be as high (100%) as the whole tr it's in. And I can't set it to 137px, because I want responsive layout - I don' t know how high the row (or rather content inside it) will be for any of the rows. Feb 27 '15 at 14:26

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