6

Using .Add to add an instance of a class to a generic list is not working.

To illustrate the problem, here are two simple example classes:

public class WorkOrder
{
    private List<Note> _Notes;
    public List<Note> Notes
    {
        get
        {
            return _Notes ?? new List<Note>();
        }
        set
        {
            _Notes = value;
        }
    }
}

public class Note
{
    public string NoteText { get; set; }
    public System.DateTime Time { get; set; }
    public string User { get; set; }
}

You may notice the coding in get on the WorkOrder.Notes property. I put this in so the property wouldn't be initialized with a null value (ref an answer to another question I posted on SO here).

To utilize these classes:

public void Test()
{
    WorkOrder tempWorkOrder = new WorkOrder();
    Note tempNote = new Note()
    {
        User = "Aaron",
        Time = DateTime.Now,
        NoteText = "Work Order pulled from CSV Excel report."
    };
    tempWorkOrder.Notes.Add(tempNote);
}

I would expect the last line in Test() to add tempNote to the list of Note in tempWorkOrder. However, tempWorkOrder.Notes is null after this line completes. No errors or exceptions are thrown.

I'm using VS2013 Express.

What am I doing wrong?

2
  • i wouldn't lazy create the instance of the list - you could cause some unexpected behavior. – Daniel A. White Feb 27 '15 at 14:19
  • 1
    return _Notes ?? new List<Note>(); Does the following, if _Notes is not null, returns it, if it is NULL a new list is created and returned, but never assigned to _Notes. – Stig Feb 27 '15 at 14:21
16
private List<Note> _Notes;
public List<Note> Notes
{
    get
    {
        return _Notes ?? new List<Note>();
    }
    set
    {
        _Notes = value;
    }
}

The get is wrong. It should be:

    get
    {
        if (_Notes == null) {
            _Notes = new List<Note>();
        }
        return _Notes;
    }

because otherwise you don't save the new List<Note>() you created and every time you use the get you recreate it (the get returns a new List<Note>() but doesn't modify _Notes, so every get checks _Notes, see it's null and return a new List<Note>())

Note that if you hate the world (and your fellow programmers) you can compact the get to:

return _Notes ?? (_Notes = new List<Note>());

(see Ternary/null coalescing operator and assignment expression on the right-hand side?) I don't hate enough the world (and my fellow programmers) to do it :-)

6
  • That's it. Looks like all answers so far are correct, but this one answers most completely. Thanks all! – Aaron Thomas Feb 27 '15 at 14:22
  • I don't get the "hate" for return _Notes ?? (_Notes = new List<Note>());. I think it's very clear and in fact i like it more than the single-line if. The linked thread shows some potential for misuse, but you can misuse almost everything. – Corak Feb 27 '15 at 14:56
  • @Corak The single line if was because I was writing directly in the editor of SO that doesn't auto-indent :-) I always use if {}. The "hate" of = inside another expression is probably connected to the "one line, one effect" way of writing code and/or to the tons of bugs caused by the = assignment vs == equality operator in C/C++ – xanatos Feb 27 '15 at 15:00
  • @xanatos - thanks, I see. Well, with "one line, one effect", one won't get far with Linq method chaining. ^_^; – Corak Feb 27 '15 at 15:37
  • @Corak No, because Linq methods are side-effect free (each member of the chain produces something new), so they are ok. – xanatos Feb 27 '15 at 15:39
2

You have not created the list yet there. You need to add a constructor to the WorkOrder as you cannot add to a collection that does not exist. This way, whenever you create a Work Order, you will have an empty list in the `_Notes' field.

It would look something like this:

WorkOrder(){
    _Notes = new List<Note>();
}
2
  • In EF (Which is what the OP is doing in the other question) this is the normal way to initialize the ICollections. – Scott Chamberlain Feb 27 '15 at 14:17
  • Just wanted to point out: this question is for a class that is not tied in with EF - although yes it could easily be made to apply in a Code First situation. – Aaron Thomas Feb 27 '15 at 14:19
1

You never assign _Notes

Do this instead

    private List<Note> _Notes;
    public List<Note> Notes
    {
        get
        {
            if(_Notes == null)
                 _Notes = new List<Note>();
            return _Notes;
        }
        set
        {
            _Notes = value;
        }
    }
1

You're not initializing _Notes.

So while you get a List<Note> back when _Notes is null, it is not assigning the object to _Notes. Each time you access the public property, it is returning a different List<Note> which is why the Add() call appears to not work.

You should rather use:

get 
{ 
  if (_Notes == null) 
     _Notes = new List<Note>(); 
  return _Notes; 
}
1

It should be possible to use the null-coalescing assignment if you are using C# 8, like so:

get => _Notes ??= new List<Note>();

With brackets:

get { return _Notes ??= new List<Note>(); }

0

In the getter for Notes, you're doing nothing to save a reference to the newly-created list. Therefore, every time you access that getter, you'll get a fresh, empty list. So this:

tempWorkOrder.Notes.Add(tempNote);

...is adding tempNote to a List<Note> that is immediately thrown away.

0

The problem is your get method:

    get
    {
        return _Notes ?? new List<Note>();
    }

Since you don't assign the reference of the object you're creating to _Notes, it keeps being null, and you assigned to a list that isn't referenced anywhere else.

This is what you can do instead:

    get
    {
        if (_Notes == null)
            _Notes = new List<Note>();
        return _Notes;
    }
0
public class WorkOrder
{
    public List<Note> Notes {get;set;}

    public WorkOrder()
    {
        Notes = new List<Note>();
    }
}

But in C# 6.0 you should be able to do the following:

public class WorkOrder
{
    public List<Note> Notes {get;set;} = new List<Note>();                
}
0

Late to the party, you can create a small extension method which can guard against null or empty list:

public static bool NotNullAndEmpty<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
  if (source != null && source.Any())
    return true;
  else
    return false;
}

Also, if you are using database, then its advisable to use IEnumerable and do all modifications with IEnumerable. Once done, call .ToList() which will result in a single call to the database.

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