40

I have a pandas.DataFrame called df which has an automatically generated index, with a column dt:

df['dt'].dtype, df['dt'][0]
# (dtype('<M8[ns]'), Timestamp('2014-10-01 10:02:45'))

What I'd like to do is create a new column truncated to hour precision. I'm currently using:

df['dt2'] = df['dt'].apply(lambda L: datetime(L.year, L.month, L.day, L.hour))

This works, so that's fine. However, I've an inkling there's some nice way using pandas.tseries.offsets or creating a DatetimeIndex or similar.

So if possible, is there some pandas wizardry to do this?

  • So you want the same values but without seconds correct – EdChum Feb 27 '15 at 20:15
  • @EdChum Without minutes or seconds... I'm only interested to hour precision – Jon Clements Feb 27 '15 at 20:18
81

In pandas 0.18.0 and later, there are datetime floor, ceil and round methods to round timestamps to a given fixed precision/frequency. To round down to hour precision, you can use:

>>> df['dt2'] = df['dt'].dt.floor('h')
>>> df
                      dt                     dt2
0    2014-10-01 10:02:45     2014-10-01 10:00:00
1    2014-10-01 13:08:17     2014-10-01 13:00:00
2    2014-10-01 17:39:24     2014-10-01 17:00:00

Here's another alternative to truncate the timestamps. Unlike floor, it supports truncating to a precision such as year or month.

You can temporarily adjust the precision unit of the underlying NumPy datetime64 datatype, changing it from [ns] to [h]:

df['dt'].values.astype('<M8[h]')

This truncates everything to hour precision. For example:

>>> df
                       dt
0     2014-10-01 10:02:45
1     2014-10-01 13:08:17
2     2014-10-01 17:39:24

>>> df['dt2'] = df['dt'].values.astype('<M8[h]')
>>> df
                      dt                     dt2
0    2014-10-01 10:02:45     2014-10-01 10:00:00
1    2014-10-01 13:08:17     2014-10-01 13:00:00
2    2014-10-01 17:39:24     2014-10-01 17:00:00

>>> df.dtypes
dt     datetime64[ns]
dt2    datetime64[ns]

The same method should work for any other unit: months 'M', minutes 'm', and so on:

  • Keep up to year: '<M8[Y]'
  • Keep up to month: '<M8[M]'
  • Keep up to day: '<M8[D]'
  • Keep up to minute: '<M8[m]'
  • Keep up to second: '<M8[s]'
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  • 4
    Great answer. Waaay faster than datetime.replace, which is the most common solution mentioned on SO. – Def_Os Apr 14 '16 at 21:44
  • My dt series had a millisecond term (+00:00) that I wanted to get rid of. First part of your answer seems to round (take terms to zero) but not truncate. Second part of your answer with astype did the trick. Thanks! – Ben Holmquist Nov 1 '19 at 20:02
  • for minute frequency all the three: 'm', 'M' and '<M8[m]' throw error. Instead 'min' seems to work. – caped114 Jun 2 at 11:55
2

A method I've used in the past to accomplish this goal was the following (quite similar to what you're already doing, but thought I'd throw it out there anyway):

df['dt2'] = df['dt'].apply(lambda x: x.replace(minute=0, second=0))
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