60

I'd like to allow anyone to list and read all files in my directory tree, but I don't want to make the files executable :

dir
  \subdir1
      file1
  \subdir2
      file2
  ...
  \subdirX
      fileX

The following task makes my directories and files readable, but it makes all the files executable as well:

- name: Make my directory tree readable
  file:
    path: dir
    mode: 0755
    recurse: yes

On the other hand, if I choose mode 0644, then all my files are not executable, but I'm not able to list my directories.

Is it possible to set mode 755 for all directories and 644 for all files in a directory tree?

Thank you.

91

Since version 1.8, Ansible support symbolic modes. Thus, the following would perform the task you want:

- name: Make my directory tree readable
  file:
    path: dir
    mode: u=rwX,g=rX,o=rX
    recurse: yes

Because X (instead of x) only applies to directories or files with at least one x bit set.

  • 1
    This is the best and shortest solution – Quanlong Dec 2 '15 at 7:42
  • 1
    This is awesome! – aaa90210 Feb 10 '16 at 22:29
  • 2
    IIRC, while this works, it will execute quite slowly because it's using stat to individually check every file/folder. Calling chmod on the box is much faster – Jeff Widman May 9 '16 at 20:42
  • 2
    Getting FAILED! => {"changed": false, "failed": true, "msg": "recurse option requires state to be 'directory'", "path": "dir", "state": "absent"} – borisdiakur Jul 2 '16 at 22:19
  • 8
    I wouldn't say this is a full solution. If you unarchive something with various permissions (e.g. all files and directories are set to 755), this won't do anything. Let's say you wanted to then change only the files to be 644, you can't since all of them have at least one x bit set. What is required in ansible is a way to recurse through directories, targeting only files and updating them accordingly, which doesn't seem possible without some workaround. – seeafish Nov 2 '16 at 14:33
24

The Ansible file/copy modules don't give you the granularity of specifying permissions based on file type so you'd most likely need to do this manually by doing something along these lines:

- name: Ensure directories are 0755
  command: find {{ path }} -type d -exec chmod -c 0755 {} \;
  register: chmod_result
  changed_when: "chmod_result.stdout != \"\""

- name: Ensure files are 0644
  command: find {{ path }} -type f -exec chmod -c 0644 {} \;
  register: chmod_result
  changed_when: "chmod_result.stdout != \"\""

These would have the effect of recursing through {{ path }} and changing the permissions of every file or directory to the specified permissions.

  • 4
    Actually, this is a workaround, not a solution. The state of this task is always "changed", so it's not useful for running constantly to ensure that the configuration is consistent. – mykola Mar 5 '15 at 4:24
  • 4
    Semantics. Unless somebody is willing to write a module, shell script, etc. to do this and report back to Ansible whether anything has changed then this is about the only solution there is. The original question didn't specify a need for that, just the desire to recursively change permissions based on files vs. directories. – Bruce P Mar 5 '15 at 14:31
  • 3
    Would make a good feature request: github.com/ansible/ansible/issues – David Mar 11 '15 at 20:52
  • 1
    If the permissions are ok for the owner, you could also mode: go=u-w – Penz Nov 8 '15 at 17:22
  • 3
    @mykola You could try chmod -c and use a changed_when condition. – augurar Dec 15 '15 at 22:49

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