93

It seems possible to nest a class in a constructor which can then be instantiated from anywhere within the class, is this official?

[EDIT] E.g.,

class C {

    constructor() {
        class D {
            constructor() { }
        }
    }

    method() {
        var a = new D();  // works fine
    }

}

//var a = new D();  // fails in outer scope

The traceur generated JS https://google.github.io/traceur-compiler/demo/repl.html

$traceurRuntime.ModuleStore.getAnonymousModule(function() {
  "use strict";
  var C = function C() {
    var D = function D() {};
    ($traceurRuntime.createClass)(D, {}, {});
  };
  ($traceurRuntime.createClass)(C, {method: function() {
      var a = new D();
    }}, {});
  return {};
});
//# sourceURL=traceured.js
6
  • Can you provide a concrete example? Feb 28, 2015 at 17:01
  • Or how did you find this out? No browser implements classes yet. Feb 28, 2015 at 17:12
  • I'm sure I read this somewhere and it duly stayed in mind - hacked with traceur (ref. link above). Feb 28, 2015 at 17:18
  • 1
    That is most likely a bug in traceur. Feb 28, 2015 at 17:19

5 Answers 5

113

No, there are no nested class scopes in ES6, and there is no such thing as private members in the class syntax anyway if you mean that.

Of course you can put a second class as a static property on another class, like this:

class A {
    …
}
A.B = class {
    …
};

or you use an extra scope:

var C;
{
    class D {
        constructor() { }
    }
    C = class C {
        constructor() { }
        method() {
            var a = new D();  // works fine
        }
    }
}

(There seems to be a bug with traceur as it uses a hoisted var for the class declaration instead of block scope)


With the class field syntax, it will also be possible to write a single expression or declaration:

class A {
    …
    static B = class {
         …
    }
};
16
  • 6
    should be A.B = class B { ... Otherwise the class will be anonymous.
    – levi
    Jul 24, 2015 at 15:41
  • 1
    @levi: There's nothing wrong with anonymous classes :-) Of course you can add it if you want.
    – Bergi
    Jul 25, 2015 at 13:34
  • 1
    @Dakusan No, that is not a flavour of JS. That's TypeScript (which you maybe have set to compile to ES6).
    – Bergi
    Apr 8, 2017 at 22:43
  • 1
    Should include the ; after the } for the B class Apr 17, 2018 at 15:29
  • 2
    @JonTrent You need to refer to A itself, not to an instance of it. You can use either A.B or this.constructor.B. I would recommend to avoid putting the class on the prototype.
    – Bergi
    Sep 1, 2019 at 14:19
10

something like that?

class A {
    constructor () {
        this.B = class {
            echo () {
                console.log('I am B class');
            }
        }
    }
    echo () {
        this.b = new this.B;
        this.b.echo();
    }
}

var a = new A;

a.echo();

4
  • Add more informations to your answer, not only a code block
    – live2
    Apr 4, 2018 at 20:31
  • The drawback to this option (relative to Bergi's answer) is that for every instance of class A, there will be a property containing the definition of class B.
    – Trentium
    Sep 1, 2019 at 14:02
  • This is the only right answer here. The this.b = new this.B; part is important.
    – Redu
    Mar 15, 2021 at 19:15
  • @Ammatwain Do you know any memory implecations that we need to be aware of for using this?
    – It's K
    Dec 30, 2021 at 7:59
8

You could use a getter:

class Huffman {
  constructor() { /* ... */ }
  static get Node() {
    return class Node {
      constructor() {  
        var API = this;
        API.symbol = 0; API.weight = 0;
        return API;    
      }
    };
  }
  get Node() {
    return Huffman.Node;
  }
  encode() { /* ... */ }
  decode() { /* ... */ }
  /* ... */
}

// usage
huffman = new Huffman;
new huffman.Node;
new Huffman.Node;

Which in latest Chrome Dev 44.0.2376.0 on Apple 10.10.2 gives in console

  • new huffman.Node
  • Node {symbol: 0, weight: 0}
  • new Huffman.Node
  • Node {symbol: 0, weight: 0}

In other news, getters are the secret sauce that let's you do a whole bunch of cool things in ES6.

Please Note The above construction breaks instanceof for Node (why? because a whole new class is defined with every get call). To not break instanceof define Node outside of the scope of a single getter, either in the constructor (disabling the Huffman.Node class property and causing instanceof to work within the namespace of a single Huffman instance, and break outside that), or define Node in a sibling or ancestor scope to Huffman (allowing instanceof to work in all scopes below that the one where Node is defined).

4
  • 1
    …and with breaking instanceof/the prototype chain, you also break performance. You really should just use huffman.Node = class { constructor(){ this.symbol=0; this.weight=0; } };
    – Bergi
    Apr 28, 2015 at 8:20
  • I tend to code one class per module/file nowadays, though have thought that if a class was there to populate an attribute of another class (i.e., being deleted when the instance of the class it is an attribute of is deleted) and was used by no other classes, then I would put the class in the same module - which effectively is the same as nested classes (but not quite, it would not be possible to nest a class in a nested class in this way, a nested scope perhaps at this point). Apr 28, 2015 at 13:49
  • Wait, those classes in your code (and the one the OP wants) are not on properties of the instances, but they are tied to the whole class itself.
    – Bergi
    Apr 28, 2015 at 14:21
  • The non-static get is a property of the instance and the static get is a property of the class. Another nice solution is to put related classes into a module, so we could have a Huffman module with Encoder, Node and Decoder classes. They're all module properties and all in the same scope. Apr 28, 2015 at 15:32
4

When you create a nested child class in a constructor of a parent class, this means every instance of the parent class has its own child class. Typically this is not what you want. Instead you want a child class, which is shared among all instances of the parent class. This means the nested class must be static. This is an example:

class Parent
{
  static Child = class Child {
    constructor (name) { console.log (`Child: ${name}`); }
  }
  
  constructor (...names) {
    console.log ('Parent');
    this.children = names.map (name => new Parent.Child (name));
  }
}

var p = new Parent ('Alice', 'Bob');

console.log (`same type? ${p.children[0].constructor === p.children[1].constructor}`);

-1

Simpler:

class A {

    B = new (class {

        myMethod(){
            console.log('B method');
        }

    })();

}

However, seems that is not considered as a good pattern.

3
  • This does not actually create a nested class, and it does employ the anonymous class instance antipattern
    – Bergi
    Dec 9, 2023 at 14:35
  • This is essentially equivalent to class a { constructor() { console.log('hello world'); this.b = {}; } }
    – Bergi
    Dec 9, 2023 at 14:36
  • After your edit, this is essentially equivalent to class A { B = { myMethod() { … } }; }
    – Bergi
    Jan 19 at 19:17

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