5

Twitter API allows to update "the authenticating user’s current status", as explained in the documentation page.

What I'd like to achieve instead is to update another user's current status. Consider a magazine's twitter account. I'd like different people to be able to update the magazine's status. Tweetdeck allows this, but it also allows a whole lot of other things like access to Direct Messages. I only want to provide certain authenticated users an interface (similar to Twitter's post-a-tweet interface) to post status and images to the shared account.

I could not find a simple explanation of how to use Twitter API to achieve the above functionality. Could someone please help?

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If you have an app that implements the status update API and it is delivered to different people and they authorize the app with the magazine's twitter account, then the app will update that status. I can show an example also with code if this is what you're asking. However the main point is that, once a user has authorized the app, she/he doesn't need to be connected with the shared login any longer because the app will do that on the magazine's behalf. BTW, similar question here: Twitter API: post on behalf of whom?

Edit

Just to summarize the comments:

The standard OAuth authentication requires the following main steps 1) to develop an app (registered with OAuth consumer key and secret) that implements the API update status 2) to install and authorize the app: during this step the onwer will be requested to enter the credentials of the passive account in a Twitter link opened with the browser, 3) then - after a fallback - the app will store the access token and any user of the app will be able to update the status without login

Once you have developed an app that can post tweets on behalf of a passive twitter account using the standard OAuth, you could make that functionality available to the authenticated users of a website.

  • I had found that question before posting this one. If I'm not wrong, the answer on that comment describes how you can update the status of the authenticating user- which is the normal thing you do. What I'm interested in is to update the status of someone else. Let's take two twitter accounts, A and B. A creates an app, and using that app, B update's A's status. Are we talking about the same thing? – vpk Mar 10 '15 at 8:04
  • Yes, what I'm saying is that A (or a developer, it is not important to be A here) creates an app => the app is delivered to B => the first time after installation the app needs to be authorized with A's credential => then B can update A's status using that app. To implement a different authentication method "you need to get permission from Twitter". – user4569980 Mar 10 '15 at 9:06
  • A could deliver a pre-authorized app to B if the app has already stored A's userKey and userSecret – user4569980 Mar 10 '15 at 9:22
  • But it is obviously recommended (dev.twitter.com/oauth/overview/single-user) that "You shouldn’t ever share the combination of your OAuth consumer key, secret, access token, and access token secret." – user4569980 Mar 10 '15 at 9:39
  • sorry, sounds confusing again. not sure i understand how does B update A's status. If A can "compose a tweet"- she'll update the status herself. I want A to be a passive user, whose statuses are updated by others acting on her behalf. I do not want A to auto-generate tweets or login. B will "think" and "compose a tweet" and then use the app to post it to A's timeline (as A's tweet). Are we still talking the same thing? – vpk Mar 10 '15 at 9:46

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