5

What is the difference between using or not using the CONSTRAINT keyword when working with Foreign Keys on SQL Server?

I noticed that apparently both worked the same in this specific case, without CONSTRAINT:

CREATE TABLE ClientsPhones
(
     ClientPhone varchar(10) NOT NULL,
     ClientID smallint NOT NULL,

     PRIMARY KEY (ClientPhone),
     FOREIGN KEY (ClientID) REFERENCES Clients(ClientID)
);

And with CONSTRAINT:

CREATE TABLE ClientsPhones
(
    ClientPhone varchar(10) NOT NULL,
    ClientID smallint NOT NULL,

    PRIMARY KEY (ClientPhone),
    CONSTRAINT fk_ClientID 
      FOREIGN KEY (ClientID) REFERENCES Clients(ClientID)
);

Both didn't let me add records to the table unless the ClientID already existed on the Clients table, and the same ClientID and ClientPhone weren't already on the ClientsPhones table.

Is there any real difference between the two besides the fact that I'm able to name the constraint?

2
  • 9
    If you use CONSTRAINT fk_ClientID, then you give your constraint a name - which you can pick, to suit your naming rules. Otherwise, if you omit that clause, SQL Server will pick a name for the constraint for you - and it won't be easy to figure it out, nor will it be intuitive and obvious. Always name your constraints yourself! PS: also name your primary key constraints! – marc_s Feb 28 '15 at 22:06
  • The use of constraint allows you to assign a specific name to the foreign key constraint. If chosen carefully, this can make error messages easier to understand. – Gordon Linoff Feb 28 '15 at 22:06
6

If you don't create constraint.it will automatically create own constraint name

the foreign key index name is generated using the name of the referencing foreign key column Automatically.

So there is no way to see difference of using and not using Constraint keyword. by default constraint name will be defined.

1

I did some research and don't believe Hell Boy's answer was as clear as it could be and had some misinformation.

Every constraint you add to a database has a name set by default. This includes PRIMARY KEY, FOREIGN KEY, DEFAULT, NOT NULL. It isn't necessarily the name of the column(s) used.

You can imagine that when you don't use the CONSTRAINT keyword SQL Server puts it there as well as generates a name for you.

If you want to remove or change a constrain you would either have to delete the entire table and recreate it with the correct constraints or you can reference the constraint by name and then alter it somewhat like a column using the ALTER keyword. This can be useful for when you need to delete a table with a foreign key. If you name the foreign key constraint you can delete it and then the table instead of having to delete the table the foreign key points to.

1
  • So basically you're saying that you can't alter a CONSTRAINT that was created by default by SQL Server but you can alter a CONSTRAINT that you directly created and applied a name to? – spencer741 Feb 4 at 8:36

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