108

I face the same problem often. I need to count the runs of a lambda for use outside the lambda.

E.g.:

myStream.stream().filter(...).forEach(item -> { ... ; runCount++});
System.out.println("The lambda ran " + runCount + "times");

The issue is that runCount needs to be final, so it cannot be an int. It cannot be an Integer because that's immutable. I could make it class level variable (i.e. a field) but I'll only need it in this block of code.

I know there are various ways, I'm just curious what is your preferred solution for this?
Do you use an AtomicInteger or an array reference or some other way?

2
  • 7
    @Sliver2009 No it's not.
    – Rohit Jain
    Mar 1, 2015 at 6:37
  • 4
    @Florian You've to use AtomicInteger here.
    – Rohit Jain
    Mar 1, 2015 at 6:38

12 Answers 12

80

Let me reformat your example a bit for the sake of discussion:

long runCount = 0L;
myStream.stream()
    .filter(...)
    .forEach(item -> { 
        foo();
        bar();
        runCount++; // doesn't work
    });
System.out.println("The lambda ran " + runCount + " times");

If you really need to increment a counter from within a lambda, the typical way to do so is to make the counter an AtomicInteger or AtomicLong and then call one of the increment methods on it.

You could use a single-element int or long array, but that would have race conditions if the stream is run in parallel.

But notice that the stream ends in forEach, which means that there is no return value. You could change the forEach to a peek, which passes the items through, and then count them:

long runCount = myStream.stream()
    .filter(...)
    .peek(item -> { 
        foo();
        bar();
    })
    .count();
System.out.println("The lambda ran " + runCount + " times");

This is somewhat better, but still a bit odd. The reason is that forEach and peek can only do their work via side effects. The emerging functional style of Java 8 is to avoid side effects. We did a little of that by extracting the increment of the counter into a count operation on the stream. Other typical side effects are adding items to collections. Usually these can be replaced via use of collectors. But without knowing what actual work you're trying to do, I can't suggest anything more specific.

3
  • 9
    It should be noted that peek stops working, once count implementations start using shortcuts for SIZED streams. That may never be an issue with filtered stream but can create great surprises if someone changes the code at a later time…
    – Holger
    Mar 2, 2015 at 9:08
  • 24
    Declare final AtomicInteger i = new AtomicInteger(1); and somewhere in your lambda use i.getAndAdd(1). Stop and remember how nice int i=1; ... i++ used to be.
    – aliopi
    Oct 8, 2015 at 13:49
  • 3
    If Java would implement interfaces such as Incrementable on numeric classes, including AtomicInteger, and declare operators such as ++ to be fancy-looking functions, we wouldn't need operator overloading and still have very readable code. Apr 23, 2018 at 12:02
47

As an alternative to sync hassling AtomicInteger one could use an integer array instead. As long as the reference to the array does not get another array assigned (and that's the point) it can be used as a final variable while the values of the fields can change arbitrarily.

    int[] iarr = {0}; // final not neccessary here if no other array is assigned
    stringList.forEach(item -> {
            iarr[0]++;
            // iarr = {1}; Error if iarr gets other array assigned
    });
3
  • If you want to make sure that the reference does not get another array assigned, you can declare iarr as a final variable. But as @pisaruk points out, this won't work in parallel. Aug 24, 2017 at 17:35
  • 3
    I think, for simple foreach directly on collection ( without streams ) , this is a good enough approach. thanks !!
    – Sabir Khan
    Feb 14, 2018 at 11:43
  • This is the simplest solution, as long as you're not running things in parallel. Apr 30, 2018 at 14:46
15
AtomicInteger runCount = 0L;
long runCount = myStream.stream()
    .filter(...)
    .peek(item -> { 
        foo();
        bar();
        runCount.incrementAndGet();
    });
System.out.println("The lambda ran " + runCount.incrementAndGet() + "times");
5
  • 19
    Please edit with more information. Code-only and "try this" answers are discouraged, because they contain no searchable content, and don't explain why someone should "try this". We make an effort here to be a resource for knowledge.
    – Mogsdad
    Mar 21, 2016 at 16:50
  • 7
    Your answer confuses me. You got two variables both named runCount. I suspect you intended to have only one of them, but which one?
    – Ole V.V.
    Jan 20, 2017 at 12:23
  • 1
    I found the runCount.getAndIncrement() to be more suitable. Great answer!
    – kospol
    May 15, 2017 at 20:24
  • 5
    The AtomicIntegerhelped me out but i would init it with new AtomicInteger(0) May 22, 2019 at 7:49
  • 3
    1) This code won't compile : the stream has no terminal operation that returns a long 2) Even if it would, 'runCount' value would always be '1' : - the stream has no terminal operation so peek() lambda argument will never be called - System.out line increments the run count before displaying it
    – Cédric
    Oct 16, 2020 at 9:30
13

You shouldn't use AtomicInteger, you shouldn't use things unless you have a really good reason to use. And the reason for using AtomicInteger might be only allowing concurrent accesses or such as.

When it comes to your problem;

Holder can be use for holding and incrementing it inside a lambda. And after you can get it by calling runCount.value

Holder<Integer> runCount = new Holder<>(0);

myStream.stream()
    .filter(...)
    .forEach(item -> { 
        foo();
        bar();
        runCount.value++; // now it's work fine!
    });
System.out.println("The lambda ran " + runCount + " times");
9
  • 1
    There's a few Holder classes in the JDK. This one seems to be javax.xml.ws.Holder.
    – Brad Cupit
    Feb 6, 2020 at 17:02
  • 3
    Really? And why?
    – lkahtz
    Jul 22, 2020 at 7:02
  • 2
    I agree - if I know I'm not doing any concurrent operations in the lamda/stream why would I want to use AtomicInteger that is designed to cater for concurrency - that might introduce locking etc., i.e. the reason why, many years ago, the JDK introduced the new set of collections and their iterators that did not perform any locking - why burden something with a performance reducing capability e.g. locking when locking is not required for many scenarios.
    – Volksman
    Oct 18, 2020 at 0:06
  • 1
    Stream.forEach is explicitly nondeterministic so using Holder might or might not work depending on the underlying stream.
    – michid
    Jan 20, 2021 at 10:21
  • 1
    @GeroldBroser it is also non deterministic regarding the calling thread: "For any given element, the action may be performed at whatever time and in whatever thread the library chooses". This can result in race conditions rendering the result invalid.
    – michid
    Jan 20, 2021 at 13:21
12

For me, this did the trick, hopefully someone finds it useful:

AtomicInteger runCount = new AtomicInteger(0);
myStream.stream().filter(...).forEach(item -> runCount.getAndIncrement());
System.out.println("The lambda ran " + runCount.get() + "times");

getAndIncrement() Java documentation states :

Atomically increments the current value, with memory effects as specified by VarHandle.getAndAdd. Equivalent to getAndAdd(1).

1
  • i have ``` AtomicInteger rowCount = new AtomicInteger(0); items.stream() .map(x -> (String.format("%3s. %-45s - count: %s", rowCount.getAndIncrement(), x.getName(), x.getSize()))) .forEach(System.out::println); ```
    – Sasha Bond
    Mar 2 at 18:41
5

Another alternative is to use apache commons MutableInt.

MutableInt cnt = new MutableInt(0);
myStream.stream()
    .filter(...)
    .forEach(item -> { 
        foo();
        bar();
        cnt.increment();
    });
System.out.println("The lambda ran " + cnt.getValue() + " times");
1
4

If you don't want to create a field because you only need it locally, you can store it in an anonymous class:

int runCount = new Object() {
    int runCount = 0;
    {
        myStream.stream()
                .filter(...)
                .peek(x -> runCount++)
                .forEach(...);
    }
}.runCount;

Weird, I know. But it does keep the temporary variable out of even local scope.

12
  • 2
    what on earth is going on here, in need of a little more explanation thx Jan 28, 2019 at 8:54
  • 2
    @MrCholo It's an initializer block. It runs before the constructor.
    – shmosel
    Aug 5, 2019 at 22:10
  • 2
    @MrCholo No, it's an instance initializer.
    – shmosel
    Aug 6, 2019 at 0:07
  • 2
    @MrCholo An anonymous class cannot have an explicitly declared constructor.
    – shmosel
    Aug 6, 2019 at 0:17
  • 2
    @OlivierGrégoire I'll grant that it's confusing at first glance, but I'm not sure why you think there's a performance concern. Most of the solutions here involve object creation.
    – shmosel
    Jan 20, 2021 at 15:39
3

Another way of doing this (useful if you'd like your count to only be incremented in some cases, like if an operation was successful) is something like this, using mapToInt() and sum():

int count = myStream.stream()
    .filter(...)
    .mapToInt(item -> { 
        foo();
        if (bar()){
           return 1;
        } else {
           return 0;
    })
    .sum();
System.out.println("The lambda ran " + count + "times");

As Stuart Marks noted, this is still somewhat odd, because it's not completely avoiding side effects (depending on what foo() and bar() are doing).

And another way of incrementing a variable in a lambda that's accessible outside of it is to use a class variable:

public class MyClass {
    private int myCount;

    // Constructor, other methods here

    void myMethod(){
        // does something to get myStream
        myCount = 0;
        myStream.stream()
            .filter(...)
            .forEach(item->{
               foo(); 
               myCount++;
        });
    }
}

In this example, using a class variable for a counter in one method probably doesn't make sense, so I'd caution against it unless there's a good reason to. Keeping class variables final if possible can be helpful in terms of thread safety, etc (see http://www.javapractices.com/topic/TopicAction.do?Id=23 for a discussion on using final).

To get a better idea of why lambdas work the way they do, https://www.infoq.com/articles/Java-8-Lambdas-A-Peek-Under-the-Hood has a detailed look.

1
  • There's a '}' missing for the else and the if...else can be shortened to return bar() ? 1 : 0; Jan 18, 2021 at 19:52
1

reduce also works,you can use it like this

myStream.stream().filter(...).reduce((item, sum) -> sum += item);
0
1

For me, this is the most elegant way.

long count = list.stream()
  .peek(/* do your stuff here */)
  .long();

There is a bug in JDK 9,10 that prevents the above solution from working, but you can work around it as follows. https://bugs.openjdk.java.net/browse/JDK-8198356

long count = list.stream()
  .peek(/* do your stuff here */)
  .collect(Collectors.counting());
0
AtomicInteger runCount = new AtomicInteger(0);

elements.stream()
  //...
  .peek(runCount.incrementAndGet())
  .collect(Collectors.toList());

// runCount.get() should have the num of times lambda code was executed
0

An enum can be used, too. Especially if you have more than one counter in an iteration:

import java.util.Arrays;

class LambdaCounter {

    enum CountOf {

        NO,
        OK,
        ERROR;

        private int count;

        // can be named inc(), instead of the Greek capital Delta,
        // which stands for the math increment operator '∆' <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E2%88%86>
        synchronized int Δ( final int... times ) {

            if ( times.length <= 0 )
                return ++count; // increase by 1

            return count += Arrays.stream( times ).sum(); // increase by arguments
        }

        // can be named val[ue](), instead of the Greek capital Xi,
        // which stands for the math identity operator '≡' <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triple_bar>
        int Ξ() {
            return count;
        }
    }

    public static void main( final String[] args ) {

        Arrays.stream( new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 } )
            .forEach( i -> {
                CountOf.NO.Δ();
                @SuppressWarnings( "unused" )
                final int LHS_DUMMY =
                    i % 2 == 0
                        ? CountOf.OK.Δ()
                        : CountOf.ERROR.Δ();
            } );
        System.out.printf( "No: %d, OK: %d, Error: %d, Error.inc(38): %d, Error.inc(4, 4): %d%n",
            CountOf.NO.Ξ(), CountOf.OK.Ξ(), CountOf.ERROR.Ξ(), CountOf.ERROR.Δ( 38 ), CountOf.ERROR.Δ( 4, 4 ) );

        // Output:
        // No: 7, OK: 3, Error: 4, Error.inc(38): 42, Error.inc(4, 4): 50
    }
}

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