30

I'm trying to convert an existing node.js project from javascript to typescript. I've been using the default 404 error catcher from the Visual Studio Express 4 template:

// catch 404 and forward to error handler
app.use(function (req, res, next) {
    var err = new Error('Not Found');
    err.status = 404;
    next(err);
});

However, I'm getting the following error message: Property 'status' does not exist on type 'Error'.

I get a similar message if I try and invoke the Error's .stack property: Property 'stack' does not exist on type 'Error'.

Does anyone know what's going on here?

Edit: Steve Fenton points out that I could just put the error status on the response object. However, my error handling mechanism uses a two-step process:

  1. Create the 404 error and set its status
  2. Hand it on to the following generic handler:

    app.use(function (err, req, res, next) {
        res.status(err.status || 500);
        res.render('error', {
            message: err.message,
            error: {}
        });
    });
    

So the error status is first set on the Error object, then read back by the error handler to decide how to handle the error.

18

Extend global Error

You can tell TypeScript that for your use case Error might have a status on it:

interface Error {
    status?: number;
}

So you get:

interface Error {
    status?: number;
}

var err = new Error('Not Found');
err.status = 404;

Alternative

Put the status on the res and send the err. For Example:

// catch 404 and forward to error handler
app.use(function (req, res, next) {
    var err = new Error('Not Found');
    res.status(404); // using response here
    next(err);
});
5
  • Thanks Basarat. I just assumed this was an appropriate way to do things because it's how it's done in the Visual Studio Express 4 template. – Joel Mar 3 '15 at 10:57
  • Ouch. bad visual studio team – basarat Mar 3 '15 at 23:55
  • This template, was it js template or typescript template? – Andrew Savinykh Aug 16 '15 at 7:30
  • The OP's code looks idiomatic with regard to Express (per [expressjs.com/en/guide/error-handling.html], i.e. res.statusCode is set from err.status (or err.statusCode). (Also headers) - but shouldn't the Express types then contain something like: declare global { // Shouldn't Express do this? interface Error { status?: number; statusCode?: number; headers: [string] } } ? (Sorry for the poor formatting) - is there discussion on this somewhere already? – Timothy Johns Sep 29 '20 at 19:05
  • And how do you tell typescript that Error has status on it? – Haseeb Anwar May 22 at 8:03
15

The best way in my opinion, is not to disable type checks by setting the error to any, or creating a new Error type, since one already exists in @types/node.

Instead, you should extend that error type:

interface ResponseError extends Error {
  status?: number;
}
1
  • I'll recommend the above approach, which looks more sophisticated to me – MeVimalkumar Oct 19 '19 at 7:23
8

You put the error code on the response...

app.use(function (req, res, next) {
    var err = new Error('Not Found');
    res.status(404)
    next(err);
});
8
import * as express from 'express';
interface Error {
  status?: number;
  message?: string;
}

app.use((err: Error, req: express.Request, res: express.Response, next: express.NextFunction) => {
  res.status(err.status || 500);
  res.render('error', {
    message: err.message,
    error: err
  });
});
1
  • 2
    It makes a nicer answer if you use some words to help the OP understand what part of your code resolves their question. – miltonb Oct 18 '16 at 2:43
7

This is generally a question of how to lazily initialize objects in Typescript.

The ideal way to do this is:

interface ErrorWithStatus extends Error {
    status: string
}

let foo = new Error() as ErrorWithStatus;
foo.status = '404';

Using any, or interfaces with nullable fields, leave you with subpar and weak contracts.

1
  • 1
    It should be as ErrorWithStatus. But you get my upvote :-) – Dac0d3r Aug 13 '19 at 22:34
4

Another option in TypeScript:

let err: any;
err = new Error();
err.status = 404;
1
  • 1
    Making the type any completely gives up one of the greatest advantages of Typescript - type-checking and enforcement. This solution probably goes against the OP's objective for switching from JavaScript to Typescript in the first place. Some of the others are better in my opinion – BeetleJuice May 17 '19 at 10:32
3

Another option in TypeScript:

const err: { status?: number, message:string } = new Error('Not Found');
err.status = 404;
1
  • 1
    I think extending Error is a better solution because it allows the TypeScript compiler to understand the full shape of the object instantiated. This solution limits understanding to just the status and message properties. – BeetleJuice May 17 '19 at 10:30
2

If I am not mistaken it is always best to get the type that is actually expected. I couldn't find any hard support that I am right, but I use:

import createError, { HttpError } from 'http-errors';

and to be complete for all types I also import the parameter types of use:

import express, { Request, Response, NextFunction } from 'express';

The actual function I use then looks like this:

app.use((err: HttpError, req: Request, res: Response, next: NextFunction) => { ... }

In your case if you want to create your own error:

app.use((req: Request, res: Response, next: NextFunction) => {
  next(createError(404));
});

or closer to your code:

app.use((req: Request, res: Response, next: NextFunction) => {
  let err = new HttpError('Not found');
  err.status = 404;
  next(err);
});
0

I just went for

var err = new Error('Not Found');
err['status'] = 404;
1
  • OP is using TypeScript. This solution will give up the ability to use intellisense/autocomplete b/c the compiler won't understand the full shape of Error, so some of the others are better in my opinion. – BeetleJuice May 17 '19 at 10:29

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