I have been tasked to research the differences between these two implementations to better understand the differences between the two when it comes to development difficulty and feature set but I have not found any clear and concise comparisons between the two.

  • I'm assuming you mean differences between VoiceXML and TwiML (not just XML). – Tim Lytle Mar 5 '15 at 21:18
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think you're asking for the difference between things like VoiceXML, TwiML, and PlivoXML. Both Tropo and Nexmo support VoiceXML, so this is a comparison of the XML formats (and associated platforms) not the specific vendors. I added PlivoXML as it's similar to TiwML, but unique. Disclaimer: I work for Nexmo.

All three describe what happens during a phone call - how the machine interacts with the caller. Essentially HTML for a phone call, allowing you to present information to the user (play audio, read text), or get information from the user (record audio, recognize speech, press digits).

Portability

VoiceXML is a industry standard, and like HTML it's managed by the W3C. Both TwiML and PlivoXML are proprietary. That means a VoiceXML application isn't tied to a specific vendor.

Input

All three support recording audio or capturing DTMF (keypresses). VoiceXML supports grammar, allowing you to recognize speech, and tune that recognition engine. TwiML and PlivoXML do not have that support.

TwiML example (expecting DTMF):

<Response>
    <Gather action="process.php">
        <Say>Press a few digits.</Say>
    </Gather>
</Response>

VoiceXML example (expecting DTMF or recognition):

<vxml version = "2.1">
    <form>
        <field name="department">
            <prompt>Press 1 or say sales, press 2 or say support.</prompt>
            <grammar xml:lang="en-US" root = "TOPLEVEL" mode="voice" >
                <rule id="TOPLEVEL" scope="public">
                    <one-of>
                        <item> sales </item>
                        <item> support </item>
                    </one-of>
                </rule>
            </grammar>
            <grammar xml:lang="en-US" root = "TOPLEVEL" mode="dtmf" >
                <rule id="TOPLEVEL" scope="public">
                    <one-of>
                        <item> 1 <tag> out.department="sales"; </tag> </item>
                        <item> 2 <tag> out.department="support"; </tag> </item>
                    </one-of>
                </rule>
            </grammar>
        </field>
        <block>
            <submit next="../php/form.php" method="post"/>
        </block>
    </form>
</vxml>

Output

All three support both text to speech and playing audio (referenced by a link). Plivo also allows you to play audio to an ongoing call using the API, but that's outside the context of PlivoXML.

TwiML example:

<Response>
    <Say>Hello From TwiML</Say>
</Response>

VoiceXML example:

<vxml version="2.1">
    <form>
        <block>
            <prompt>Hello from VXML!</prompt>
        </block>
    </form>
</vxml>

Variables & State

TwiML and PlivoXML allow you to track some session just like a browser would; however, VoiceXML has a much more useful concept of state allowing you to share variables across multiple requests.

A TwiML or PlivoXML document can only really collect one thing at a time Getting digits or a recording from a user is really analogous to a form post with a single element.

VoiceXML forms are not limited to a single input, and contain multiple fields of recognized speech, DTMF presses, recordings. VoiceXML also allows that data to be played / read back to the user in the same document, as it's simply a variable. In fact, a single VoiceXML document can have multiple forms, and a user can navigate between those forms.

VoiceXML example:

<form id="welcome">
    <field name="customer_type">
        <prompt>Say 'new' or press 1 if you're a new  customer, press 2 or say 'existing' if you have an account.</prompt>
        <grammar xml:lang="en-US" root = "TOPLEVEL" mode="voice" >
            ...
        </grammar>
        <grammar xml:lang="en-US" root = "TOPLEVEL" mode="dtmf" >
            ...
        </grammar>
    </field>
    <filled>
        <prompt cond="customer_type=='new'">
            Thanks for contacting us.
        </prompt>
        <prompt cond="customer_type=='existing'">
            Thanks for being a loyal customer.
        </prompt>
        <goto expr="'#' + customer_type" />
    </filled>
</form>

Conferencing & Queues

TwiML and PlivoXML support adding a call to a conference in the XML document. TwiML also supports the concept of a queue (and adding a call to it) right from TwiML (PlivoXML does not have that queue support). VoiceXML has no notion of conferencing or queueing in the VXML document (however, an API may provide an external mechanism to conference multiple active calls together).

_TwiML example:

<Response>
    <Dial>
        <Conference>Room 1234</Conference>
    </Dial>
</Response>

Transfers

All three support adding a second leg to an ongoing call. VoiceXML allows you to use the output of the transfer to direct the rest of the document.

TwiML example:

<Response>
    <Dial timeout="10" record="true">415-123-4567</Dial>
</Response>

VoiceXML Example:

<vxml version = "2.1">
    <form>
        <transfer name="result" dest="tel:+14158058810" bridge="true">
            <prompt>Please wait while we transfer you.</prompt>
            <grammar xml:lang="en-US" root = "TOPLEVEL" mode="voice">
                <rule id="TOPLEVEL" scope="public">
                    <one-of>
                        <item> disconnect </item>
                    </one-of>
                </rule>
            </grammar>
        </transfer>
        <filled>
            <if cond="result == 'busy'">
                <prompt>Sorry, they're busy.</prompt>
            <elseif cond="result == 'noanswer'" />
                <prompt>Sorry, they didn't answer.</prompt>
            <else />
                <prompt>You spoke for <value expr="result$.duration" /> seconds.</prompt>
            </if>

            <if cond="result$.inputmode == 'voice'">
                You ended the call by saying, <value expr="result$.utterance" />.
            </if>
        </filled>
        <block>
            Thanks for using the transfer element.
        </block>
    </form>
</vxml>

Extensibility: All three allow the call follow some concept of links to another VoiceXML / TwiML / PlivoXML document. However, VoiceXML has the concept of subdialogues, where control is transferred to another VoiceXML application, and the return value is passed back to the calling application. This can allow integration with (or development of) generic external services.

VoiceXML example:

<form id="billing_adjustment">
    <var name="account_number"/>
    <var name="home_phone"/>
    <subdialog name="accountinfo" src="acct_info.vxml#basic">
        <filled>
            <!-- Note the variable defined by "accountinfo" is
            returned as an ECMAScript object and it contains two
            properties defined by the variables specified in the
            "return" element of the subdialog. -->

            <assign name="account_number" expr="accountinfo.acctnum"/>
            <assign name="home_phone" expr="accountinfo.acctphone"/>
        </filled>
    </subdialog>
    ....
</form>

Examples based on / copied from Twilio's Docs, Nexmo's VXML Quickstarts, and the W3C's VXML Documentation.

  • Very thorough Tim, could you perhaps add some vxml vs twiml examples to address the development portion of the question? A hello world of sorts. – Ryan Mar 5 '15 at 21:22
  • Updated with some samples for each section. Note that VXML tends to be longer, but most of the time, it's also doing more than the TwiML (collecting multiple fields, accepting voice recognition as well as DTMF, etc). – Tim Lytle Mar 11 '15 at 23:59
  • @TimLytle - it would be very helpful to have a converter from these 3 differents XML, for instance, this would make easy to migrate from Twilio/Plivo to Nexmo. – Sibelius Seraphini Feb 5 '16 at 16:40
  • @SibeliusSeraphini at a basic level that could be helpful, but really transitioning to VoiceXML will likely reduce the number XML docs you need (as well as round trips to and from your server). – Tim Lytle Feb 5 '16 at 17:10
  • @TimLytle thanks for the reply, I think you guys could put examples of how to migrate from Twilio/Plivo to vxml, making easier to everybody that wants to migrate to Nexmo service – Sibelius Seraphini Feb 5 '16 at 20:14

Just to add one more option here which is Restcomm https://www.restcomm.com/

Please note that Restcomm also have voice recognition a.k.a Automatic Speech Recognition or ASR.

Besides Restcomm also comes with Visual Designer tool that allows to define the call flow via simple drag-and-drop feature.

Restcomm and Twilio, Plivo etc adds many features on top of VXML such as WebRTC.

All of these also exposes the SDK's so developers can develop Apps directly on top of Android or iOS.

The biggest advantage of these over VXML is simplicity of API. As developers you would want to focus on business logic instead of getting dragged into complex XML structure. API's exposing JSON is most powerful flexibility for developers.

Br, Amit.

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