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Is it possible to resize an image using FFmpeg?

I have this so far:

ffmpeg. -i 1.jpg -vf scale=360:240 > 2.jpg

I get the error message:

At least one output file must be specified

Is it possible?

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6 Answers 6

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+300

You can try this:

ffmpeg -i input.jpg -vf scale=320:240 output_320x240.png

I got this from source

Note: The scale filter can also automatically calculate a dimension while preserving the aspect ratio: scale=320:-1, or scale=-1:240

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  • Hi, beat you to it. It was what I just found. But, as you got the right answer and you gave me your time I give you a tick :) Commented Mar 2, 2015 at 11:03
  • 28
    The scale filter can also automatically calculate a dimension while preserving the aspect ratio: scale=320:-1, or scale=-1:240.
    – llogan
    Commented Mar 2, 2015 at 18:13
  • This results in a corrupt image for me. Just a bunch of lines and colors. jpg to jpg
    – Tyguy7
    Commented Nov 9, 2015 at 18:26
  • 2
    Interesting, png output works fine though. JPG is borked.
    – Tyguy7
    Commented Nov 9, 2015 at 18:27
  • What if I want to keep the output file name unchanged? Can I have a shorter command? Thank you.
    – Alston
    Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 3:22
38

If you want to retain aspect ratio you can do -

ffmpeg -i 1.jpg -vf scale="360:-1" 2.jpg

or if you want to resize based on input width and height, let's say half of input width and height you can do -

ffmpeg -i 1.jpg -vf scale="iw/1:ih/2" 2.jpg

where

iw: input width
ih: input height
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  • 3
    I found this very useful. It should be noted that the correct usage for cutting both height and width in half is -vf scale="iw/2:ih/2". Commented Jan 2, 2023 at 13:53
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It is also possible to resize an image to fit inside some dimensions and letterbox the rest.

Example command:

ffmpeg -i IN.png -vf "scale=1280:720:force_original_aspect_ratio=decrease,pad=1280:720:(ow-iw)/2:(oh-ih)/2" OUT.jpg

See this answer for more details.

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  • 1
    After a long online search and not knowing that this was called "letterboxing", this answer just saved me from a lot of hassle! Thanks so much!
    – kafman
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 16:22
  • 1
    Thank you, also the only answer I found online that correctly aspect fits multiple images
    – jjxtra
    Commented Feb 18, 2023 at 4:40
10

Thanks to @andri-kurnia 's answer.

This example also shows how to resize multiple images (in windows):

for %j in (*.jpg) do ffmpeg -i "%j" -vf scale=480:-1 "Small-%~nj.jpg"

This command will resize all .jpg images in the folder, sets the width 480 while keeping ratio, and add "Small-" at the start of the resized image name. And I think for some types, it may be necessary to use -2 instead of -1. For specifying the height, we can use something like -1:480.

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To reduce image scale to the bounding box of width:320px and height:240px.

ffmpeg -i src_image_path -vf 'scale=if(gte(a\,320/240)\,min(320\,iw)\,-2):if(gte(a\,320/240)\,-2\,min(240\,ih))' dst_image_path

a: aspect ratio
iw: in width
ih: in height

If the src image size is in the bounding box do no resize on it. If image has a big aspect ration than 320/240 and width is bigger then 320, resize width to 320 and keep the aspect ration. If image has a small aspect ration than 320/240 and height is bigger then 240, resize height to 240 and keep the aspect ration.

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Here is what I did processing all the images in a directory:

for i in *.jpg; do ffmpeg -i $i -vf scale="iw/2:ih/2" ${i}; done

Its kind of a combination from all of the above, in my case image batch processing occurs quite frequently, so you can run above code in your image directory which will lower all jpg file resolution to a half "iw/2:ih/2", which in my case will be efficient enough.

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  • @user151496: It is now. It’s been edited since I left that comment. (Thank you, John!) Commented Apr 25 at 20:56

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