15

There's more than likely going to be a duplicate for this question, but I'm struggling to find a precise answer for my problem.

The user enters a starting date for a client's rent (on a form on a previous page), then it needs to generate the next date (one week later) that the client is required to pay. For example:

$start_date = $_POST['start_date'];  
$date_to_pay = ???  

Lets say the user enters in 2015/03/02:

$start_date = "2015/03/02";  

I then want the date to pay to be equal to a week later (2015/03/09):

$date_to_pay = "2015/03/09";  

How would one go around doing this? Many thanks.

3
  • 2
    Yes! There are many, many duplicates: $_POST['start_date'] = '2015/03/02'; $date = new DateTime($_POST['start_date']); $date->add(new DateInterval('P1W')); echo $date->format('Y/m/d');
    – Mark Baker
    Mar 2, 2015 at 10:44
  • create date time from user input then add a week on it. For code see @MarkBaker 's comment Mar 2, 2015 at 10:44
  • check this link : stackoverflow.com/questions/6086389/…
    – jems
    Mar 2, 2015 at 10:47

5 Answers 5

27

You can try this

$start_date = "2015/03/02";  
$date = strtotime($start_date);
$date = strtotime("+7 day", $date);
echo date('Y/m/d', $date);
2
  • 1
    Sidenote: + 7 days is nice, but you could also just do + 1 week, just personnal preference..
    – Naruto
    Mar 2, 2015 at 10:52
  • 3
    One should note that this is a very poor method of doing this, strtotime returns seconds since epoch, you can simply add one week in seconds to the time and avoid the extra slow call to strtotime. $date = strtotime($start_date) + 604800; Sep 13, 2017 at 8:44
15

Please try the following:

date('d.m.Y', strtotime('+1 week', strtotime($start_date)));
5
  • So would I make $date_to_pay = date('d.m.Y', strtotime('+1 week', $start_date));??
    – jarnold
    Mar 2, 2015 at 10:59
  • Exactly, set as per your format Y/m/d. Mar 2, 2015 at 11:02
  • I'm just trying it again cos for some reason my $date_to_pay came out as 1970/01/07 lol
    – jarnold
    Mar 2, 2015 at 11:11
  • @bob Yeah I don't know why but for some reason it outputs the $date_to_pay as 1970/01/07???
    – jarnold
    Mar 2, 2015 at 17:07
  • @Jack, $start_date is meant to be a unix timestamp, see manual Mar 3, 2015 at 13:37
10

Object Oriented Style using DateTime classes:

$start_date = DateTime::createFromFormat('Y/m/d', $_POST['start_date']);

$one_week = DateInterval::createFromDateString('1 week');

$start_date->add($one_week);

$date_to_pay = $start_date->format('Y/m/d');

Or for those who like to have it all in one go:

$date_to_pay = DateTime::createFromFormat('Y/m/d',$_POST['start_date'])
                       ->add(DateInterval::createFromDateString('1 week'))
                       ->format('Y/m/d');
2
$start_date = "2015/03/02";  
$new_date= date("Y/m/d", strtotime("$start_date +1 week"));
2

You can use this:

$startdate = $_POST['start_date'];
$date_to_pay = date('Y/m/d',strtotime('+1 week',$startdate));

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