38

I've been using C++ for quite a long time now but nevertheless I tend to fall back on scanf when I have to parse simple text files. For example given a config like this (also assuming that the order of the fields could vary):

foo: [3 4 5]
baz: 3.0

I would write something like:

char line[SOME_SIZE];
while (fgets(line, SOME_SIZE, file)) {
    int x, y, z;
    if (3 == sscanf(line, "foo: [%d %d %d]", &x, &y, &z)) {
        continue;
    }
    float w;
    if (1 == sscanf(line, "baz: %f", &w)) {
        continue;
    }
}

What's the most concise way to achieve this in C++? Whenever I try I end up with a lot of scaffolding code.

4
  • 2
    Basically, you could read lines using std::getline(), put them into a string stream, and parse the individual lines from that, using whatever delimiter you want for subsequent calls to std::getline() on the string stream. Would this answer help you to get started?
    – sbi
    May 21 '10 at 9:50
  • @sbi :) I provided an answer using scanf on that very same question. It's not that I don't know how to do this in C++, the problem is that whenever I try I end up with something along the lines you're proposing. May 21 '10 at 10:03
  • I too have problems doing parsing the C++ way. Scanf is indeed horribly unsafe(but I use lint to check params), can be slow (string is always parsed) but as a quick "parser" always wins in terms of code size and effort :/ And yeah Spirit is great, but for larger problems imho. Or can anyone show us some elegant C++ way?
    – MaR
    May 21 '10 at 13:23
  • The problem is only a problem until you have your toolbox filled with the tools you need. I have filled mine >10 years ago and haven't missed much when doing simple parsing. A few functions like bool read_delimiter(std::istream&, char delim), template<typename T> T& read_value(std::istream&,T&), template<typename T> T& read_delimited_value(std::istream&,T&,char ldelim, char rdelim) aren't hard to come up with and can take you a long way towards a simple parser. Of course, when speed is a must, all this is to slow. But for reading simple config files, it's usually enough.
    – sbi
    May 21 '10 at 20:11
30

This is a try using only standard C++.

Most of the time I use a combination of std::istringstream and std::getline (which can work to separate words) to get what I want. And if I can I make my config files look like:

foo=1,2,3,4

which makes it easy.

text file is like this:

foo=1,2,3,4
bar=0

And you parse it like this:

int main()
{
    std::ifstream file( "sample.txt" );

    std::string line;
    while( std::getline( file, line ) )   
    {
        std::istringstream iss( line );

        std::string result;
        if( std::getline( iss, result , '=') )
        {
            if( result == "foo" )
            {
                std::string token;
                while( std::getline( iss, token, ',' ) )
                {
                    std::cout << token << std::endl;
                }
            }
            if( result == "bar" )
            {
               //...
    }
}
2
  • Your second call to std::getline() badly misses a check whether it succeeded. If it wasn't for this, you'd have my vote.
    – sbi
    May 21 '10 at 19:55
  • 2
    1 up for posting a std c++ response
    – Nelstaar
    Jun 4 '12 at 7:47
19

The C++ String Toolkit Library (StrTk) has the following solution to your problem:

#include <string>
#include <deque>
#include "strtk.hpp"

int main()
{
   std::string file_name = "simple.txt";
   strtk::for_each_line(file_name,
                       [](const std::string& line)
                       {
                          std::deque<std::string> token_list;
                          strtk::parse(line,"[]: ",token_list);
                          if (token_list.empty()) return;

                          const std::string& key = token_list[0];

                          if (key == "foo")
                          {
                            //do 'foo' related thing with token_list[1] 
                            //and token_list[2]
                            return;
                          }

                          if (key == "bar")
                          {
                            //do 'bar' related thing with token_list[1]
                            return;
                          }

                       });

   return 0;
}

More examples can be found Here

6

Boost.Spirit is not reserved to parse complicated structure. It is quite good at micro-parsing too, and almost match the compactness of the C + scanf snippet :

#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>

using namespace boost::spirit::qi;


int main()
{
   std::string text = "foo: [3 4 5]\nbaz: 3.0";
   std::istringstream iss(text);

   std::string line;
   while (std::getline(iss, line))
   {
      int x, y, z;
      if(phrase_parse(line.begin(), line.end(), "foo: [">> int_ >> int_ >> int_ >> "]", space, x, y, z))
         continue;
      float w;
      if(phrase_parse(line.begin(), line.end(), "baz: ">> float_, space , w))
         continue;
   }
}

(Why they didn't add a "container" version is beyond me, it would be much more convenient if we could just write :

if(phrase_parse(line, "foo: [">> int_ >> int_ >> int_ >> "]", space, x, y, z))
   continue;

But it's true that :

  • It adds a lot of compile time overhead.
  • Error messages are brutal. If you make a small mistake with scanf, you just run your program and immediately get a segfault or an absurd parsed value. Make a small mistake with spirit and you will get hopeless gigantic error messages from the compiler and it takes a LOT of practice with boost.spirit to understand them.

So ultimately, for simple parsing I use scanf like everyone else...

1
  • 1
    It ends up with compilation error: ../src/test.cpp: In function ‘int main()’: ../src/test.cpp:18: error: invalid initialization of non-const reference of type ‘__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >&’ from a temporary of type ‘__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >’
    – 0xC0DEGURU
    Jun 27 '13 at 12:12
3

Regular expressions can often be used for parsing strings. Use capture groups (parentheses) to get the various parts of the line being parsed.

For instance, to parse an expression like foo: [3 4 56], use the regular expression (.*): \[(\d+) (\d+) (\d+)\]. The first capture group will contain "foo", the second, third and fourth will contain the numbers 3, 4 and 56.

If there are several possible string formats that need to be parsed, like in the example given by the OP, either apply separate regular expressions one by one and see which one matches, or write a regular expression that matches all the possible variations, typically using the | (set union) operator.

Regular expressions are very flexible, so the expression can be extended to allow more variations, for instance, an arbitrary number of spaces and other whitespace after the : in the example. Or to only allow the numbers to contain a certain number of digits.

As an added bonus, regular expressions provide an implicit validation since they require a perfect match. For instance, if the number 56 in the example above was replaced with 56x, the match would fail. This can also simplify code as, in the example above, the groups containing the numbers can be safely cast to integers without any additional checking being required after a successful match.

Regular expressions usually run at good performance and there are many good libraries to chose from. For instance, Boost.Regex.

2

I feel your pain. I regularly deal with files that have fixed width fields (output via Fortran77 code), so it is always entertaining to attempt to load them with the minimum of fuss. Personally, I'd like to see boost::format supply a scanf implementation. But, barring implementing it myself, I do something similar to @Nikko using boost::tokenizer with offset separators and lexical cast for conversion. For example,

typedef boost::token_iterator_generator< 
                                boost::char_separator<char> >::type tokenizer;

boost::char_separator<char> sep("=,");

std::string line;
std::getline( file_istream, line );
tokenizer tok = boost::make_token_iterator< std::string > (
                                line.begin(), line.end() sep );

std::string var = *tok;  // need to check for tok.at_end() here
++tok;

std::vector< int > vals;
for(;!tok.at_end();++tok){
 vals.push_back( boost::lexical_cast< int >( trimws( *tok ) );
}

Note: boost::lexical_cast does not deal well with leading whitespace (it throws), so I recommend trimming the whitespace of anything you pass it.

1

I think Boost.Spirit is a good way to describe a grammar right in your C++ code. It takes some time to get used to Boost.Spirit but after it is quite easy to use it. It might not be as concise as probably you want but I think it is a handy way of handling simple grammars.Its performance might be a problem so it is likely that in situations where you need speed it might be not a good choice.

1
  • 2
    I've actually used spirit to parse very complicated structures but I think it's overkill for the given example, and will also need a lot of scaffolding code to set up. May 21 '10 at 9:42
0

I don't think any of the submitted answers are more concise than what the OP provided. Additionally, the submitted answers make the code less portable, slower to compile, and harder to read. If there are other aims (e.g. some specific safety or speed requirement) then the submitted answers may be more suitable, but given the aims stated in the question using sscanf is still the answer to beat.

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.