22

Can anyone tell me what is the type of the parameter for the function f?

int f(void (*(int,long))(int,long)) {}

I am getting a similar type to this in when trying to compile some variadic template heavy code (my own wrapper around std::thread)...

19
  • 16
    this kind of code should always be a part of C/C++ obfuscation contests. use a typedef.
    – vsoftco
    Mar 2 '15 at 21:29
  • 2
    @vsoftco - I get this from a compiler error
    – tohava
    Mar 2 '15 at 21:29
  • 2
    Run it through cdecl with 'explain'. There's an online one somewhere.
    – user207421
    Mar 2 '15 at 21:30
  • 1
    There's a parenthesis missing at the end, at least. Is this copy-pasted or retyped off the screen? If the latter, please copy&paste. The signature does not make a lot of sense with an added closing paren because it would declare a function taking a function (rather than a function pointer) argument, which I would not expect to see in compiler output.
    – Wintermute
    Mar 2 '15 at 21:33
  • 1
    That may be the case, but you're losing important information on the way. I'd have expected this to be of the form int f(void (*(*)(int, long))(int, long)) or so.
    – Wintermute
    Mar 2 '15 at 21:36
31

The declaration

int f(void (*(int,long))(int,long)) {}

declares a function f returning int and taking as argument a pointer to a function that takes int, long parameters and returns a pointer to a function that returns void and takes parameters int, long. Using a typedef for the innermost function pointer, this becomes more readable:

typedef void (*fptr)(int, long);
int f(fptr(int, long));

Or with a named parameter,

int f(fptr handler(int, long));

This is perfectly valid code, but it is odd to see in compiler output because it uses a special syntax rule: in a function parameter list, a function type declarator declares a function pointer parameter. That is to say,

int f(fptr   handler (int, long)); // is equivalent to
int f(fptr (*handler)(int, long));

...and you'd expect the compiler to use the lower, general form.

3
  • "This is perfectly valid code, but it is odd to see in compiler output because it uses a special syntax rule" Does this appear somewhere in (a revision) of the OP or just in your example?
    – dyp
    Mar 2 '15 at 21:49
  • 4
    @dyp int f(void (*(int,long))(int,long)) {} uses the function type; the pointer version would be int f(void (*(*)(int,long))(int,long)) {}
    – M.M
    Mar 2 '15 at 21:51
  • OP mentions that it's in compiler output in the comments to the question.
    – Wintermute
    Mar 2 '15 at 21:51
13

It's a function taking a pointer to a function that takes int and long as parameters and returns a function taking int and long as parameters and returns void. Probably a lot clearer if you use a trailing return type and name the function:

int f(auto g(int, long) -> void (*)(int, long));
5

In the function declaration

int f(void (*(int,long))(int,long));  

obfuscated form of function pointer is used. Let's start with basic to understand this code.

void (*f_ptr)(long);  

declares f_ptr as a pointer to a function that expects a long parameter and returns nothing.

As a parameter of a function this function pointer can be declared as

int f1( void f_ptr(int) );
int f2( void (*f_ptr)(int) );  

Both void f_ptr(int) and void (*f_ptr)(int) are identical as function parameter. Now changing the return type of f_ptr to pointer to void (void *)

int f1( void *f_ptr(int) ); // f_ptr is a function pointer that expects an int type and 
                            // returns a pointer to void    

int f2( void *(*f_ptr)(int) );  

Name of a function parameter can be removed and therefore above declarations will become

int f1( void *(int) );
int f2( void *(*)(int) );  

Now you can deobfuscate your original function declaration

int f( void ( *(int, long) ) (int, long) );    

as

int f( void ( *(*)(int, long) ) (int, long) );    

and you can place a name for function pointer

 int f( void ( *(*func_ptr)(int, long) ) (int, long) );  

So, func_ptr is pointer to a function that expects an int and a long type parameter and returns a pointer to a function that expects an int and a long type parameter and returns void.

2
  • Do you mean "to pointer from void", instead of "to pointer to void"?
    – Exascale
    Mar 3 '15 at 15:07
  • well explained ! May 16 '20 at 11:04

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