2

I would like to have a variadic function f(p1,p2,...) that memcpy() each of its arguments to a destination one by one. To save run-time overhead, I would prefer variadic function template over va_list,va_start,.... Assume that arguments are either basic data types (int, double, etc) or C-string. As you may expect, C-string arguments need to be handled carefully. I need to strlen() to get the length of the C-string in order to copy correctly. Consider the following code.

void f() { }

// template #1
template<typename T, typename... Args>
void f(T t, Args... args) {
    cout << "in f(T t, Args... args)" << endl;
    f(args...);
}
 //template #2                                                                            
template<typename... Args>
void f(const char* t, Args... args) {
    cout << "in f(const char* t, Args... args)" << endl;
    f(args...);
}

It works well for

int x = 3; f(x); 
f("hello");
const char* p = "world"; f(p);
string s = "stack"; f(s.c_str());

But for calls like f("hello") I would like my f() be clever enough to say "Haha, I know "hello" is a string-literal, const char _some_name_[6]. I would not be that stupid to call strlen(p) to tell me the length." So I add the following template specialization.

// template #3
template<uint8_t N, typename... Args>
void f(const char (&s)[N], Args... args) {
    cout << "in f(const char (&s)[N], Args... args)" << endl;
    f(args...);
}

With these three templates (#1, #2 and #3), the compiler(clang++) complains ambiguity off("hello") as

/*
t4.cpp:30:5: error: call to 'f' is ambiguous
    f("hello");
    ^
t4.cpp:16:6: note: candidate function [with Args = <>]
void f(const char* t, Args... args) {
     ^
t4.cpp:22:6: note: candidate function [with N = '\x06', Args = <>]
void f(const char (&s)[N], Args... args) {
     ^
t4.cpp:10:6: note: candidate function [with T = const char *, Args = <>]
void f(T t, Args... args) {
     ^
*/

Question: How can I make f() smart enough to distinguish between string literals (or const char []) and char *?

  • This may not be a great idea. Consider const char foo[100] = "bar"; f(foo);. – T.C. Mar 3 '15 at 4:34
  • It seems your compiler issue,gcc ok. f("Hello") output "in f(const char (&s)[N], Args... args)" – Ron Tang Mar 3 '15 at 4:40
  • @RonTang My GCC says otherwise. – T.C. Mar 3 '15 at 5:18
  • @T.C. My GCC 4.6 says ok. – Ron Tang Mar 3 '15 at 5:47
  • Have you found a solution to this problem? – MikeMB Jan 2 '16 at 19:07

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