40

I would like to take a database of say, 1000 users and select 20 random ones (ORDER BY rand(),LIMIT 20) then order the resulting set by the names. I came up with the following query which is not working like I hoped.

SELECT * FROM users WHERE 1 ORDER BY rand(), name ASC LIMIT 20

  • What exactly isn't working for you? – kgiannakakis May 21 '10 at 14:00
  • When I try order by rand() limit 3 on a database here of 1600 users I consistently get random results back. – vfilby May 21 '10 at 14:01
  • @vfilby: Yes, now try order by rand(), name asc and you'll see that it isn't sorted by name. – Josh K May 21 '10 at 14:05
60

Use a subquery:

SELECT * FROM 
(
    SELECT * FROM users ORDER BY rand() LIMIT 20
) T1
ORDER BY name 

The inner query selects 20 users at random and the outer query orders the selected users by name.

  • 4
    Awesome, two things. Why the T1 after the query, what's it's purpose? Second: Do you know if it's possible to use a subquery in datamapper? – Josh K May 21 '10 at 14:04
  • Ah, so you're casting that inner select as a new temporary table. Got it. – Josh K May 21 '10 at 14:06
  • 5
    @Josh K: Regarding your first question, it's called an alias. If you omit it you get this error: Every derived table must have its own alias. – Mark Byers May 21 '10 at 14:08
  • Yep, I just tried that and realized what it was doing. – Josh K May 21 '10 at 14:09
9

Beware of ORDER BY RAND() because of performance and results. Check this article out: http://jan.kneschke.de/projects/mysql/order-by-rand/

  • Agree, its possibly the worst performing query. – mhughes May 21 '10 at 14:50
  • Additional WHERE constraints put the RAND load on about at most 500 rows. This is not a huge table, performance is not an issue. – Josh K May 21 '10 at 17:55
9

Instead of using a subquery, you could use two separate queries, one to get the number of rows and the other to select the random rows.

SELECT COUNT(id) FROM users; #id is the primary key

Then, get a random twenty rows.

$start_row = mt_rand(0, $total_rows - 20);

The final query:

SELECT * FROM users ORDER BY name ASC LIMIT $start_row, 20;
  • I believe this should be the correct answer, simply because I think the resources might be lower than calling RAND() or using a 'subquery'. – Decoded Jan 21 '16 at 17:45
  • 4
    You would always get 20 consecutive users ("consecutive" with regard to their names), not 20 random ones. – Pharaoh Jun 7 '16 at 10:56
2
SELECT  *
FROM    (
        SELECT  *
        FROM    users
        WHERE   1
        ORDER BY
                rand()
        LIMIT 20
        ) q
ORDER BY
        name
2

Use a subquery:

SELECT * FROM (
    SELECT * FROM users ORDER BY RAND() LIMIT 20
) u
ORDER BY name

or a join to itself:

SELECT * FROM users u1
INNER JOIN (
    SELECT id FROM users ORDER BY RAND() LIMIT 20
) u2 USING(id)
ORDER BY u1.name

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.