5

When I am using the following query it works.

query = "INSERT INTO MLRL1_PSR_MASTER (PROJECT_ID,FROM_DATE,TO_DATE,TEMPLATE_ID,TEMPLATE_TYPE,UPLOADED_BY,PSR_SLABID) " +
        " select '"+projectId+"' , FROM_DATE , TO_DATE,'"+templateId+"','"+tempType+"','"+user.getUserID()+"', "+slabId+
        " from MLRL1_PSR_SLABS where SLAB_ID="+slabId+" ";

stmt = connection.prepareStatement(query, new String[] { "ID" });
stmt.executeUpdate();
stmt = connection.prepareStatement(query);

but if i use same query with getGeneratedKeys() like:

stmt = connection.prepareStatement(query, new String[] { "ID" });
stmt.executeUpdate();
ResultSet rs = stmt.getGeneratedKeys();

while (rs.next()) {
    masterId = rs.getInt(1);
}

I get an error

ORA-00933: SQL command not properly ended

stmt is java.sql.PreparedStatement, Code compliance is 1.6 and JRE is 1.7.67 Oracle Driver is odbc6 and database is Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.1.0

  • 1
    Print the generated SQL Statement and run it manually. I'm pretty sure you will see the error yourself. You shouldn't be concatenating user input in the first place, use a PreparedStatement instead – a_horse_with_no_name Mar 3 '15 at 17:12
  • Do you get the different behaviour with exactly the same generated string using the same concatenated (!) values - or are they different? Do any of them contain quotes or commas or anything else that would confuse the parser (which wouldn't be a problem if you were using bind variables)? – Alex Poole Mar 3 '15 at 17:25
  • @horse: Print the generated SQL Statement and run it manually: It runs smooth.. On my SQL Developer.@Aelx Poole: I know that I used prepared statement but in process to find out issue i tried without setXXX() and it is still not working. – sampopes Mar 4 '15 at 5:06
  • I can't replicate this. Which version of Java, which driver (and version), and which version of Oracle are you using? Is stmt a java.sql.PreparedStatement or something else? – Alex Poole Mar 6 '15 at 12:49
  • @Alex: stmt is java.sql.PreparedStatement, Code compliance is 1.6 and JRE is 1.7.67 Oracle Driver is odbc6 and database is Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.1.0 – sampopes Mar 6 '15 at 13:32
4
+50
ResultSet rs = stmt.getGeneratedKeys();

the JDBC driver will add 'RETURNING . . . INTO . . ' to the end of the query you provide in order to return the values ask for. In your case SLAB_ID, which is always generated for INSERTs, was specified because you did not specify your own columns. When the 'RETURNING ..' is added to the end of your query the resulting syntax is invalid giving you the error message.

ORA-00933: SQL command not properly ended

RETURNING . . . is only supported for INSERT...VALUES; that is, for INSERT statements that use the VALUES clause to provide the values to be inserted. Inserts that use sub-queries do not support that syntax.

See the syntax diagram for the INSERT statement in the Oracle SQL reference https://docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/server.111/b28286/statements_9014.htm#SQLRF01604

Note that the 'returning_clause' is only shown on the 'values_clause' line and not on the 'subquery' line.

The syntax you are trying to use is not supported.

You can read more in:

http://database.developer-works.com/article/16369238/INSER+INTO+with+SELECT+is+throwing+error

https://community.oracle.com/thread/1325790

-3

I think the syntax is not correct. You probably need to add 'VALUES' in your query. The insert query should look like - INSERT INTO TABLE_NAME VALUES ();

  • 1
    I think the syntax is right, the OP is using INSERT INTO table(...) SELECT ... FROM othertable syntax – Rubik Mar 3 '15 at 17:11
  • 2
    Syntax is correct. Speciall when I am saying it works without autogenerated keys. – sampopes Mar 4 '15 at 5:09

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.