1

This question already has an answer here:

Is there a fast, convenient way to get all the code typed into the python interpreter so far? E.g., if I type this into the interpreter:

Steven$ python
Python 2.7.5 (default, Mar  9 2014, 22:15:05) 
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple LLVM 5.0 (clang-500.0.68)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> print "hi"
hi
>>> a = [1,2,3]
>>> for e in a:
...   print e
... 
1
2
3
>>> print "bye"
bye
>>> 

I would like to get these lines:

print "hi"
a = [1,2,3]
for e in a:
  print e
print "bye"

marked as duplicate by Padraic Cunningham python Mar 4 '15 at 1:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • @PadraicCunningham, no, just the source code typed in so far, like in the example output – Steven Mar 4 '15 at 1:09
  • do you want the commands saved or to output them from the session? – Padraic Cunningham Mar 4 '15 at 1:12
  • @PadraicCunningham ideally I would like them output to a file, e.g., out.py – Steven Mar 4 '15 at 1:13
  • the dupe should have all you need. The second answer is nice if you are on a unix system – Padraic Cunningham Mar 4 '15 at 1:26
5

You can use the readline module.

Python 2.7.5 (default, Nov  3 2014, 14:26:24) 
[GCC 4.8.3 20140911 (Red Hat 4.8.3-7)] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> print "hi"
hi
>>> a = [1,2,3]
>>> for e in a:
...     print e
... 
1
2
3
>>> print "bye"
bye
>>> import readline
>>> readline.write_history_file('history.py')

File history.py will contain your history including the last 2 lines:

$ cat history.py
print "hi"
a = [1,2,3]
for e in a:
    print e
print "bye"
import readline
readline.write_history_file('history.py')
  • This works, but for some reason spaces in the output file show up as "\040". Easy enough to fix, but do you know how to prevent this from happening in the first place? – Steven Mar 4 '15 at 1:55
  • This seems to be an OSX libedit thing. Sorry, I don't know of a simple preventative fix for it. You could write your own save function that iterates over the available history and replaces '\040' with space. – mhawke Mar 4 '15 at 3:06
  • Does '\040' show up when you reload the history file with readline.read_history_file()? – mhawke Mar 4 '15 at 3:07
  • Super easy - it just plain works. TNX – SDsolar Nov 20 '17 at 0:44
0

The %history magic function should do it for you.

In [1]: l = [1,2,3]

In [2]: %history
l = [1,2,3]
%history

If you find you do this often consider using an ipython notebook.

  • This is what I would do myself, but it's worth mentioning that not everyone uses IPython. – DSM Mar 4 '15 at 1:10
  • ah, did not notice he was in non-i python. – dranxo Mar 4 '15 at 1:12
  • I get a syntax error when using this – Steven Mar 4 '15 at 1:16
  • right, it's a command in ipython (a very common python interactive interpreter stackoverflow.com/questions/12370457/… ). I haven't used the bare bones interpreter in a long time. – dranxo Mar 4 '15 at 1:22
  • fwiw: if you are in ipython, you can save your history to a file with the -f parameter, eg %history -f hist.py – dranxo Mar 4 '15 at 1:25

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