6

One of the best ways to make a question reproducible is to use one of the built in data sets. Using data(), however, is frustrating because no information about the structure of the data set is provided.

How can I quickly view the structure of available data sets?

7

The following function may help:

dataStr <- function(fun=function(x) TRUE)
  str(
    Filter(
      fun,
      Filter(
        Negate(is.null),
        mget(data()$results[, "Item"], inh=T, ifn=list(NULL))
  ) ) )

It accepts a filtering function, applies it to all the data sets, and prints out the structure of the matching data sets. For example, if we're looking for matrices:

> dataStr(is.matrix)
List of 8
 $ WorldPhones          : num [1:7, 1:7] 45939 60423 64721 68484 71799 ...
  ..- attr(*, "dimnames")=List of 2
  .. ..$ : chr [1:7] "1951" "1956" "1957" "1958" ...
  .. ..$ : chr [1:7] "N.Amer" "Europe" "Asia" "S.Amer" ...
 $ occupationalStatus   : 'table' int [1:8, 1:8] 50 16 12 11 2 12 0 0 19 40 ...
  ..- attr(*, "dimnames")=List of 2
  .. ..$ origin     : chr [1:8] "1" "2" "3" "4" ...
  .. ..$ destination: chr [1:8] "1" "2" "3" "4" ...
 $ volcano              : num [1:87, 1:61] 100 101 102 103 104 105 105 106 107 108 ...
--- 5 entries omitted ---

Or for data frames (also omitting entries):

> dataStr(is.data.frame)
List of 42
 $ BOD             :'data.frame': 6 obs. of  2 variables:
  ..$ Time  : num [1:6] 1 2 3 4 5 7
  ..$ demand: num [1:6] 8.3 10.3 19 16 15.6 19.8
  ..- attr(*, "reference")= chr "A1.4, p. 270"
 $ CO2             :Classes ‘nfnGroupedData’, ‘nfGroupedData’, ‘groupedData’ and 'data.frame':  84 obs. of  5 variables:
  ..$ Plant    : Ord.factor w/ 12 levels "Qn1"<"Qn2"<"Qn3"<..: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 ...
  ..$ Type     : Factor w/ 2 levels "Quebec","Mississippi": 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
  ..$ Treatment: Factor w/ 2 levels "nonchilled","chilled": 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
  ..$ conc     : num [1:84] 95 175 250 350 500 675 1000 95 175 250 ...
  ..$ uptake   : num [1:84] 16 30.4 34.8 37.2 35.3 39.2 39.7 13.6 27.3 37.1 ...
--- 40 entries omitted ---

Or even for simple vectors:

> dataStr(function(x) is.atomic(x) && is.vector(x) && !is.ts(x))
List of 4
 $ euro   : Named num [1:11] 13.76 40.34 1.96 166.39 5.95 ...
  ..- attr(*, "names")= chr [1:11] "ATS" "BEF" "DEM" "ESP" ...
 $ islands: Named num [1:48] 11506 5500 16988 2968 16 ...
  ..- attr(*, "names")= chr [1:48] "Africa" "Antarctica" "Asia" "Australia" ...
 $ precip : Named num [1:70] 67 54.7 7 48.5 14 17.2 20.7 13 43.4 40.2 ...
  ..- attr(*, "names")= chr [1:70] "Mobile" "Juneau" "Phoenix" "Little Rock" ...
 $ rivers : num [1:141] 735 320 325 392 524 ...
  • Very useful. Interesting to me that you asked and answered, as if to create a resource for later users (like me). A related question: if an OP puts in data other than as the output of dput, what is the efficient way to copy their data and create an R object, most likely to try to figure out an answer to propose. I struggle with read.table(file = "clipboard"). Tx – lawyeR Mar 4 '15 at 20:40
  • @lawyeR, that's the idea. I usually use read.table(h=T, text="<paste>"). – BrodieG Mar 4 '15 at 21:19
  • 2
    But I've grown tired of doing that so I'm lobbying to make using built-in data sets the default way of doing things. – BrodieG Mar 4 '15 at 21:19

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.