2

echo date("YmdHis") see like 20150305072946

It looks like integer, so i trying to record in mysql as integer.

Mysql column type int(20). Storage Engine is InnoDB.

I have this query:

INSERT INTO table_name (`DateTime`) VALUES (?)     
$stmt_insert->execute( array( trim(date("YmdHis")) ) );

In mysql instead of 20150305072946 see 2147483647

What need to correct to insert correct value?

  • Why are you not storing it as a DATETIME? What you are doing does not make much sense. – Sverri M. Olsen Mar 5 '15 at 6:48
  • I also use date("YmdHis") as part of url. Like domain/20150305072946/something-else/ If like domain/2015-03-05-07:2946/something-else/ appears not so good. Need to think .... – Andris Mar 5 '15 at 6:55
  • @user2118559: not an argument. In both, PHP and MySQL, exist date_format function, so you can store date as date and have this string in your URL. – panther Mar 5 '15 at 6:58
  • Yeah, but how something is stored is not the same as how it is used. Dates should ideally be stored as dates. Once you get the date out of the database you can do with it whatever you want. – Sverri M. Olsen Mar 5 '15 at 6:58
1

Int can't store such big number. Bigint is what you need.

BUT:
The best way is to save datetime as a datetime, there is no reason why to store that as a number.

  • Aim was to get faster processing. Supposed that int would be faster than datetime – Andris Mar 5 '15 at 6:50
  • @user2118559: no, as I wrote in the answer above. Store that as a datetime (or timestamp) and use index(es). Integer maybe seems to be a good choice, but isn't. Trust me. – panther Mar 5 '15 at 6:52
  • Excuse me for possibly stupid question. Now in the table column named Id is set as primary. Do i need also ADD INDEX(DateTime); Add index to column where i store datetime? – Andris Mar 5 '15 at 7:00
  • 1
    @user2118559: if there will be many rows and you will search by date, use index above the date column. If you will have there eg. up to 100 records, you don't need to do it. In general, above table can be more indexes. – panther Mar 5 '15 at 7:04
2

This is called interger overflow. This will set the max allowed number in the DB as below which is the maximum signed 32-bit integer

2147483647

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/integer-types.html

So you need bigint datatype for storing bigger integer

  • Thanks for answer. Idea to store as integer was with aim to get faster processing (to compare to varchar or datetime). If i store as bigger integer, would processing be same speed as integer (faster than varchar/datetime)? – Andris Mar 5 '15 at 6:48
  • @user2118559: save that as a datetime and compare dates as dates, not as number and strings. I'm not sure why you want to select, lets say, articles written in last 7 days when you store dates as integers. – panther Mar 5 '15 at 6:49
  • Well processing is a subjective matter. If you want the value in the select where ... then using index will make it faster. However its always better to save the date values as mysql native datatypes like date,datetime,timestamp. – Abhik Chakraborty Mar 5 '15 at 6:50
1

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/storage-requirements.html

You need bigint datatype for storing bigger integer instead of int

1

this is an minor Problem.

Change the datatype of your table column from INT to bigint. This will work.

Suppose if your table having column job_id int change it to bigint same like

Before

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `job_skills` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `job_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `modified` datetime NOT NULL,
  `created` datetime NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) 

After

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `job_skills` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `job_id` bigint(11) NOT NULL,
  `modified` datetime NOT NULL,
  `created` datetime NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) 

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