48

My code is here:

func stringFromTimeInterval(interval:NSTimeInterval) -> NSString {

    var ti = NSInteger(interval)
    var ms = ti * 1000
    var seconds = ti % 60
    var minutes = (ti / 60) % 60
    var hours = (ti / 3600)

      return NSString(format: "%0.2d:%0.2d:%0.2d",hours,minutes,seconds,ms)
}

in output the milliseconds give wrong result.Please give an idea how to find milliseconds correctly.

  • Since NSTimeInterval doesn't normally handle milliseconds but seconds, my question is why the "*1000", and it should always be 0. If your implementations manage milliseconds, it should be "%1000" instead, no? – Larme Mar 5 '15 at 7:44
  • ya, you are correct it must %1000. I want accurate timing thats why i work with milliseconds. – Lydia Mar 5 '15 at 7:49
  • Of course NSTimeInterval handles fractions of a second (e.g. milliseconds). It's a floating point type, not an integer. – Matthias Bauch Mar 5 '15 at 7:56
  • @MatthiasBauch,@larme ya but my problem is when i find difference between two timings ex: 1:36:22 and 1:36:24 (hh:mm:ss format), it gives 00:00:01 instead of 00:00:02. Thats why i thought it may the variation in milliseconds. – Lydia Mar 5 '15 at 8:14
  • I want a solution for that problem also. – Lydia Mar 5 '15 at 8:14

13 Answers 13

111

Swift supports remainder calculations on floating-point numbers, so we can use % 1.

var ms = Int((interval % 1) * 1000)

as in:

func stringFromTimeInterval(interval: TimeInterval) -> NSString {

  let ti = NSInteger(interval)

  let ms = Int((interval % 1) * 1000)

  let seconds = ti % 60
  let minutes = (ti / 60) % 60
  let hours = (ti / 3600)

  return NSString(format: "%0.2d:%0.2d:%0.2d.%0.3d",hours,minutes,seconds,ms)
}

result:

stringFromTimeInterval(12345.67)                   "03:25:45.670"

Swift 4:

extension TimeInterval{

        func stringFromTimeInterval() -> String {

            let time = NSInteger(self)

            let ms = Int((self.truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1)) * 1000)
            let seconds = time % 60
            let minutes = (time / 60) % 60
            let hours = (time / 3600)

            return String(format: "%0.2d:%0.2d:%0.2d.%0.3d",hours,minutes,seconds,ms)

        }
    }

Use:

self.timeLabel.text = player.duration.stringFromTimeInterval()
  • Thank you so much it worked for me – Lydia Mar 5 '15 at 8:18
  • Might need to add "% 24" for hours i.e. "let hours = (ti / 3600) % 24 – Gabriel Wamunyu Jul 17 '17 at 18:04
  • ms are wrong I've used ti*1000 instead otherwise I've always get 0 – Michał Ziobro May 30 '18 at 10:42
24

SWIFT 3 Extension

I think this way is a easier to see where each piece comes from so you can more easily modify it to your needs

extension TimeInterval {
    private var milliseconds: Int {
        return Int((truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1)) * 1000)
    } 

    private var seconds: Int {
        return Int(self) % 60
    } 

    private var minutes: Int {
        return (Int(self) / 60 ) % 60
    } 

    private var hours: Int {
        return Int(self) / 3600
    } 

    var stringTime: String {
        if hours != 0 {
            return "\(hours)h \(minutes)m \(seconds)s"
        } else if minutes != 0 {
            return "\(minutes)m \(seconds)s"
        } else if milliseconds != 0 {
            return "\(seconds)s \(milliseconds)ms"
        } else {
            return "\(seconds)s"
        }
    }
}
  • 2
    Jake this could be a great answer, but the calculus are not 100% correct: | 3599 returns -1s | 12601 returns 3h -29m 1s – Kqtr Aug 5 '17 at 0:55
  • 3
    I've suggested an edit that fixes calculus. Thanks again for your answer! – Kqtr Aug 5 '17 at 1:11
  • @Kqtr where is the edit that fixes the calculus? – Paul S. Oct 31 '17 at 23:58
  • @PaulS. No idea, it might have not been approved (yet?) – Kqtr Nov 2 '17 at 10:02
  • @PaulS. Turns out my edit suggestion has been rejected because it "deviates from the original intent of the post", but here is the link: stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/16940597 – Kqtr Nov 2 '17 at 10:08
16

Equivalent in Objective-C, based on the @matthias-bauch answer.

+ (NSString *)stringFromTimeInterval:(NSTimeInterval)timeInterval
{
    NSInteger interval = timeInterval;
    NSInteger ms = (fmod(timeInterval, 1) * 1000);
    long seconds = interval % 60;
    long minutes = (interval / 60) % 60;
    long hours = (interval / 3600);

    return [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%0.2ld:%0.2ld:%0.2ld,%0.3ld", hours, minutes, seconds, (long)ms];
}
12

Swift 3 solution for iOS 8+, macOS 10.10+ if the zero-padding of the hours doesn't matter:

func stringFromTime(interval: TimeInterval) -> String {
    let ms = Int(interval.truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1) * 1000)
    let formatter = DateComponentsFormatter()
    formatter.allowedUnits = [.hour, .minute, .second]
    return formatter.string(from: interval)! + ".\(ms)"
}

print(stringFromTime(interval: 12345.67)) // "3:25:45.670"
  • 1
    use formatter.zeroFormattingBehavior = .pad if you want to show zero – iLandes Nov 4 '17 at 14:34
  • @iLandes .pad does not add a leading zero for the most significant component (the hours in the answer). – vadian Nov 4 '17 at 14:44
  • @vadian It does for me iff zeroFormattingBehavior = .pad – idrougge Oct 15 '18 at 11:35
  • @idrougge Once again, not for the most significant component. In the example you won't get "03:25:45.670" not even with .pad – vadian Oct 15 '18 at 11:41
  • Aha, now I see what you mean. No, you won't get two-digit hours using .pad. – idrougge Oct 15 '18 at 12:01
10

Swift 4:

extension TimeInterval{

        func stringFromTimeInterval() -> String {

            let time = NSInteger(self)

            let ms = Int((self.truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1)) * 1000)
            let seconds = time % 60
            let minutes = (time / 60) % 60
            let hours = (time / 3600)

            return String(format: "%0.2d:%0.2d:%0.2d.%0.3d",hours,minutes,seconds,ms)

        }
    }

Use:

self.timeLabel.text = player.duration.stringFromTimeInterval()
  • Int((self.truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1)) * 1000) gives always 0 – Michał Ziobro Jun 15 '18 at 6:28
7

Swift 4, without using the .remainder (which returns wrong values):

func stringFromTimeInterval(interval: Double) -> NSString {

    let hours = (Int(interval) / 3600)
    let minutes = Int(interval / 60) - Int(hours * 60)
    let seconds = Int(interval) - (Int(interval / 60) * 60)

    return NSString(format: "%0.2d:%0.2d:%0.2d",hours,minutes,seconds)
}
5

I think most of those answers are outdated, you should always use DateComponentsFormatter if you want to display a string representing a time interval, because it will handle padding and localization for you.

  • 1
    That's true for 99% of cases. When NSCalendar.Unit which aren't supported by the DateComponentsFormatter are needed,( for example .nanosecond), then it get useful to use one of these methods. – valeCocoa May 20 at 23:15
  • Any example code? – Jordan H Aug 21 at 14:50
4

for convert hour and minutes to seconds in swift 2.0:

///RETORNA TOTAL DE SEGUNDOS DE HORA:MINUTOS
func horasMinutosToSeconds (HoraMinutos:String) -> Int {

    let formatar = NSDateFormatter()
    let calendar = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
    formatar.locale = NSLocale.currentLocale()
    formatar.dateFormat = "HH:mm"

    let Inicio = formatar.dateFromString(HoraMinutos)
    let comp = calendar.components([NSCalendarUnit.Hour, NSCalendarUnit.Minute], fromDate: Inicio!)

    let hora = comp.hour
    let minute = comp.minute

    let hours = hora*3600
    let minuts = minute*60

    let totseconds = hours+minuts

    return totseconds
}
  • 2
    so complicate for a simple problem. – iLandes Jul 4 '16 at 6:12
3

Swift 4 (with Range check ~ without Crashes)

import Foundation

extension TimeInterval {

var stringValue: String {
    guard self > 0 && self < Double.infinity else {
        return "unknown"
    }
    let time = NSInteger(self)

    let ms = Int((self.truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1)) * 1000)
    let seconds = time % 60
    let minutes = (time / 60) % 60
    let hours = (time / 3600)

    return String(format: "%0.2d:%0.2d:%0.2d.%0.3d", hours, minutes, seconds, ms)

}
}
2

swift 3 version of @hixField answer, now with days and handling previous dates:

extension TimeInterval {
    func timeIntervalAsString(_ format : String = "dd days, hh hours, mm minutes, ss seconds, sss ms") -> String {
        var asInt   = NSInteger(self)
        let ago = (asInt < 0)
        if (ago) {
            asInt = -asInt
        }
        let ms = Int(self.truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1) * (ago ? -1000 : 1000))
        let s = asInt % 60
        let m = (asInt / 60) % 60
        let h = ((asInt / 3600))%24
        let d = (asInt / 86400)

        var value = format
        value = value.replacingOccurrences(of: "hh", with: String(format: "%0.2d", h))
        value = value.replacingOccurrences(of: "mm",  with: String(format: "%0.2d", m))
        value = value.replacingOccurrences(of: "sss", with: String(format: "%0.3d", ms))
        value = value.replacingOccurrences(of: "ss",  with: String(format: "%0.2d", s))
        value = value.replacingOccurrences(of: "dd",  with: String(format: "%d", d))
        if (ago) {
            value += " ago"
        }
        return value
    }

}
1

Swift 4 Extension - with nanoseconds precision

import Foundation

extension TimeInterval {

    func toReadableString() -> String {

        // Nanoseconds
        let ns = Int((self.truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1)) * 1000000000) % 1000
        // Microseconds
        let us = Int((self.truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1)) * 1000000) % 1000
        // Milliseconds
        let ms = Int((self.truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1)) * 1000)
        // Seconds
        let s = Int(self) % 60
        // Minutes
        let mn = (Int(self) / 60) % 60
        // Hours
        let hr = (Int(self) / 3600)

        var readableStr = ""
        if hr != 0 {
            readableStr += String(format: "%0.2dhr ", hr)
        }
        if mn != 0 {
            readableStr += String(format: "%0.2dmn ", mn)
        }
        if s != 0 {
            readableStr += String(format: "%0.2ds ", s)
        }
        if ms != 0 {
            readableStr += String(format: "%0.3dms ", ms)
        }
        if us != 0 {
            readableStr += String(format: "%0.3dus ", us)
        }
        if ns != 0 {
            readableStr += String(format: "%0.3dns", ns)
        }

        return readableStr
    }
}
0

converted into an swift 2 extension + variable format :

extension NSTimeInterval {

    func timeIntervalAsString(format format : String = "hh:mm:ss:sss") -> String {
        let ms      = Int((self % 1) * 1000)
        let asInt   = NSInteger(self)
        let s = asInt % 60
        let m = (asInt / 60) % 60
        let h = (asInt / 3600)

        var value = format
        value = value.replace("hh",  replacement: String(format: "%0.2d", h))
        value = value.replace("mm",  replacement: String(format: "%0.2d", m))
        value = value.replace("sss", replacement: String(format: "%0.3d", ms))
        value = value.replace("ss",  replacement: String(format: "%0.2d", s))
        return value
    }

}

extension String {
    /**
     Replaces all occurances from string with replacement
     */
    public func replace(string:String, replacement:String) -> String {
        return self.stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString(string, withString: replacement, options: NSStringCompareOptions.LiteralSearch, range: nil)
    }

}
0

Here is slightly improved version of @maslovsa's, with Precision input param:

import Foundation

extension TimeInterval {

    enum Precision {
        case hours, minutes, seconds, milliseconds
    }

    func toString(precision: Precision) -> String? {
        guard self > 0 && self < Double.infinity else {
            assertionFailure("wrong value")
            return nil
        }

        let time = NSInteger(self)

        let ms = Int((self.truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1)) * 1000)
        let seconds = time % 60
        let minutes = (time / 60) % 60
        let hours = (time / 3600)

        switch precision {
        case .hours:
            return String(format: "%0.2d", hours)
        case .minutes:
            return String(format: "%0.2d:%0.2d", hours, minutes)
        case .seconds:
            return String(format: "%0.2d:%0.2d:%0.2d", hours, minutes, seconds)
        case .milliseconds:
            return String(format: "%0.2d:%0.2d:%0.2d.%0.3d", hours, minutes, seconds, ms)
        }
    }
}

and usage:

let time: TimeInterval = (60 * 60 * 8) + 60 * 24.18
let hours = time.toString(precision: .hours) // 08
let minutes = time.toString(precision: .minutes) // 08:24
let seconds = time.toString(precision: .seconds) // 08:24:10
let milliseconds = time.toString(precision: .milliseconds) // 08:24:10.799

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.