My question involves summing up values across multiple columns of a data frame and creating a new column corresponding to this summation using dplyr. The data entries in the columns are binary(0,1). I am thinking of a row-wise analog of the summarise_each or mutate_each function of dplyr. Below is a minimal example of the data frame:

library(dplyr)
df=data.frame(
  x1=c(1,0,0,NA,0,1,1,NA,0,1),
  x2=c(1,1,NA,1,1,0,NA,NA,0,1),
  x3=c(0,1,0,1,1,0,NA,NA,0,1),
  x4=c(1,0,NA,1,0,0,NA,0,0,1),
  x5=c(1,1,NA,1,1,1,NA,1,0,1))

> df
   x1 x2 x3 x4 x5
1   1  1  0  1  1
2   0  1  1  0  1
3   0 NA  0 NA NA
4  NA  1  1  1  1
5   0  1  1  0  1
6   1  0  0  0  1
7   1 NA NA NA NA
8  NA NA NA  0  1
9   0  0  0  0  0
10  1  1  1  1  1

I could use something like:

df <- df %>% mutate(sumrow= x1 + x2 + x3 + x4 + x5)

but this would involve writing out the names of each of the columns. I have like 50 columns. In addition, the column names change at different iterations of the loop in which I want to implement this operation so I would like to try avoid having to give any column names.

How can I do that most efficiently? Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

  • 9
    Why dplyr? Why not just a simple df$sumrow <- rowSums(df, na.rm = TRUE) from base R? Or df$sumrow <- Reduce(`+`, df) if you want to replicate the exact thing you did with dplyr. – David Arenburg Mar 5 '15 at 8:22
  • 6
    You can do both with dplyr too as in df %>% mutate(sumrow = Reduce(`+`, .)) or df %>% mutate(sumrow = rowSums(.)) – David Arenburg Mar 5 '15 at 8:38
  • 2
    Update to the latest dplyr version and it will work. – David Arenburg Mar 5 '15 at 9:11
  • 1
    Suggestions by David Arenburg worked after updating package dplyr @DavidArenburg – amo Mar 5 '15 at 16:01
  • 1
    @boern David Arenburgs comment was the best answer and most direct solution. Your answer would work but it involves an extra step of replacing NA values with zero which might not be suitable in some cases. – amo Sep 29 '16 at 11:29
up vote 51 down vote accepted

How about

sum down each column

df %>%
   replace(is.na(.), 0) %>%
   summarise_all(funs(sum))

sum up each row

df %>%
   replace(is.na(.), 0) %>%
   mutate(sum = rowSums(.[1:5]))
  • 5
    summarise_each sums down along each column while what is required is sum along each row – amo Sep 23 '15 at 8:55
  • I'm trying to achieve the same, but my DF has a column which is a character, hence I cannot sum all the columns. I guess I should modify the (.[1:5]) part, but unfortunately I am not familiar with the syntax nor I don't know how to look for help on it. Tried with mutate(sum = rowSums(is.numeric(.))) but didn't work. – ccamara Jan 11 '17 at 12:07
  • You could try to also replace all non numeric values with 0 using replace(!is.numeric(.), 0) %>% ? – Boern Jan 11 '17 at 12:20
  • 3
    I see. You might want to give df %>% replace(is.na(.), 0) %>% select_if(is.numeric) %>% summarise_each(funs(sum)) a shot? – Boern Jan 12 '17 at 8:19
  • 1
    Use summarise_all instead of summarise_each as it has been deprecated. – hmhensen Jun 17 at 23:27

I would use regular expression matching to sum over variables with certain pattern names. For example:

df <- df %>% mutate(sum1 = rowSums(.[grep("x[3-5]", names(.))], na.rm = TRUE),
                    sum_all = rowSums(.[grep("x", names(.))], na.rm = TRUE))

This way you can create more than one variable as a sum of certain group of variables of your data frame.

  • great solution! I was looking for a specific dplyr function doing this in recent releases, but couln't find – agenis Sep 20 '17 at 14:55
  • This solution is great. If there are columns you do not want to include you simply need to design the grep() statement to select columns matching a specific pattern. – Trenton Hoffman Jun 27 at 20:25

If you want to sum certain columns only, I'd use something like this:

library(dplyr)
df=data.frame(
  x1=c(1,0,0,NA,0,1,1,NA,0,1),
  x2=c(1,1,NA,1,1,0,NA,NA,0,1),
  x3=c(0,1,0,1,1,0,NA,NA,0,1),
  x4=c(1,0,NA,1,0,0,NA,0,0,1),
  x5=c(1,1,NA,1,1,1,NA,1,0,1))
df %>% select(x3:x5) %>% rowSums(na.rm=TRUE) -> df$x3x5.total
head(df)

This way you can use dplyr::select's syntax.

  • I like this approach above others since it does not require coercing NAs to 0 – Michael Bellhouse Nov 17 '17 at 16:42

I encounter this problem often, and the easiest way to do this is to use the apply() function within a mutate command.

library(tidyverse)
df=data.frame(
  x1=c(1,0,0,NA,0,1,1,NA,0,1),
  x2=c(1,1,NA,1,1,0,NA,NA,0,1),
  x3=c(0,1,0,1,1,0,NA,NA,0,1),
  x4=c(1,0,NA,1,0,0,NA,0,0,1),
  x5=c(1,1,NA,1,1,1,NA,1,0,1))

df %>%
  mutate(sum = select(., x1:x5) %>% apply(1, sum, na.rm=TRUE))

Here you could use whatever you want to select the columns using the standard dplyr tricks (e.g. starts_with() or contains()). By doing all the work within a single mutate command, this action can occur anywhere within a dplyr stream of processing steps. Finally, by using the apply() function, you have the flexibility to use whatever summary you need, including your own purpose built summarization function.

Alternatively, if the idea of using a non-tidyverse function is unappealing, then you could gather up the columns, summarize them and finally join the result back to the original data frame.

df <- df %>% mutate( id = 1:n() )   # Need some ID column for this to work

df <- df %>%
  group_by(id) %>%
  gather('Key', 'value', starts_with('x')) %>%
  summarise( Key.Sum = sum(value) ) %>%
  left_join( df, . )

Here I used the starts_with() function to select the columns and calculated the sum and you can do whatever you want with NA values. The downside to this approach is that while it is pretty flexible, it doesn't really fit into a dplyr stream of data cleaning steps.

  • 1
    Seems silly to use apply when this is what rowSums was designed for. – zacdav Feb 26 at 23:10
  • 1
    In this case rowSums works really well as does rowMeans, but I always felt a little weird wondering about "What if the thing I need to calculate isn't a sum or a mean?" However, 99% of the time I have to do something like this, it is either a sum or a mean, so maybe the extra bit of flexibility in using the general apply function isn't warrented. – Derek Sonderegger Feb 26 at 23:17

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