24

I have not worked in C# 6 yet but was wondering....

As the title says "What happens if the filter of an Exception filter throws an exception?". I guess the really answer is "The filter should be written in such a way that it never throws an exception.", but lets say it does. Will it be as if the exception happened inside the catch itself?

try
{
  throw new Exception("Forced Exception");
}
catch (Exception ex) if (MethodThatThrowsAnException())
{
  WriteLine("Filtered handler 1");
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
  WriteLine("Filtered handler 2");
}

Or

try
{
  throw new Exception("Forced Exception");
}
catch (Exception ex) if (MethodThatThrowsAnException())
{
  WriteLine("Filtered handler 1");
}

Edit: Interesting Example This section was removed because of a bug in alleged volatileread upon which the example was based. Further investigation is required

  • 2
    Kind of shows why Hejlsberg didn't want to include exception filters until now. – Panagiotis Kanavos Mar 5 '15 at 14:52
  • @PanagiotisKanavos maybe he just wasn't involved anymore. C# 6 has a few dubious features that don't seem like the team is playing it safe anymore. The release doesn't remind of Anders. – usr Mar 5 '15 at 21:50
  • 1
    There's a mention of this in a DotNetRocks show, start at about 48 mins - basically Mads says Anders said (paraphrased) "What do I have to do so I never have to talk about them again?" - about 49:30. – DaveShaw Mar 5 '15 at 23:06
  • @usr this release sets the stage for the upcoming functional assault - pattern matching etc. A huge effort but only a "few" visible features. Not dubious, their purpose becomes clear in a functional context. – Panagiotis Kanavos Mar 6 '15 at 9:45
  • My theory on volatileRead's output:There is no way that these guys have implemented a C# compiler, so the output that it shows has to be legit. I tried to think about how it must have been implemented. As the site allows different entry points in different sections (e.g UtitlitySnippet has test case names, I thought, it must be using reflection to invoke the Main (or other) method. I tried it in VS CTP6, and it gave me "Exception in filter condition" exception. Now that's super weird, Invoke() throws diff exception than a normal call :O – v1p3r Mar 6 '15 at 15:40
14

If there is an exception thrown within the filter, then that exception will be silently swallowed and the filter simply fails. This causes the original exception to go down the catch cases or ultimately end up being reraised upwards.

So the code calling the filter will not have a way to know that there was actually an exception within your filter method. Thus, it’s important to avoid conditions where an exception can be thrown to make sure that a filter doesn’t fail for this reason.

You can verify this using the following code on volatileread.com’s C# 6 beta interpreter:

public void Main ()
{
    try
    {
        try
        {
            throw new Exception("Original exception");
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
            when (Test()) // `if (Test())` in older previews
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Caught the exception");
        }
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(e);
    }
}

public static bool Test ()
{
    throw new Exception("Exception in filter condition");
}

This results in the “Original exception” appearing in the outer try/catch block.


Update

Since I didn’t understand the output from volatileread’s compiler when not using the outer try/catch block, I installed the MS Build Tools 2015 myself (which as of the time of this answer still uses if, not when) and tried it out. It turns out that when not using the outer try/catch, the “original exception” is still the one that causes the program to crash. So it’s not the filter exception. This seems to be a bug with volatile’s compiler.

  • If you are having trouble running the snippet on the site, make sure to check the box "c# 6 beta". Also an interesting read on the same site about this: C# 6 Exception Filters and How they are much more than Syntactic Sugar – v1p3r Mar 5 '15 at 16:25
  • This does not make sense since in my tests Test would throw the exception and that would be caught by the outer catch. I would rerun your code but for some reason volatileread.com’s C# 6 beta interpreter is not returning any results for C# 6 for me – Murdock Mar 5 '15 at 17:23
  • As you can see in the answer I gave. The second experiment gave a NotImplementedException. Which would mean your example would have to print "Exception in filter condition"? – Murdock Mar 5 '15 at 17:43
  • Also noticed, you need to change 'catch (Exception ex) if (Test())' to 'catch (Exception ex) when (Test())' as the syntax has now changed in the latest release. The volatileread site also seems to have upgraded to the latest version. – v1p3r Mar 5 '15 at 17:54
  • 1
    @Murdock I spent a bit of time getting the new preview compiler running on my own machine and it turns out that the behavior is actually consistent. So it seems that there is a problem with volatileread’s online compiler. – poke Mar 5 '15 at 19:43
4

You can try it out here.

As @Habib correctly indicates, the filter simply gets skipped and it's as if it never existed. From that point on, the catch clauses work as they always have. The example above demonstrates this.

However if you change the second catch clause to a type that cannot catch whatever is thrown from your method, your program will crash because of an unhandled exception.

Spicy detail (bug): if you call the method encompassing the try-catch via reflection and a when clause throws an exception then it will be this exception that is considered unhandled and not the original one. More information here.

  • This is not correct - "By having that 2nd clause that catches Exception it will swallow any kind of exception you throw from MethodThatThrowsAnException()" -. Exception in Exception Filter method will be ignored and it will only cause the filter to fail. The original exception is what gets propagated down. – Habib Mar 5 '15 at 16:21
  • 1
    @Habib: important distinction, thanks. I drew the wrong conclusion from the thrown Exception in the try-block. I've changed the wording of my answer and the accompanying example. – Jeroen Vannevel Mar 5 '15 at 16:37
3

Edit: The oddness seems to be caused by a bug in volatileread. Please refer to poke's answer. The experiments below can not be trusted

So I ran a few experiments that gave a few interesting results to shed some light on the issue.

Check using http://volatileread.com/utilitylibrary/snippetcompiler?id=7632

public void Main()
{
  try
  {
    throw new Exception("Forced Exception");
  }
  catch (Exception ex) when (MethodThatThrowsAnException())
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Filtered handler 1");
  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Filtered handler 2");
  }
}

private bool MethodThatThrowsAnException()
{
  throw new Exception();   
}

Prints out "Filtered handler 2"

public void Main()
{
  try
  {
    throw new Exception("Forced Exception");
  }
  catch (Exception ex) when (MethodThatThrowsAnException())
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Filtered handler 1");
  }

}

private bool MethodThatThrowsAnException()
{
  throw new Exception("MethodThatThrowsAnException");   
}

Prints out:

Unhandled Expecption: System.Exception: MethodThatThrowsAnException
at Program.MethodThatThrowsAnException() at Program.Main()

Another interesting output for

   public void Main()
    {
      try
      {
        throw new Exception("Forced Exception");
      }
      catch (Exception ex) when(MethodThatThrowsAnException())
      {
        Console.WriteLine("Filtered handler 1");
      }
      catch (Exception ex) when(MethodThatThrowsAnException2())
      {
        Console.WriteLine("Filtered handler 2");

      }
    }

    private bool MethodThatThrowsAnException()
    {
      throw new Exception("MethodThatThrowsAnException");   
    }

    private bool MethodThatThrowsAnException2()
    {
      throw new Exception("MethodThatThrowsAnException2");   
    }

Unhandled Expecption: System.Exception: MethodThatThrowsAnException2 at Program.MethodThatThrowsAnException2() at Program.Main()

So it seems like it tries to evaluated the first catch if it throws an exception it continues to the next catch. The first catch that does not fail and matches all conditions then handles the exception (BTW an exception of the type originally thrown in the try). However if the last catch that is of the type of the thrown error also throws an exception in the filter part then an Unhandled Exception is thrown of the type in the filter.

Edit: Note:

public void Main()
{
  try
  {
    try
    {
      throw new Exception("Forced Exception");
    }
    catch (Exception ex) when (MethodThatThrowsAnException())
    {
      Console.WriteLine("Filtered handler 1");
    }
  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
      Console.WriteLine("Caught");
      Console.WriteLine(ex);
  }
}

private bool MethodThatThrowsAnException()
{
  throw new Exception("MethodThatThrowsAnException");   
}

Outputs:

Caught

System.Exception: Forced Exception at Program.Main()

If you compare that with the second output... HOW THE HELL IS THAT POSSIBLE??? In the second example MethodThatThrowsAnException is thrown but in the last example "Forced Exception" is caught

  • "HOW THE HELL IS THAT POSSIBLE???" - That is because exception from Method (filter) is ignored. and it is the original exception that is getting caught. Exception from the method would be completely ignored, it will just cause the filter to fail. There will be no trace of Exception("MethodThatThrowsAnException"); – Habib Mar 5 '15 at 18:52
  • @Habib thats obvious but why. This seems inconsistent. – Murdock Mar 5 '15 at 18:58
  • It may appear inconsistent, but the purpose of the filter is either pass or fail. But I agree, the exception in filter method should be raised and not ignored/swallowed. – Habib Mar 5 '15 at 19:02
  • @Habib the purpose of a try catch is to catch the exception being thrown. Since this is MethodThat... it should be the one being caught. – Murdock Mar 5 '15 at 19:08
  • First thing is that exception from MethodThatThrowsAnException is ignored, completely ignored. Second, since the original exception is not caught in the inner catch block it is getting caught in the outer catch block – Habib Mar 5 '15 at 19:32
0

Exception raised in exception filter will be ignored and it will cause the filter to fail.

Exception filters are feature of CLR since v1.0. Eariler they were available with VB.Net an F#. As far as swallowing/ignoring exceptions in filter method is concerned, that is also a defined behavior and unlikely to change in recent future.


Original exception will move down to other catch blocks or will remain un-handled in case of not being caught by any.

Consider the following code example:

try
{
    throw new Exception("Forced Exception");
}
catch (Exception ex) if (MethodThatThrowsAnException())
{
    WriteLine("Filtered handler 1");
}
catch (IndexOutOfRangeException ex)
{
    WriteLine("Index Out of Range");
}

and the method:

static bool MethodThatThrowsAnException()
{
    throw new IndexOutOfRangeException("Index Out of Range");
}

Although the method is throwing IndexOutOfRangeException and there is a catch block in the caller code for that specific exception but the exception from the method will never make it to the caller. IndexOutOfRangeException from filter method will be ignored and since the original exception throw new Exception("Forced Exception"); from the first line isn't handled anywhere, The program will crash because of Unhandled Exception "Forced Exception".


In your first code snippet, since you have a catch block for base Exception, your original exception from the first line throw new Exception("Forced Exception"); will be caught and handled there. You will not notice the exception thrown earlier in the filter method.


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