32

Problem

We want to use Windows Active Directory to authenticate a user into the application. However, we do not want to use Active Directory groups to manage authorization of controllers/views.

As far as I know, there is not an easy way to marry AD and identity based claims.

Goals

  • Authenticate users with local Active Directory
  • Use Identity framework to manage claims

Attempts (Fails)

  • Windows.Owin.Security.ActiveDirectory - Doh. This is for Azure AD. No LDAP support. Could they have called it AzureActiveDirectory instead?
  • Windows Authentication - This is okay with NTLM or Keberos authentication. The problems start with: i) tokens and claims are all managed by AD and I can't figure out how to use identity claims with it.
  • LDAP - But these seems to be forcing me to manually do forms authentication in order to use identity claims? Surely there must be an easier way?

Any help would be more than appreciated. I have been stuck on this problem quite a long time and would appreciate outside input on the matter.

1
  • 2
    Can you use active directory federated services (ADFS)? If so, it can expose a claims aware authentication point that the windows security model natively understands. After the authentication, you can implement a custom ClaimsAuthenticationManager to fill in the additional custom claims that your application needs. If you can't use ADFS, ThinkTecture has a identity server that is open source. Mar 6 '15 at 16:26
22

Just hit AD with the username and password instead of authenticating against your DB

// POST: /Account/Login
[HttpPost]
[AllowAnonymous]
[ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
public async Task<ActionResult> Login(LoginViewModel model, string returnUrl)
{
    if (ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        var user = await UserManager.FindByNameAsync(model.UserName);
        if (user != null && AuthenticateAD(model.UserName, model.Password))
        {
            await SignInAsync(user, model.RememberMe);
            return RedirectToLocal(returnUrl);
        }
        else
        {
            ModelState.AddModelError("", "Invalid username or password.");
        }
    }
    return View(model);
}

public bool AuthenticateAD(string username, string password)
{
    using(var context = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, "MYDOMAIN"))
    {
        return context.ValidateCredentials(username, password);
    }
}
15
  • 1
    Yeah, if you generated your project from a template all you would need to do is add the AuthenticateAD function and modify the login action. Mar 6 '15 at 15:23
  • 1
    Take out authenticationMethod and cancellationToken. All you need is what is above in my answer. Mar 6 '15 at 17:09
  • 2
    SignInAsync used to be a helper method before SignInManager existed. The concept is the same, though. PrincipalContext comes from namespace System.DirectoryServices.AccountManagement. Add a reference to that in your project to use it. Mar 6 '15 at 17:35
  • 1
    No, it doesn't because it's a namespace dedicated to working with Active Directory, thus not related to ASP.NET Mar 6 '15 at 17:46
  • 1
    Resolve in what way? Should just be in the .NET framework assemblies by default. Right click "References" -> Add Reference -> search for "directory" Mar 6 '15 at 18:10
4

On ASPNET5 (beta6), the idea is to use CookieAuthentication and Identity : you'll need to add in your Startup class :

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddMvc();
    services.AddAuthorization();
    services.AddIdentity<MyUser, MyRole>()
        .AddUserStore<MyUserStore<MyUser>>()
        .AddRoleStore<MyRoleStore<MyRole>>()
        .AddUserManager<MyUserManager>()
        .AddDefaultTokenProviders();
}

In the configure section, add:

private void ConfigureAuth(IApplicationBuilder app)
{
    // Use Microsoft.AspNet.Identity & Cookie authentication
    app.UseIdentity();
    app.UseCookieAuthentication(options =>
    {
        options.AutomaticAuthentication = true;
        options.LoginPath = new PathString("/App/Login");
    });
}

Then, you will need to implement:

Microsoft.AspNet.Identity.IUserStore
Microsoft.AspNet.Identity.IRoleStore
Microsoft.AspNet.Identity.IUserClaimsPrincipalFactory

and extend/override:

Microsoft.AspNet.Identity.UserManager
Microsoft.AspNet.Identity.SignInManager

I actually have setup a sample project to show how this can be done. GitHub Link.

I tested on the beta8 and and with some small adaptatons (like Context => HttpContext) it worked too.

5
  • Hi hlyates, did this post answer your question?
    – jesblit
    Nov 6 '15 at 9:54
  • Does this approach still work for RC1? I gave you an upvote.
    – hlyates
    Jan 6 '16 at 19:28
  • 1
    Thanks for the approve! Yes this also works with RC1, there are however some naming changes to apply (for example Microsoft.Framework.OptionsModel becomes Microsoft.Extensions.OptionsModel).
    – jesblit
    Jan 7 '16 at 10:36
  • Looks like major changes are looming with it ASP.NET Core 1.0 RC2 down the pike?
    – hlyates
    Feb 1 '16 at 22:19
  • Yes! It changes too often now and RC was supposed to be stable, but they still make core changes... I'll wait untill RC2 is final before I make changes on my side.
    – jesblit
    Feb 22 '16 at 14:18
3

You could use ClaimTransformation, I just got it working this afternoon using the article and code below. I am accessing an application with Window Authentication and then adding claims based on permissions stored in a SQL Database. This is a good article that should help you.

https://github.com/aspnet/Security/issues/863

In summary ...

services.AddScoped<IClaimsTransformer, ClaimsTransformer>();

app.UseClaimsTransformation(async (context) =>
{
IClaimsTransformer transformer = context.Context.RequestServices.GetRequiredService<IClaimsTransformer>();
return await transformer.TransformAsync(context);
});

public class ClaimsTransformer : IClaimsTransformer
    {
        private readonly DbContext _context;

        public ClaimsTransformer(DbContext dbContext)
        {
            _context = dbContext;
        }
        public async Task<ClaimsPrincipal> TransformAsync(ClaimsTransformationContext context)
        {

            System.Security.Principal.WindowsIdentity windowsIdentity = null;

            foreach (var i in context.Principal.Identities)
            {
                //windows token
                if (i.GetType() == typeof(System.Security.Principal.WindowsIdentity))
                {
                    windowsIdentity = (System.Security.Principal.WindowsIdentity)i;
                }
            }

            if (windowsIdentity != null)
            {
                //find user in database by username
                var username = windowsIdentity.Name.Remove(0, 6);
                var appUser = _context.User.FirstOrDefault(m => m.Username == username);

                if (appUser != null)
                {

                    ((ClaimsIdentity)context.Principal.Identity).AddClaim(new Claim("Id", Convert.ToString(appUser.Id)));

                    /*//add all claims from security profile
                    foreach (var p in appUser.Id)
                    {
                        ((ClaimsIdentity)context.Principal.Identity).AddClaim(new Claim(p.Permission, "true"));
                    }*/

                }

            }
            return await System.Threading.Tasks.Task.FromResult(context.Principal);
        }
    }
3

Shoe your solution above pushed me toward a direction that worked for me on MVC6-Beta3 Identityframework7-Beta3 EntityFramework7-Beta3:

// POST: /Account/Login
[HttpPost]
[AllowAnonymous]
[ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
public async Task<IActionResult> Login(LoginViewModel model, string returnUrl = null)
{
    if (!ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        return View(model);
    }

    //
    // Check for user existance in Identity Framework
    //
    ApplicationUser applicationUser = await _userManager.FindByNameAsync(model.eID);
    if (applicationUser == null)
    {
        ModelState.AddModelError("", "Invalid username");
        return View(model);
    }

    //
    // Authenticate user credentials against Active Directory
    //
    bool isAuthenticated = await Authentication.ValidateCredentialsAsync(
        _applicationSettings.Options.DomainController, 
        _applicationSettings.Options.DomainControllerSslPort, 
        model.eID, model.Password);
    if (isAuthenticated == false)
    {
        ModelState.AddModelError("", "Invalid username or password.");
        return View(model);
    }

    //
    // Signing the user step 1.
    //
    IdentityResult identityResult 
        = await _userManager.CreateAsync(
            applicationUser, 
            cancellationToken: Context.RequestAborted);

    if(identityResult != IdentityResult.Success)
    {
        foreach (IdentityError error in identityResult.Errors)
        {
            ModelState.AddModelError("", error.Description);
        }
        return View(model);
    }

    //
    // Signing the user step 2.
    //
    await _signInManager.SignInAsync(applicationUser,
        isPersistent: false,
        authenticationMethod:null,
        cancellationToken: Context.RequestAborted);

    return RedirectToLocal(returnUrl);
}
2
  • 3
    Is Authentication an MVC6-only feature? It's not clear where that is supposed to come from and it's kind of a critical piece.
    – siride
    Feb 1 '16 at 21:29
  • I believe the "Authentication" is supposed to represent whatever class or domain context that is used to verify the username and password against the domain controller. Such as in the System.DirectoryServices.AccountManagement -> PrincpalContext().ValidateCredentials(username, password)
    – DtechNet
    Oct 12 '16 at 21:05
1

Do you know how to implement a custom System.Web.Security.MembershipProvider? You should be able to use this (override ValidateUser) in conjunction with System.DirectoryServices.AccountManagement.PrincipalContext.ValidateCredentials() to authenticate against active directory.

try: var pc = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, "example.com", "DC=example,DC=com"); pc.ValidateCredentials(username, password);

2
  • Thank you for your reply. If possible, could you please confirm that this suggestion is for ASP.NET5?
    – hlyates
    Mar 5 '15 at 22:05
  • No, I didn't realize you were asking about that specifically. I've never tried it on ASP.NET 5 and IDK if Directory Services is in .NET core, but you could use full .NET if need be.
    – rybl
    Mar 5 '15 at 22:10

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