13

I know FileNotFound is Checked Exception but though it is, only during the Run time this exception will occur.It is more like Arithmetic Exception(Unchecked).

Whether it is checked or unchecked the exception will happen only during runtime.

My Question is why we call the FileNotFound/IO/DB related stuffs as Checked Exception?

Please share me your valuable thoughts :)

2
  • ` Arithmetic Exception ` is unchecked? @Lathy – Nin-ya Mar 6 '15 at 9:54
  • 3
    Are you implying that there are exceptions which can happen outside runtime ? – John May 25 '15 at 8:40
15

Exceptions always encountered at runtime only, Difference is made when a exception is handled.

Checked or unchecked means whether it is forced to handle at compile time or it will only be identified when it is encountered at runtime.

If an exception is checked means compiler has way to identify whether the exception can occur or not. and whenever you compile it, you will be forced to handle a checked exception and by doing this chances of runtime exceptions will be reduced.

During file handling, compiler doesn't check whether file is present or not, it just check whether you have handled fileNotFoundException or not, because once you are dealing with a file chances of encountering this exception is very high and you should handle it in your code. for arithmetic Exception there is not way to find it during compile time. and thus it is left unchecked.

3

NullPointerException or ArithmeticException usually shouldn't happen in a finished, correct program. You can handle those just with checking before with if to see if you divide by 0 or an object is null and then you are sure this Exception will not be thrown. Every time handling those Exceptions can make the code less readable.

Now you could argue that you could do the same for FileNotFoundException by just checking if the file exists before doing anything. But many constructors or methods that expect a File also support String from which the file is created then. I guess it is a question of where you draw the line, if you always only have the File method and never also support String then I would have added it to the unchecked ones too I think.

In other words: if a FileNotFoundException is thrown then it can be the desired behaviour and drive the flow of your program, but NullPoinerException really shouldn't be used for that.

2

All exceptions can happen only during runtime :) The difference between the Checked and Unchecked exceptions is, that the compiler is forcing you to handle the checked ones or add them to the method signature, effectively forcing the caller to do the same (handle/rethrow).

2

They've let it be a Checked Exception because the user can possibly "recover" from this exception by handling it. For example, the user may specify a different directory in case this exception happened.

0

Checked Exceptions force users to explicitly handle them, they are used for 'recoverable' exceptions, where the user can handle the situation gracefully.

Let's take a FileNotFound - it is typically thrown when the file is not present and below is a related programming idiom:

FileInputStream fis = null;
try {
    fis = new FileInputStream(new File(""));
} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} finally {
    try {
        fis.close();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

The Checked Exception here forces me to declare it in a try/catch block, where I can close the fis gracefully even if there's an exception.

Now consider that FileNotFound is a runtime exception, the code hypothetically will look like below:

FileInputStream fis = null;
fis = new FileInputStream(new File(""));
fis.close();

Now if this throws a runtime exception - which you do not need to handle at compile time, your fis will not be closed gracefully and that is a resource leak.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.