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i'm totally new to Python. I use Perl a lot and heard that Python was often better at parsing text so I wanted to give it a try, but I can't figure out the easiest way to do this (For info, I already did it in Perl, but it took me several, slow and ugly loops):

I want to read a big file and extract blocks of text that are between two lines that start by the same pattern, exemple :

!NAME: "N0",                DESCR: "Netnt Etrnet"
!NAME: "cp0",              DESCR: "Cle R0"
!NAME: "slt R1",               DESCR: "RSt"
>>!NAME: "moe R1",             DESCR: "ASessor 1,bps"
>>!PID: A9-55
>>!VID: G0984981
>>!SN: SEDGH25443N51E
!NAME: "SDFGSDFG: FGT/0",       DESCR: "VFDFGX1"
!NAME: "JQFHF1",       DESCR: "VNQDF2"

Of course the ">>" aren't part of the text file, it's just to show what lines I want to retrieve.

So to recap : I want to print ALL the blocks (there are more of them in the file) where the first line of the block starts by "!NAME" and has other lines before the next "!NAME".

I don't care about blocks where there is two "!NAME:" in a row.

This is just the first step, later I will try to retrieve values of this block to create an hash (or dictionary or whatever is the equivalent of an hash in python). But I'm already stuck at the first step so i'm asking for help haha.

Thanks !

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  • python is better than perl at many things. Parsing text is not one of them. – William Pursell Mar 6 '15 at 12:04
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    Perhaps you should change the way to do it in Perl. – Casimir et Hippolyte Mar 6 '15 at 12:09
  • Perl is excellent for processing text. That's almost its raison d'être – Peter Wood Mar 6 '15 at 12:10
  • I get the comment that say Perl is doing good at processing text. Indeed it is and I never said otherwise. I said that I HEARD (from collegues etc.) that python can sometimes be better. So I wanted to give it a try. I don't get the downvote really... – user2407268 Mar 6 '15 at 12:17
  • That's what i'm doing right now. I'm taking a script I made in perl (which might not be optimized to the max, I agree), and try to convert it to Python. I'll do that with a couple more, that way I'll see by myself if one is better than the other (in my opinion) to do different kind of stuff – user2407268 Mar 6 '15 at 17:48
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with open("in.txt") as f:
    prev = ""
    for line in f:
        if not line.startswith("!NAME:"):
            print(prev.rstrip())
            print(line.rstrip())
            for line in f:
                if line.startswith("!NAME:"):
                    prev = line
                    break
                print(line.rstrip())
                prev = line
        prev = line

If you want each section stored, you can use a dict:

from itertools import count

from collections import defaultdict
cn = count()

sections = defaultdict(str)
with open("log.txt") as f:  
    prev = ""
    for line in f:
        if not line.startswith("!NAME:"):
            key = next(cn)
            sections[key] += prev
            sections[key] += line
            for line in f:
                if line.startswith("!NAME:"):
                    break
                 sections[key] += line
                 prev = line
        prev = line

print(d)
defaultdict(<class 'str'>, {0: '!NAME: "moe R1",             DESCR: "ASessor 1,bps"\n!PID: A9-55\n!VID: G0984981\n!SN: SEDGH25443N51E\n'})

To make sure you only find sections that have a preceding !Name, make sure the previous line started with !Name:

with open("log.txt") as f:
    prev = ""
    for line in f:
        if not line.startswith("!NAME:") and prev.startswith("!NAME:"):
            key = next(cn)
            sections[key] += prev
            sections[key] += line
            for line in f:
                if line.startswith("!NAME:"):
                    break
                sections[key] += line
                prev = line
        prev = line
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  • It appears the OP wants the first !NAME according to their >>'s in the post – Jon Clements Mar 6 '15 at 12:22
  • @JonClements, yep, I knew I had prev there for some reason originally! – Padraic Cunningham Mar 6 '15 at 12:28
  • Thanks, At first glance I think it's what i'm Looking for, even tho I got and error (print(prev.rstrip()) NameError: name 'prev' is not defined). I'll try to solve it and once I will i'll validate your answer :) – user2407268 Mar 6 '15 at 13:02
  • @user2407268, there is a line before the first time we see !Name so prev is never defined, I added prev = "" but using that logic there is a section that is not preceded by a !Name line – Padraic Cunningham Mar 6 '15 at 13:12
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    @Padraic hahaha... don't you know that all your imaginary internet points belong to me? :p (On a more serious note, I did @ the OP to have a look, but it was mostly because I thought you'd find it an interesting way of doing this...) – Jon Clements Mar 6 '15 at 13:36
4

Alternatively, you can use itertools.

  • Ignore everything in the file until the first !NAME
  • Group by whether the line starts with !NAME or not
  • Group that into pairs where the first pair is the !NAME line and the second pair is everything up until the next !NAME or EOF
  • Include in the output the last item of the !NAME lines, where it's followed by at least one line that isn't a !NAME

Code:

from itertools import groupby, izip_longest, dropwhile

with open('inputfile') as fin:
    stripped = (line.strip() for line in fin)
    start_at = dropwhile(lambda L: not L.startswith('!NAME'), stripped)
    grouped = (list(g) for k, g in groupby(start_at, lambda L: L.startswith('!NAME')))
    for name, rest in izip_longest(*iter([grouped] * 2), fillvalue=[]):
        if rest:
            print name[-1]
            print '\n'.join(rest)

Gives:

!NAME: "moe R1",             DESCR: "ASessor 1,bps"
!PID: A9-55
!VID: G0984981
!SN: SEDGH25443N51E
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  • @user2407268 haha... fair enough... wasn't understanding what you meant anyway... maybe just describe the logic you're trying to implement? – Jon Clements Mar 6 '15 at 14:26
  • New comment because old one was ugly, I didn't realize I couldn't indent text in here. So basically you made a dropwhile function to start only when !Name appears, but since later in the file there are lines I want to ignore, I replaced it by --- takewhile(lambda L: L.startswith("!Name","!VID","!PID","!SN"), stripped) ---- problem is I got an error saying that startswith takes 3 arguments max. Any idea to force the 4th argument anyway ? – user2407268 Mar 6 '15 at 14:27
  • @user2407268 str.startswith takes a tuple - eg L.startswith(('!Name', '!VID', '!PID', '!SN')).... – Jon Clements Mar 6 '15 at 14:43
  • @user2407268 I fear that'll break the logic though... the above is relying on ignoring every until the first "!NAME", then pairing up the is a name/not a name together... so while I'm still not sure exactly what you're trying to do - be careful with that one ;p – Jon Clements Mar 6 '15 at 14:46
  • Umm.... are you always looking for Name VID PID SN in sequential lines? – Jon Clements Mar 6 '15 at 14:47

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