13

I am trying to get the inner text of HTML string, using a JS function(the string is passed as an argument). Here is the code:

function extractContent(value) {
    var content_holder = "";

    for(var i=0;i<value.length;i++) {
        if(value.charAt(i) === '>') {
            continue;
            while(value.charAt(i) != '<') {
                content_holder += value.charAt(i);
            }
        }

    }
    console.log(content_holder);
}

extractContent("<p>Hello</p><a href='http://w3c.org'>W3C</a>");

The problem is that nothing gets printed on the console(content_holder stays empty). I think the problem is caused by the "===" operator..

28

Create an element, store the HTML in it, and get its textContent:

function extractContent(s) {
  var span = document.createElement('span');
  span.innerHTML = s;
  return span.textContent || span.innerText;
};
    
alert(extractContent("<p>Hello</p><a href='http://w3c.org'>W3C</a>"));


Here's a version that allows you to have spaces between nodes, although you'd probably want that for block-level elements only:

function extractContent(s, space) {
  var span= document.createElement('span');
  span.innerHTML= s;
  if(space) {
    var children= span.querySelectorAll('*');
    for(var i = 0 ; i < children.length ; i++) {
      if(children[i].textContent)
        children[i].textContent+= ' ';
      else
        children[i].innerText+= ' ';
    }
  }
  return [span.textContent || span.innerText].toString().replace(/ +/g,' ');
};
    
console.log(extractContent("<p>Hello</p><a href='http://w3c.org'>W3C</a>.  Nice to <em>see</em><strong><em>you!</em></strong>"));

console.log(extractContent("<p>Hello</p><a href='http://w3c.org'>W3C</a>.  Nice to <em>see</em><strong><em>you!</em></strong>",true));

  • Outputs HelloW3C - really what OP wanted? Not Hello W3C? – davidkonrad Mar 6 '15 at 13:28
  • 1
    No, white spaces are not required :) Sorry for not mentioning it! – Toshkuuu Mar 6 '15 at 13:30
  • Added a version that can add spaces between nodes. – Rick Hitchcock Mar 6 '15 at 13:41
  • delete span accomplishes nothing. – user663031 Mar 6 '15 at 13:43
  • @torazaburo, thanks, I wasn't sure about that. Edited. – Rick Hitchcock Mar 6 '15 at 13:49
16

One line (more precisely, one statement) version:

function extractContent(html) {

    return (new DOMParser).parseFromString(html, "text/html") . 
        documentElement . textContent;

}
  • nice answer +1, but what is the difference between your answer and Rick Hitchcock answer – Sharique Ansari Mar 6 '15 at 14:04
  • 1
    @shariqueansari, DOMParser is "experimental technology" but likely to be added to the spec. Its HTML support works in IE10+. My original answer worked in IE9+, but I've now updated it to support IE8. – Rick Hitchcock Mar 6 '15 at 14:53
  • 1
    DOMParser now has wide support, see caniuse.com/#search=domparser – Optimae Jun 29 '18 at 1:02
  • hoped this would work on nodejs but it doesnt. ended up using npmjs.com/package/html2plaintext – Flion Jan 14 at 8:57
3

textContext is a very good technique for achieving desired results but sometimes we don't want to load DOM. So simple workaround will be following regular expression:

let htmlString = "<p>Hello</p><a href='http://w3c.org'>W3C</a>"
let plainText = htmlString.replace(/<[^>]+>/g, '');
2

use this regax for remove html tags and store only the inner text in html

it shows the HelloW3c only check it

var content_holder = value.replace(/<(?:.|\n)*?>/gm, '');
  • 2
    Don't manipulate HTML with regexps. – user663031 Mar 6 '15 at 13:20
  • please give me a reason please? – Ahmer Mar 6 '15 at 13:23
  • 2
    stackoverflow.com/questions/1732348/… – user663031 Mar 6 '15 at 13:25
  • 1
    If you are going to use regexp, then a simpler version would be /<[\s\S]*?>/, or /<[^]*?>/. Your m flag accomplishes nothing; it relates to the behavior of ^ and $. – user663031 Mar 6 '15 at 14:03
1

Try This:-

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>
<script type="text/javascript">
function extractContent(value){
        var div = document.createElement('div')
        div.innerHTML=value;
        var text= div.textContent;            
        return text;
}
window.onload=function()
{
   alert(extractContent("<p>Hello</p><a href='http://w3c.org'>W3C</a>"));
};
</script>
</body>
</html>

  • Did you test this? It fails to extract "W3C" as it should. – user663031 Mar 6 '15 at 13:16
  • Please try your solution with the string Hello, <p>Buggy<i>World</i></p>. – user663031 Mar 6 '15 at 13:42
  • @torazaburo thanks, modified my answer. – Sharique Ansari Mar 6 '15 at 13:50
-1

You could temporarily write it out to a block level element that is positioned off the page .. some thing like this:

HTML:

<div id="tmp" style="position:absolute;top:-400px;left:-400px;">
</div>

JavaScript:

<script type="text/javascript">
function extractContent(value){
        var div=document.getElementById('tmp');
        div.innerHTML=value;
        console.log(div.children[0].innerHTML);//console out p
}

extractContent("<p>Hello</p><a href='http://w3c.org'>W3C</a>");
</script>
  • Right approach, but you don't need an element in the DOM to do this. Just create an element with var div = document.createElement('div') and proceed from there. – user663031 Mar 6 '15 at 13:12
  • Also, this will fail with nested HTML elements, such as <p>Hello<i>Bob</i></p><a>...</a>. It will retain the markup inside the p element. – user663031 Mar 6 '15 at 13:23
  • @torazaburo good point – Adam MacDonald Mar 6 '15 at 14:07
-3

you need array to hold values

  function extractContent(value) {
var content_holder = new Array();

for(var i=0;i<value.length;i++) {
    if(value.charAt(i) === '>') {
        continue;
        while(value.charAt(i) != '<') {
            content_holder.push(value.charAt(i));
            console.log(content_holder[i]);
        }
    }
}
}extractContent("<p>Hello</p><a href='http://w3c.org'>W3C</a>");
  • You don't need an array, if you want the results to be a string but having an array will allow the user to access each result/value. – NewToJS Mar 6 '15 at 13:11
  • 1
    You haven't fixed the basic logic error in the OP code. Did you test this? – user663031 Mar 6 '15 at 13:14
  • I'm going to guess "not" – NewToJS Mar 6 '15 at 20:25

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