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I am not clear on what the situation is when an activity is "destroyed" by the OS.

Let me explain why - in the diagram of the activity lifecycle here: http://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/Activity.html

There is an arrow going directly from onStop() to 'App process killed' then an arrow from 'App process killed' to OnCreate().

This diagram therefore shows that onDestroy() is NOT called if the OS kills the activity due to memory constraints etc.

However in the description of the lifecycle the word "destroy" is used many times. For example the following quote from this page: http://developer.android.com/training/basics/activity-lifecycle/recreating.html

The system may also destroy your activity if it's currently stopped and hasn't been used in a long time or the foreground activity requires more resources so the system must shut down background processes to recover memory.

So the documentation is saying the activity is destroyed yet in the diagram the arrow goes from onStop() to onCreate() and bypasses onDestroy(). This is why I am confused as it is apparently a contradiction.

If I have an activity which creates some objects in its onCreate() method and I set them to null in onDestroy() but onDestroy() is not called if the app moves from onStop() to onCreate() then won't I have a memory leak as they will get created again in onCreate()?

I can't set them to null in onStop() because then if the lifecycle moves from onStop() to onRestart() to onStart() they will be null.

Therefore how does one deal with the correct sequence of creating and destroying of child objects within an activity in order to deal with all paths in the lifecycle diagram? Is it necessary within onCreate() to only create the objects if they are null and not otherwise?

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    "then won't I have a memory leak as they will get created again in onCreate()?" - This would not be a memory leak, it would simply be redundant creation. The past instances' objects would be GC'd. A true leak would only take place if you were maintaining persistent references to all the objects created by all past instances of your activity (e.g. you are stuffing everything into a static List somewhere, and that would certainly be a very problematic / inefficient pattern) – Mike Repass Mar 6 '15 at 16:40
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This diagram therefore shows that onDestroy() is NOT called if the OS kills the activity due to memory constraints etc.

The arrow in question is labeled "Apps with higher priority need memory". Hence, this diagram shows that onDestroy() is not called if the OS terminates the process because apps with higher priority need memory. Android will terminate the app's process more gently in other cases, and in those cases, Android will take the time to call onDestroy() on your activities. onDestroy() is also called in other scenarios, such as finish(), the default behavior of the BACK button, the default behavior on a configuration change, etc.

If I have an activity which creates some objects in its onCreate() method and I set them to null in onDestroy() but onDestroy() is not called if the app moves from onStop() to onCreate() then won't I have a memory leak as they will get created again in onCreate()?

No, because the whole process is terminated "if the app moves from onStop() to onCreate()". Android does not destroy individual activities due to low memory conditions, despite some statements in the documentation to the contrary.

Therefore how does one deal with the correct sequence of creating and destroying of child objects within an activity in order to deal with all paths in the lifecycle diagram?

Lots of things should be cleaned up in or before onStop(). Specifically, anything that you're doing that may cause the user to regret having installed your app, such as requesting GPS fixes, should be considered for cleanup in onPause() or onStop().

For those things that you determine properly should be cleaned up in onDestroy(), do so. AFAIK, there are only three possibilities:

  1. You are called with onDestroy() and can do your cleanup work

  2. Your process is terminated, in which case your cleanup work is no longer needed or possible

  3. You crashed with an unhandled exception, in which case Android is not guaranteed to call any more lifecycle methods (moral of this story: use good exception handlers)

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  • Thanks, can you clarify the difference between "terminated" as in "the whole process is terminated" and "destroyed" – Gruntcakes Mar 6 '15 at 17:22
  • @MrH: When you see "destroyed" in the docs, that means the component is being called with onDestroy(), then being let go, hopefully to be garbage-collected. "Terminated" is a standard term with respect to OS processes and their state, not unique to Android. – CommonsWare Mar 6 '15 at 17:55

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