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I have seen a lot of specific questions and answers to variants of this message and all are only applicable to that specific situation. I am curious as to the general solution for when a UnsatisfiedLinkError is thrown. What does it mean? What is it not finding? The .java file? Did I miss linking to it somewhere? The one I am getting is thrown during the initialization process.

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    UnsatisfiedLinkError - Thrown if the Java Virtual Machine cannot find an appropriate native-language definition (read as: "dll", "so") of a method declared native. Mar 6, 2015 at 23:30
  • @user2864740 And is this usually a problem in the code or a problem in the project settings? Mar 6, 2015 at 23:36
  • "Environment settings" - e.g. the DLL (or SO) cannot be found or is an invalid bitness Mar 7, 2015 at 2:27

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I am curious as to the general solution for when a UnsatisfiedLinkError is thrown.

General solution:

1) read the exception message.

2) work out which native library or native method is missing

3) provide the required library and/or configure the JVM so that it can find it.

Beyond that, the details are case and / or platform specific. Some of the possibilities include:

  • You are either missing a native library (e.g. a ".so", a ".dll").
  • The JVM can't find the native library, 'cos it isn't in the places whete the JVM is looking.
  • The native library is not the right version; e.g. it doesn't implement the specific native method,
  • The native library is 64 bit and you need 32 bit, or vice versa. (A 32 bit JVM requires 32 bit libraries, even on a 64 bit platform.)

What does it mean?

The javadoc of UnsatisfiedLinkError says:

"Thrown if the Java Virtual Machine cannot find an appropriate native-language definition of a method declared native."

That is all we can say for certain ... in the general case, which is what you are asking about.

What is it not finding?

See above.

The .java file?

Nope.

Did I miss linking to it somewhere?

Probably, nope. It depends what you mean by "linking to it".

The one I am getting is thrown during the initialization process.

That is typical. The JVM needs to bind native methods during class linking ... which typically happens during application startup.

And is this usually a problem in the code or a problem in the project settings?

It could be either. Or something else. It also depends on where you draw the boundary of "the code". Do you include 3rd-party dependencies?

If the native method declaration is not part of the code that >>you<< wrote, then it is probably related to some 3rd party library that you are using directly or indirectly from your code. But there should be clues in the exception message and stacktrace.

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