10

Let's consider this simple testing code.

(Note: assertSomething is super simple here, but normally I'd write a more specialised helper for the task at hand that would look at multiple things and could report more than one type of error.)

package hello

import "testing"

func TestFoo(t *testing.T) {
    assertSomething(t, 2+2 == 4) // line 6
    assertSomething(t, 2+3 == 6) // line 7
}

func assertSomething(t *testing.T, expected bool) {
    if !expected {
        t.Error("Something's not right") // line 12
    }
}

When I run go test, I get the following:

--- FAIL: TestFoo (0.00s)
    hello.go:12: Something's not right
FAIL
exit status 1
FAIL    kos/hello   0.008s

I have two questions:

1) The error points to line 12 - why? How does t.Error find out which line it was called from?

2) In the helper, I'd like to specify that t.Error should look stack level higher to determine the line number to print, so that I would get a message like this:

--- FAIL: TestFoo (0.00s)
    hello.go:7: Something's not right

Python allows me to do this, for instance, in warnings.warn("message", stacklevel=2) - how would I implement the equivalent here?

  • As far as 1 is concerned, it likely uses runtime.Caller for this purpose. Supply a different number for skip to go up some levels. I am not sure you can tell test.XXX to do this without changing the test package code. – jimt Mar 7 '15 at 0:35
10

Things have changed since go 1.9.

Helper() method has been added to testing.T and testing.B. It's intended to be invoked from testing helpers such as assertSomething to indicate the function is a helper and we're not interested in line numbers coming from it.

package main

import "testing"

func TestFoo(t *testing.T) {
    assertSomething(t, 2+2 == 4) // line 6
    assertSomething(t, 2+3 == 6) // line 7
}

func assertSomething(t *testing.T, expected bool) {
    if !expected {
        t.Helper()
        t.Error("Something's not right") // line 12
    }
}

The output contains correct line numbers:

=== RUN   TestFoo
--- FAIL: TestFoo (0.00s)
    main.go:7: Something's not right
FAIL

You can also try it on Go Playground.

  • Very very nice! Thanks for info. Also not such bad design from Go side :P – Dawid Drozd Nov 14 '18 at 10:45
12

You can do what you're asking, and you can find out how t.Error works by looking at the source code. The function decorate is what you're looking for I think.

But, in the case where you have significant amounts of checking code, and for some reason it's getting duplicated in your test, it's better to extract that as a function that returns an error than passing in a testing.T and making it an "assertion". Indeed, writing assertion functions is explicitly discouraged in the language FAQ.

package hello

import "testing"

func TestFoo(t *testing.T) {
    if err := checkSomething(2+2 == 4); err != nil {
        t.Errorf("2+2=4 failed: %s", err)
    }
    if err := checkSomething(2+3 == 6); err != nil {
        t.Errorf("2+3=6 failed: %s", err)
    }
}

func checkSomething(v bool) error {
    if !v {
        return errors.New("something's not right")
    }
    return nil
}

But here's what I think idiomatic testing code would look like. It's table-driven, and the cases include inputs and expected output, leading to really clear error messages when the tests fail.

package hello

import "testing"

func TestFoo(t *testing.T) {
    cases := []struct {
        a, b, want int
    }{
        {2, 2, 4},
        {2, 3, 6},
    }
    for _, c := range cases {
        if got := operation(c.a, c.b); got != c.want {
            t.Errorf("operation(%d, %d) = %d, want %d", c.a, c.b, got, c.want)
        }
    }
}

func operation(a, b int) int {
    return a + b
}
  • Wow, thanks. And for testing stateful async code, is there a more idiomatic approach than "put something in one channel, assert there's something at another channel, repeat"? Any examples I can refer to? I don't think I can write that table-driven. – Kos Mar 8 '15 at 9:37
  • Alas, more complex test helpers (not assertions) are useful and need to adjust the call level for exactly the reasons documented in that FAQ entry - if they perform multiple checks, they should be able to add multiple failures. The magic to add the call site is unfortunately buried in an unexported helper (the decorate method), so adding this feature requires a fair chunk of duplication or an alternative testing library. As an example, you may want to repeat the same series of tests on several objects implementing an interface – stub Aug 8 '17 at 12:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.