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What is the problem in this code ? It shows memory dump error in runtime

#include<iostream>
using namespace std ;
int main()
{
    int A[3][4] = {{3, 1, 8, 11}, {4, 12, 9, 10}, {7, 5, 2, 6}};
    int **p = A;
    P[1][2] = 99;
    cout<<A[1][2] ;
}
  • An int** is not a 2 dimensional array. Second, that code shouldn't have compiled successfully. ideone.com/mKv3xv – PaulMcKenzie Mar 7 '15 at 4:45
  • 1
    int mian?? This cannot be your real code. – PaulMcKenzie Mar 7 '15 at 4:48
  • Surely it doesn't compile? Even if you fix the spelling of main, and change one of p and P to match the other, there's no valid conversion from int[3][4] to int**. Please post the actual code you're running. – Mike Seymour Mar 7 '15 at 4:48
  • Hey go easy on the dude he is obviously a noob to programming – T.Malo Mar 7 '15 at 7:00
  • Sorry , slip of fingers ! It should be -int main .yeah , i just start C++. I came to know that 2D array actually is an pointer array whose every element is pointing to an 1D array. That's why i use **p . Whatever thanks everybody – Ridowan Ahmed Mar 9 '15 at 15:47
1

Change your int **p = A[0][0] to int *p = &A[0][0]. In the next line, write the following *p = *((int*)p + 1 * NUM_OF_COLUMNS + 2) = 99;, where NUM_OF_COLUMNS is the number 4, instead of the P[1][2] = 99;. Correct the spelling of main as well as uppercase/lowercase of variables. Also add a return 0; at the end since you have an int main() and not a void.

  • The main function need not return a value. It is a "special" function in that it will return 0 if no return value is specified. In any event, it is int main() regardless, even if there is no return value. – PaulMcKenzie Mar 7 '15 at 5:21
  • @PaulMcKenzie you completely correct of course. But assuming he or she is not coding on an ancient UNIX box from the 70's than that is fine, otherwise there may be undefined consequences :) – Pita Mar 7 '15 at 5:35
0

you seem new to c++ or programming with a question like this one don't feel bad because pointers can be tricky and if you don't know you don't know. I am pretty sure this will help you. Remember to pick the best answer :).

 #include <iostream>
    using namespace std;
    int main() {
        int A[3][4] = { { 3, 1, 8, 11 }, { 4, 12, 9, 10 }, { 7, 5, 2, 6 } };
        cout << "Before pointer change A[1][2] = " << A[1][2] << endl;

        int *p;       //Set pointer 
        p = &A[1][2]; //Set memory address to pointer don't forget '&'
        *p = 99;      //Change integer

        cout << "After pointer change  A[1][2] = " << A[1][2] << endl;

        return 0; // you need a 'return 0;' because your main is int
    }

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