16

Is there any way to make a complete copy of a type so that they can be distinguished in template deduction context? Take the example:

#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
struct test
{
    static int c()
    { 
        static int t = 0;
        return t++;
    }
};

typedef int handle;

int main()
{
    std::cout << test<int>::c() << std::endl;
    std::cout << test<handle>::c() << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Since typedef only makes an alias for a type, this prints 0, 1 instead of the desired 0, 0. Is there any workaround for this?

1
11

Quoting cplusplus.com,

Note that neither typedef nor using create new distinct data types. They only create synonyms of existing types. That means that the type of myword above, declared with type WORD, can as well be considered of type unsigned int; it does not really matter, since both are actually referring to the same type.

Since int and handle are one and the same, the output 0 1 is expected.

There's a workaround though, as @interjay suggests.

You can use BOOST_STRONG_TYPEDEF.

BOOST_STRONG_TYPEDEF( int , handle );
18
  • 2
    The question is to find an alternative to typedef that won't have this behavior.
    – interjay
    Mar 7 '15 at 15:58
  • 2
    There isn't one built into the language, but that doesn't mean one can't be built (e.g. the link I posted above).
    – interjay
    Mar 7 '15 at 16:02
  • 1
    Yes I was aware that typedef doesn't provide the desired behavior. The link looks very promising!
    – Veritas
    Mar 7 '15 at 16:13
  • 1
    BOOST_STRONG_TYPEDEF has two problems. It doesn't work for user-defined types and multiple typedefs of the same primitive are not distinguished in template deductions. I wrote an answer addressing these problems.
    – Veritas
    Mar 8 '15 at 18:58
  • 1
    @shauryachats actually I think I missclicked somewhere. Back to accepted!
    – Veritas
    Mar 9 '15 at 9:02
5

Either as suggested BOOST_STRONG_TYPEDEF

template<typename>
struct test {
    static int c() {
        static int t = 0;
        return t++ ;
    } 
};

//Instead of 
//typedef int handle

BOOST_STRONG_TYPEDEF(int , handle) ;  

int main() {

    std::cout << test<int>::c() << std::endl
    std::cout << test<handle>::c() << std::endl ;
    return 0;
}

Output : 0 0 , because handle is not int but a type implicitly convertable to int .

if you don't want to use BOOST_STRONG_TYPE then simply add second parameter to your class template :

template<typename, unsigned int N>
struct test {
    static int c() {
        static int t = 0;
        return t++ ;
    }

};

Thus making test<int, 0> and test<handle, 1> different types

int main() {

    std::cout << test<int, 0>::c() << std::endl ;
    std::cout << test<handle,1>::c() << std::endl ;
    return 0;
} 

Output : 0 0

You can also add macro to generate your types :

#define DEFINE_TEST_TYPE(type) \
typedef test<type, __COUNTER__> test_##type;


template<typename, unsigned int N>
struct test {    
     static int c() {
        static int t = 0;
        return t++ ;   
    }
};

typedef int handle ;

DEFINE_TEST_TYPE(int) ;
DEFINE_TEST_TYPE(handle) ;

int main() {
    std::cout << test_int::c() << std::endl ;
    std::cout << test_handle::c() << std::endl ;
    return 0;
}
1
  • Regarding your now-deleted question abour your open-source project, you could ask that on relevant Reddit communities. If you do ask it in more than one sub though, do ensure you declare your cross-posting, so people can avoid making duplicate answers.
    – halfer
    Jun 4 '17 at 20:35

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