9

If you have the binary number 10110 how can I get it to return 11111? e.g a new binary number that sets all bits to 1 after the first 1, there are some likewise examples listed below:

101 should return 111 (3 bit length) 011 should return 11 (2 bit length) 11100 should be return 11111 (5 bit length) 101010101 should return 111111111 (9 bit length)

How can this be obtained the easiest way in Java? I could come up with some methods but they are not very "pretty".

7

You could use this code:

int setBits (int value)
{
    value |= (value >> 1);
    value |= (value >> 2);
    value |= (value >> 4);
    value |= (value >> 8);
    value |= (value >> 16);
    return value;
}

The idea is that leftmost 1 will get copied to all positions on the right.

EDIT: Also works fine with a negative value. If you replace int with long, add one extra |= statement: value |= (value >> 32). In general, last shift must be a power of 2 that is at least half of value size in bits.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    What's especially nice with that algorithm is that it reuses the prior operations. Naively i would just have done 32 shifts. – Johannes Schaub - litb May 23 '10 at 13:52
  • 1
    If you look at the implementation for Integer#highestOneBit() in the JDK, you'll see the same algorithm, though the last step is tailored deliver only single one bit, requiring the undoing captured in hleinone's answer. – seh May 23 '10 at 14:17
12

My try: Integer.highestOneBit(b) * 2 - 1

| improve this answer | |
  • For completeness: java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/… – Eric May 23 '10 at 14:04
  • Hmmm.. Looks like I can't post the link. SO doesn't like brackets. – Eric May 23 '10 at 14:05
  • 3
    Wow, had no idea Java had this function... this is definitely most eleagant here. – Amadan May 23 '10 at 15:17
6

Haven't tested, but something like this should be okay:

long setBits(long number) {
  long n = 1;
  while (n <= number) n <<= 1;
  return n - 1;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This won't work if number is negative. It will be fast if number is usually small, but slow if number is about uniformly distributed on its range. – doublep May 23 '10 at 13:54
  • True about negatives, I didn't think about that. And it would be faster on the average if I started from the other end. But 63 iterations (max) aren't really that slow; and the answer was off the top of my head. Obviously, hleinone's solution blows it out of the water... :) – Amadan May 23 '10 at 15:43
0

Not most efficient, but simplest,

    int i = (1 << (int)(Math.log(n)/Math.log(2)+1)) - 1;

It will work for first 31 bit of int and first 63 bit for long.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.