Consider two entities Parent and Child.

  • Child is part of Parent's transient collection
  • Child has a ManyToOne mapping to parent with FetchType.LAZY

Both are displayed on the same form to a user. When user saves the data we first update Parent instance and then Child collection (both using merge).

Now comes the tricky part. When user modifies only Child property on the form then hibernate dirty checking does not update Parent instance and thus does not increase optimistic locking version number for that entity.

I would like to see situation where only Parent is versioned and every time I call merge for Parent then version is always updated even if actual update is not executed in db.

  • You might like to answer your own question in this case. Some one might come and up-vote you on that. Or even better, that might help someone who is looking for the similar thing. – Adeel Ansari May 24 '10 at 8:18

I think I figured it out. After merge is called an attached instance reference is returned. When I obtain an explicit lock for that using entityManager.lock(updated, LockModeType.WRITE); then version number is increased even if Parent instance was not updated in db.

In addition I am comparing detached instance version with persisted instance version. If they don't match then Parent was updated in db and also version number has changed. This keeps version numbers consistent. Otherwise entityManager.lock would increase version number even if merge operation changed it.

Still looking for solution how to make hibernate increase version when entity is not dirty during merge.

  • +1 for locking solution – oedo May 24 '10 at 9:10

You can propagate changes from child entities to parent entities. This requires you to propagate the OPTIMISTIC_FORCE_INCREMENT lock whenever the child entity is modified.

This article explains in great details the way you should be implementing such a use case.

In short, you need to have all your entities implementing a RootAware interface:

public interface RootAware<T> {
    T root();
}

@Entity(name = "Post") 
@Table(name = "post")
public class Post {

    @Id
    private Long id;

    private String title;

    @Version
    private int version;

    //Getters and setters omitted for brevity
}

@Entity(name = "PostComment")
@Table(name = "post_comment")
public class PostComment 
    implements RootAware<Post> {

    @Id
    private Long id;

    @ManyToOne(fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    private Post post;

    private String review;

    //Getters and setters omitted for brevity

    @Override
    public Post root() {
        return post;
    }
}

@Entity(name = "PostCommentDetails")
@Table(name = "post_comment_details")
public class PostCommentDetails 
    implements RootAware<Post> {

    @Id
    private Long id;

    @ManyToOne(fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    @MapsId
    private PostComment comment;

    private int votes;

    //Getters and setters omitted for brevity

    @Override
    public Post root() {
        return comment.getPost();
    }
}

Then, you need two event listeners:

public static class RootAwareInsertEventListener 
    implements PersistEventListener {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = 
        LoggerFactory.getLogger(RootAwareInsertEventListener.class);

    public static final RootAwareInsertEventListener INSTANCE = 
        new RootAwareInsertEventListener();

    @Override
    public void onPersist(PersistEvent event) throws HibernateException {
        final Object entity = event.getObject();

        if(entity instanceof RootAware) {
            RootAware rootAware = (RootAware) entity;
            Object root = rootAware.root();
            event.getSession().lock(root, LockMode.OPTIMISTIC_FORCE_INCREMENT);

            LOGGER.info("Incrementing {} entity version because a {} child entity has been inserted", root, entity);
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void onPersist(PersistEvent event, Map createdAlready) 
        throws HibernateException {
        onPersist(event);
    }
}

and

public static class RootAwareInsertEventListener 
    implements PersistEventListener {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = 
        LoggerFactory.getLogger(RootAwareInsertEventListener.class);

    public static final RootAwareInsertEventListener INSTANCE = 
        new RootAwareInsertEventListener();

    @Override
    public void onPersist(PersistEvent event) throws HibernateException {
        final Object entity = event.getObject();

        if(entity instanceof RootAware) {
            RootAware rootAware = (RootAware) entity;
            Object root = rootAware.root();
            event.getSession().lock(root, LockMode.OPTIMISTIC_FORCE_INCREMENT);

            LOGGER.info("Incrementing {} entity version because a {} child entity has been inserted", root, entity);
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void onPersist(PersistEvent event, Map createdAlready) 
        throws HibernateException {
        onPersist(event);
    }
}

which you can register as follows:

public class RootAwareEventListenerIntegrator
    implements org.hibernate.integrator.spi.Integrator {

    public static final RootAwareEventListenerIntegrator INSTANCE = 
        new RootAwareEventListenerIntegrator();

    @Override
    public void integrate(
            Metadata metadata,
            SessionFactoryImplementor sessionFactory,
            SessionFactoryServiceRegistry serviceRegistry) {

        final EventListenerRegistry eventListenerRegistry =
                serviceRegistry.getService( EventListenerRegistry.class );

        eventListenerRegistry.appendListeners(EventType.PERSIST, RootAwareInsertEventListener.INSTANCE);
        eventListenerRegistry.appendListeners(EventType.FLUSH_ENTITY, RootAwareUpdateAndDeleteEventListener.INSTANCE);
    }

    @Override
    public void disintegrate(
            SessionFactoryImplementor sessionFactory,
            SessionFactoryServiceRegistry serviceRegistry) {
        //Do nothing
    }
}

and then supply the RootAwareFlushEntityEventListenerIntegrator via a Hibernate configuration property:

configuration.put(
    "hibernate.integrator_provider", 
    (IntegratorProvider) () -> Collections.singletonList(
        RootAwareEventListenerIntegrator.INSTANCE
    )
);

Now, when you modify a PostCommentDetails entity:

PostCommentDetails postCommentDetails = entityManager.createQuery(
    "select pcd " +
    "from PostCommentDetails pcd " +
    "join fetch pcd.comment pc " +
    "join fetch pc.post p " +
    "where pcd.id = :id", PostCommentDetails.class)
.setParameter("id", 2L)
.getSingleResult();

postCommentDetails.setVotes(15);

The parent Post entity version is modified as well:

SELECT  pcd.comment_id AS comment_2_2_0_ ,
        pc.id AS id1_1_1_ ,
        p.id AS id1_0_2_ ,
        pcd.votes AS votes1_2_0_ ,
        pc.post_id AS post_id3_1_1_ ,
        pc.review AS review2_1_1_ ,
        p.title AS title2_0_2_ ,
        p.version AS version3_0_2_
FROM    post_comment_details pcd
INNER JOIN post_comment pc ON pcd.comment_id = pc.id
INNER JOIN post p ON pc.post_id = p.id
WHERE   pcd.comment_id = 2

UPDATE post_comment_details 
SET votes = 15 
WHERE comment_id = 2

UPDATE post 
SET version = 1 
where id = 1 AND version = 0
  • how to achieve that in spring configuration.put( "hibernate.integrator_provider", (IntegratorProvider) () -> Collections.singletonList( RootAwareEventListenerIntegrator.INSTANCE ) ); – saferJo Apr 25 at 9:43
  • The hibernate.integrator_provider property can also take a fully-qualified class name so you can provide that via Spring as well. Just encapsulate the logic (currently expressed as lambda) in a dedicated class. – Vlad Mihalcea Apr 25 at 13:03

i don't think you can force hibernate to increase a version number for a non-changed object, because it will just not do any db UPDATE query if nothing has changed (for obvious reasons).

you could do a nasty hack like adding a new field to the object and incrementing that manually, but personally that seems to be a waste of time and resources. i'd go with your explicit locking solution since that seems to give you what you want, without unnecessary hackery.

I just implemented something similar which is working like beast fast and nice. At the moment you are saving your 'child' just call do something like:

save(child);
T parent = child.getParentEntity();
entityManager.lock(parent, LockModeType.OPTIMISTIC_FORCE_INCREMENT);

You need access to the entity manager which can be obtained in spring like:

  @PersistenceContext
  private EntityManager entityManager;

Your parent entity should have @Version from javax.persistence.Version and NOT the spring one. (I assume that on the child save moment you will have all the verifications and things done so when you are saving the child the parent should get dirty for sure)

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.