How is Runtime polymorphism different from Static polymorphism ?

Can this be an example of Runtime polymorphism ?

public class X
{
    public void methodA() // Base class method
    {
        System.out.println ("hello, I'm methodA of class X");
    }
}

public class Y extends X
{
    public void methodA() // Derived Class method
    {
        System.out.println ("hello, I'm methodA of class Y");
    }
}
public class Z
{
   public static void main (String args []) {
       X obj1 = new X(); // Reference and object X
       X obj2 = new Y(); // X reference but Y object
       obj1.methodA();
       obj2.methodA();
   }
}

The code has been picked from here

  • Yes this is an example of Runtime Polymorphism...and Difference is here – Neeraj Jain Mar 10 '15 at 11:00
  • You can see another full Java example in the following answer. – Edwin Dalorzo Mar 10 '15 at 12:32
  • 3
    Y obj1 = new X(); This is incorrect, you can not cast parent to child in case of Runtime polymophism. – Prince Gupta Jul 21 '16 at 10:14
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes this is Runtime polymorphism in Java

In static polymorphism, compiler itself determines which method should call. Method overloading is an example of static polymorphism.

In runtime polymorphism, compiler cannot determine the method at compile time. Method overriding(as your example) is an example of runtime polymorphism. Because in Runtime polymorphism (as your example), the signature of methodA() is similar in both the class X(base class) and Y(child class). So compiler cannot determine method at compile time which should execute. Only after object creation(which is a run time process), the runtime environment understand the exact method to call.

It is because of that in this case, obj1.methodA() calls methodA() in Class X since obj1 is reference variable of object created for class X

AND obj2.methodA() calls methodA() in Class Y since obj2 is reference variable of object created for class Y

For your better understanding i've tried modulating your code. Note the call for constructor for both the classes.

class X
{
    X(){
        System.out.println("X constructor called");
    }
    public void methodA() //Base class method
    {
        System.out.println ("hello, I'm methodA of class X");
    }
}

class Y extends X
{
    Y(){
         System.out.println("Y constructor called");
    }

    public void methodA() //Derived Class method
    {
        System.out.println ("hello, I'm methodA of class Y");
    }
}

public class Z
{
   public static void main (String args []) {
       X obj1 = new X(); // Reference and object X
       X obj2 = new Y(); // X reference but Y object
       obj1.methodA();
       obj2.methodA();
   }
}

output :-

X constructor called

X constructor called

Y constructor called

hello, I'm methodA of class X

hello, I'm methodA of class Y

Carefully, look where objects have been created. It seems reference of X is being created using y. Method for X's is expected to be called but constructor call of Y for X reference creation says indirectly that memory has been allocated to Y's Object before X's reference is created. Take a look at the consoles for clarification.

Its runtime polymorphism as the compiler won't know till the run time about which object method to be called.

however the following line will give you cast exception:

Y obj1 = new X(); //Incorrect way

X obj1 = new Y(); //Correct way

Now obj1.methodA() calls methodA() in Class Y since obj1 is reference variable of object created for class Y

Yes your example is an example of runtime polymorphism. An example of static polymorphism would be method overloading. Here are some good examples: What is the difference between dynamic and static polymorphism in Java?

Cheers,

Marcus

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.