2

I would like to provide a simple mechanism which casts an int to an enum type and also provides some error checking along the way. This would make sure, that the int doesn't fall out its declared enum range. I have come up with the following function, which utilizes a std::map:

#include <map>
#include <type_traits>

enum A
{
    a = 0,
    b,
    c
};

enum B
{
    d = 10,
    e,
    f
};

std::map<int, A> mA;
std::map<int, B> mB;

template<typename T> T ParseEnum(int nVal)
{
    std::map<int, T>* p;

    if (std::is_same<T, A>::value)
        p = &mA; //compiler error

    else if (std::is_same<T, B>::value)
        p = &mB; //compiler error

    return static_cast<T>(p->at(nVal));
}


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    mA.insert(std::pair<int, A>(0, A::a));
    mA.insert(std::pair<int, A>(1, A::b));
    mA.insert(std::pair<int, A>(2, A::c));

    mB.insert(std::pair<int, B>(10, B::d));
    mB.insert(std::pair<int, B>(11, B::e));
    mB.insert(std::pair<int, B>(12, B::f));

    try
    {
        A eA = ParseEnum<A>(1); //ok, should resolve to A::b;

        B eB = ParseEnum<B>(16); //should throw an exception;
    }
    catch (std::out_of_range&)
    {

    }

    return 0;
}

Unfortunately, I'm having trouble assigning the map references to the template based map pointer, as indicated by the following compiler errors:

error C2440: '=' : cannot convert from 'std::map<int,A,std::less<_Kty>,std::allocator<std::pair<const _Kty,_Ty>>> *' to 'std::map<int,B,std::less<_Kty>,std::allocator<std::pair<const _Kty,_Ty>>> *'

error C2440: '=' : cannot convert from 'std::map<int,B,std::less<_Kty>,std::allocator<std::pair<const _Kty,_Ty>>> *' to 'std::map<int,A,std::less<_Kty>,std::allocator<std::pair<const _Kty,_Ty>>> *'

Is there a way to define such a template based pointer or am I out of luck here?

1

Template specialization is a much better fit:

//declare the ParseEnum function template
template<typename T> 
T ParseEnum(int nVal);

//specialization for when ParseEnum is instantiated with A
template<>
A ParseEnum<A> (int nVal)
{
    return mA.at(nVal);
}

//specialization for B
template<>
B ParseEnum<B> (int nVal)
{
    return mB.at(nVal);
}

Or this might be more flexible. It creates a struct which will hold a reference to the map which corresponds to its template parameter:

//declare a struct which will hold a reference to the map we want
template <typename T>
struct GetMap
{
    static std::map<int,T> &map;
};

//when instantiated with A, the map member is a reference to mA
template<>
std::map<int,A> &GetMap<A>::map = mA;

//similarly for B and mB
template<>
std::map<int,B> &GetMap<B>::map = mB;

template<typename T> T ParseEnum(int nVal)
{
    //GetMap<T>::map will be a reference to the correct map
    return GetMap<T>::map.at(nVal);
}
  • This approach looks nice and also doesn't seem to create much overhead. I'll definitely have a closer look once I fully grasp the concept of template specialization. – Aurora Mar 11 '15 at 10:39
  • Are there any specific questions you have about it? I'm happy to help clarify. – TartanLlama Mar 11 '15 at 10:40
1

I would like provide a simple mechanism which casts an int to an enum type and also provides some error checking along the way. This would make sure, that the int doesn't fall out its declared enum range.

That sounds like a bad use of enums. Ideally, from a semantic point of view, an enum should just be a distinct type with a fixed set of values, and the fact that it's implemented as an int should be an implementation detail (much like a private member variable).

You might want to check out C++11 enum classes.

return static_cast<T>(p->at(nVal));

Where does the at come from? You'd need something like this to get std::out_of_range thrown:

std::map<int, T>::iterator find_iter = p->find(nVal);
if (find_iter == p->end())
{
    throw std::out_of_range("illegal value");
}
return static_cast<T>(find_iter->second);

(C++11 provides at for std::map)

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])

Should be int main(int argc, char* argv[]) in standard C++. Or just int main(), as you don't use the arguments anyway.

mA.insert(std::pair<int, A>(0, A::a));

You should use std::make_pair to let template type deduction figure out the argument types automatically, i.e.:

mA.insert(std::make_pair(0, A::a));

Now let's see what causes the compiler errors:

template<typename T> T ParseEnum(int nVal)
{
    std::map<int, T> * p;

    if (std::is_same<T, A>::value)
        p = &mA; //compiler error

    else if (std::is_same<T, B>::value)
        p = &mB; //compiler error

    return static_cast<T>(p->at(nVal));
}

In this function, T is either A or B. In the first case, it becomes:

// pseudo code:
A ParseEnumA(int nVal)
{
    std::map<int, A> * p;

    if (std::is_same<A, A>::value)
        p = &mA; // NOT a compiler error

    else if (std::is_same<A, B>::value)
        p = &mB; //compiler error

    return static_cast<A>(p->at(nVal));
}

In the second case:

// pseudo code:
B ParseEnumB(int nVal)
{
    std::map<int, B> * p;

    if (std::is_same<B, A>::value)
        p = &mA; // compiler error

    else if (std::is_same<B, B>::value)
        p = &mB; // NOT a compiler error

    return static_cast<B>(p->at(nVal));
}

See what happens? In either case, one of the assignments works and the other fails, because std::map<int, A> and std::map<int, B> are unrelated types.

Is there a way to define such a template based pointer or am I out of luck here?

For a very quick and dirty fix, you can get away with a reinterpret_cast. It will not be executed at run-time but get rid of the compile-time error.

if (std::is_same<T, A>::value)
    p = reinterpret_cast<std::map<int, T>*>(&mA);

else if (std::is_same<T, B>::value)
    p = reinterpret_cast<std::map<int, T>*>(&mB);

Here is the complete program:

#include <map>
#include <stdexcept>
#include <iostream>

enum A
{
    a = 0,
    b,
    c
};

enum B
{
    d = 10,
    e,
    f
};

std::map<int, A> mA;
std::map<int, B> mB;

template<typename T> T ParseEnum(int nVal)
{
    std::map<int, T>* p;

    if (std::is_same<T, A>::value)
        p = reinterpret_cast<std::map<int, T>*>(&mA);

    else if (std::is_same<T, B>::value)
        p = reinterpret_cast<std::map<int, T>*>(&mB);

    std::map<int, T>::iterator find_iter = p->find(nVal);
    if (find_iter == p->end())
    {
        throw std::out_of_range("illegal value");
    }
    return static_cast<T>(find_iter->second);
}


int main()
{
    mA.insert(std::make_pair(0, A::a));
    mA.insert(std::make_pair(1, A::b));
    mA.insert(std::make_pair(2, A::c));

    mB.insert(std::make_pair(10, B::d));
    mB.insert(std::make_pair(11, B::e));
    mB.insert(std::make_pair(12, B::f));

    try
    {
        A eA = ParseEnum<A>(1); //ok, should resolve to A::b;
        std::cout << "OK\n";
        B eB = ParseEnum<B>(16); //should throw an exception;
    }
    catch (std::out_of_range const& exc)
    {
        std::cerr << exc.what() << "\n";
    }
}

But the question is: Is this a good solution?

I don't think so. You should use C++11 enum classes and remove the necessity of converting an int to an enum! Consider the int an implementation detail, like a private member variable.

0

One way to get around the problem:

template <typename T> struct MapPtr;

template <> struct MapPtr<A> 
{
   static constexpr std::map<int, A>* const value =  &mA;
};

template <> struct MapPtr<B> 
{
   static constexpr std::map<int, B>* const value =  &mB;
};

template<typename T> T ParseEnum(int nVal)
{
    std::map<int, T>* ptr = MapPtr<T>::value;
    return static_cast<T>(ptr->at(nVal));
}
0

Here's a different strategy for dealing with the maps corresponding to A and B. Use a class template to provide access to the maps instead of having them as global data.

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <map>
#include <stdexcept>

enum A
{
    a = 0,
    b,
    c
};

enum B
{
    d = 10,
    e,
    f
};

template <typename T> struct MapContainer 
{
   static std::map<int, T>& getMap()
   {
      static std::map<int, T> theMap;
      return theMap;
   }
};

template<typename T> T ParseEnum(int nVal)
{
    std::map<int, T>& theMap = MapContainer<T>::getMap();
    return static_cast<T>(theMap.at(nVal));
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    std::map<int, A>& mA = MapContainer<A>::getMap();
    mA.insert(std::pair<int, A>(0, A::a));
    mA.insert(std::pair<int, A>(1, A::b));
    mA.insert(std::pair<int, A>(2, A::c));

    std::map<int, B>& mB = MapContainer<B>::getMap();
    mB.insert(std::pair<int, B>(10, B::d));
    mB.insert(std::pair<int, B>(11, B::e));
    mB.insert(std::pair<int, B>(12, B::f));

    try
    {
        A eA = ParseEnum<A>(1); //ok, should resolve to A::b;
        std::cout << "ParseEnum<A>(1): " << eA << std::endl;

        B eB = ParseEnum<B>(16); //should throw an exception;
        std::cout << "ParseEnum<B>(16): " << eB << std::endl;
    }
    catch (std::out_of_range&)
    {

    }

    return 0;
}

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