86

In my django application, I'm trying to write a unit test that performs an action and then checks the messages in the response.

As far as I can tell, there is no nice way of doing this.

I'm using the CookieStorage storage method, and I'd like to do something similar to the following:

    response = self.client.post('/do-something/', follow=True)
    self.assertEquals(response.context['messages'][0], "fail.")

The problem is, all I get back is a

print response.context['messages']
<django.contrib.messages.storage.cookie.CookieStorage object at 0x3c55250>

How can I turn this into something useful, or am I doing it all wrong?

Thanks, Daniel

5
  • this works, but... seriously? response.context['messages']._get()[0][0].__dict__['message']
    – dvydra
    May 24 '10 at 14:16
  • 5
    You can try to encapsulate this not so beautiful code in beautiful function assert_has_message(response, msg_text) and use it everywhere you would like after that. If you'll find better way to access the messages, you'll just modify the function in one place.
    – nkrkv
    May 24 '10 at 18:59
  • @nailxx, yeah, that's basically what I've done, but it's making me feel unwell :)
    – dvydra
    May 24 '10 at 23:11
  • 3
    This also works: messages_list = CookieStorage(response)._decode(response.cookies['messages'].value) This gives you a list of django.contrib.messages.storage.base.Message objects.
    – dvydra
    May 25 '10 at 9:58
  • @dvydra if you're still around, you may want to change the accepted answer
    – OrangeDog
    May 4 '18 at 15:07
110

I found a really easy approach:

response = self.client.post('/foo/')
messages = list(response.context['messages'])
self.assertEqual(len(messages), 1)
self.assertEqual(str(messages[0]), 'my message')

If you need to check for messages on a response that has no context you can use the following:

from django.contrib.messages import get_messages
messages = list(get_messages(response.wsgi_request))
self.assertEqual(len(messages), 1)
self.assertEqual(str(messages[0]), 'my message')

The fallback storage doesn't support indexing, however it is an iterable.

8
  • 2
    I also found that self.assertEqual(m[0].message, 'my message') works Aug 22 '14 at 14:12
  • 6
    if you need to check for messages on a response that has no context (such as a redirect), you can use list(r.wsgi_request._messages) Jan 19 '17 at 11:10
  • 6
    It looks like [0] does not work on the new versions : *** TypeError: 'FallbackStorage' object does not support indexing. However, it is an Iterable and you can use any for m in messages construct. Mar 19 '17 at 11:06
  • 2
    @Jonathan by using dir() in inside an interactive debugger (import ipdb; ipdb.set_trace()) inside a test case. Jul 25 '17 at 17:23
  • 1
24

From django documentation:

Outside of templates, you can use get_messages()

So, you could write something like:

from django.contrib.messages import get_messages

[...]

messages = [m.message for m in get_messages(response.wsgi_request)]
self.assertIn('My message', messages)

0
17

This works for me (displays all messages):

print [m.message for m in list(response.context['messages'])]

Also here are a couple of utility methods I have in a test class inherited from Django's TestCase. If you'd prefer to have them as functions, remove the self arguments and replace self.fail()'s with a raise.

def assert_message_count(self, response, expect_num):
    """
    Asserts that exactly the given number of messages have been sent.
    """

    actual_num = len(response.context['messages'])
    if actual_num != expect_num:
        self.fail('Message count was %d, expected %d' %
            (actual_num, expect_num))

def assert_message_contains(self, response, text, level=None):
    """
    Asserts that there is exactly one message containing the given text.
    """

    messages = response.context['messages']

    matches = [m for m in messages if text in m.message]

    if len(matches) == 1:
        msg = matches[0]
        if level is not None and msg.level != level:
            self.fail('There was one matching message but with different'
                'level: %s != %s' % (msg.level, level))

        return

    elif len(matches) == 0:
        messages_str = ", ".join('"%s"' % m for m in messages)
        self.fail('No message contained text "%s", messages were: %s' %
            (text, messages_str))
    else:
        self.fail('Multiple messages contained text "%s": %s' %
            (text, ", ".join(('"%s"' % m) for m in matches)))

def assert_message_not_contains(self, response, text):
    """ Assert that no message contains the given text. """

    messages = response.context['messages']

    matches = [m for m in messages if text in m.message]

    if len(matches) > 0:
        self.fail('Message(s) contained text "%s": %s' %
            (text, ", ".join(('"%s"' % m) for m in matches)))
1
  • 2
    Only works with explicit ResponseContext or TemplateResponse (which tries to construct a ResponseContext).
    – pkoch
    Oct 24 '11 at 20:24
3

Update

My original answer was written when django was still 1.1 or so. This answer is no longer relevant. See @daveoncode's answer for a better solution.

Original Answer

I did an experiment to test this. I changed the MESSAGE_STORAGE setting in one of my projects to 'django.contrib.messages.storage.cookie.CookieStorage' and executed a test that I had written to check for messages. It worked.

The key difference from what you were doing is the way I retrieved messages. See below:

def test_message_sending(self):
    data = dict(...)
    response = self.client.post(reverse('my_view'), data)
    messages = self.user.get_and_delete_messages()

    self.assertTrue(messages)
    self.assertEqual('Hey there!', messages[0])

This may be worth a try.

1
  • 27
    user.get_and_delete_messages() was deprecated in Django 1.2
    – Dave
    Nov 17 '11 at 0:14
0

Simpler version of the stalemate one:

class TestCaseMessagesMixture(object):
    def assertMessageCount(self, response, expect_num):
        """
        Asserts that exactly the given number of messages have been sent.
        """

        actual_num = len(response.context['messages'])
        if actual_num != expect_num:
            self.fail('Message count was %d, expected %d' %
                    (actual_num, expect_num)
                )

    def assertMessageEqual(self, response, text):
        """
        Asserts that the response includes the message text.
        """

        messages = [m.message for m in response.context['messages']]

        if text not in messages:
            self.fail(
                'No message with text "%s", messages were: %s' % 
                    (text, messages)
                )

    def assertMessageNotEqual(self, response, text):
        """
        Asserts that the response does not include the message text.
        """

        messages = [m.message for m in response.context['messages']]

        if text in messages:
            self.fail(
                'Message with text "%s" found, messages were: %s' % 
                    (text, messages)
                )
1
  • This is not exactly the same, as my version checks that the given text is contained in (not equal to) any/none of the messages. I prefer it that way, so that I only have to enter the key part of the message in a testcase and allow the message text to be updated without breaking the test.
    – anttikoo
    Jun 11 '12 at 12:00
0

Test helpers for validation of response messages count and content

def get_response_messages(self, response):
    from django.contrib.messages import get_messages
    return list(get_messages(response.wsgi_request))


def check_response_messages(self, response, message_index=None, message_value=None, exp_count=None):
    messages = self.get_response_messages(response)
    if exp_count is not None:
        self.assertEqual(len(messages), exp_count)

    if message_index is not None:
        message = messages[message_index]
        self.assertIn(message_value, str(message))

Can be used like this

message_value = "You can not switch to another type of account"
self.check_response_messages(response, exp_count=1, message_index=0, message_value=message_value)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.