34

I have tried to include the header file bits/stdc++ in my C++ code, but it seems the compiler doesn't support it. Is there any way to make it work?

I use OS X Yosemite 10.10.2 and Xcode 6.1.1.

9
  • 6
    You aren't supposed to include this header directly. Why do you think you need it? Mar 11 '15 at 18:06
  • 1
    @Omar Except you´ll probably get notably increased compile time. Use the standard headers necessary for your used functions/classes, and not some internal G++ file
    – deviantfan
    Mar 11 '15 at 18:13
  • 1
    @Omar "I used to include it instead of ..." That's wrong. The headers appearing in the bits directory are meant to bind the c++ compiler implementation with your actual machine and OS environment. These are usually included by the higher level implementations of the c++ standard library headers, sometimes only under certain conditions (#ifdef's) Mar 11 '15 at 18:13
  • 1
    Recommended reading: Why should I not #include <bits/stdc++.h>? Jun 15 '19 at 13:35
  • 1
    tl;dr your requirement/need is wrong and this is why. No. Jun 15 '19 at 13:36

12 Answers 12

36

You can do it by copying stdc++.h file from here: https://gist.github.com/reza-ryte-club/97c39f35dab0c45a5d924dd9e50c445f

Then you can include the file in your c++ file like this:

 //suppose the file is in your home folder, here my username is reza
 #include "/Users/reza/stdc++.h"
1
  • This is a bad advice, hash including the full path is an atrocious act Jun 16 at 10:02
24

Since, bits/stdc++ is a GNU GCC extension, whereas OSX uses the clang compiler.

You have to create bits directory inside /usr/local/include and then make a header file stdc++.h inside bits and paste the contents of this gist inside it. Then, it should compile as expected.


Since, /usr directory is hidden by default on Mac OSX.

  1. Open Finder.
  2. Click Go on menu bar then click Go to folder or Press Command+Shift+G directly.
  3. Enter the path /usr/local/include
  4. Now proceed as mentioned above.

(UPDATE: For latest OS X you need to make folder include inside local and make bits folder inside include folder and then copy paste the code inside bits folder.)

1
  • 2
    with the above path , not working for me. But with this path it is working "/Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Platforms/MacOSX.platform/Developer/SDKs/MacOSX10.14.sdk/usr/include/"
    – GvSharma
    Jul 22 '19 at 12:46
23

Mac OS X 10.9+ no longer uses GCC/libstdc++ but uses libc++ and Clang.

After the XCode 6.0.1 update the headers are now located here:

/Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Toolchains/XcodeDefault.xctoolchain/usr/include/c++/v1

so, get the stdc++.h file from here,then creat bits directory in the above long address, and copy the file stdc++.h to the bits directory.

1
  • 1
    At the very least, don't call it "bits/stdc++.h". That's the name of an implementation header in libstdc++. Call it "myHeaderWithAllOfTheStdlib" or something Jun 15 '19 at 13:38
10

You can't. X-Code uses LLVM Toolchain with Clang for the compiler, while <bits/stdc++> is specific to the GNU Compiler Toolchain.

Second, you shouldn't be using that header in the first place, as stated by everyone else.

1
  • 3
    But by creating a folder in "/Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Platforms/MacOSX.platform/Developer/SDKs/MacOSX10.14.sdk/usr/include/" named bits, i can add the stdc++.h and it worked Jun 9 '19 at 11:47
9

Before Adding the bits/stdc++.h to your mac os platform, the First things are to figure out where your include files are present. To figure out which include file is getting utilized within you mac environment.

  • Run this command in terminal:

    echo "" | gcc -xc - -v -E

This will provide the details of gcc environment in your platform

Apple LLVM version 10.0.1 (clang-1001.0.46.4)
Target: x86_64-apple-darwin18.7.0
Thread model: posix
InstalledDir: /Library/Developer/CommandLineTools/usr/bin
"/Library/Developer/......."
ignoring nonexistent directory 
"/Library/Developer/CommandLineTools/SDKs/MacOSX10.14.sdk/usr/local/include"
ignoring nonexistent directory 
"/Library/Developer/CommandLineTools/SDKs/MacOSX10.14.sdk/Library/Frameworks"
#include "..." search starts here:
#include <...> search starts here:
 /usr/local/include
 /Library/Developer/CommandLineTools/usr/lib/clang/10.0.1/include
 /Library/Developer/CommandLineTools/usr/include
 /Library/Developer/CommandLineTools/SDKs/MacOSX10.14.sdk/usr/include


/Library/Developer/CommandLineTools/SDKs/MacOSX10.14.sdk/System/Library/Frameworks (framework directory)
End of search list.
# 1 "<stdin>"
# 1 "<built-in>" 1
# 1 "<built-in>" 3
# 361 "<built-in>" 3
# 1 "<command line>" 1
# 1 "<built-in>" 2
# 1 "<stdin>" 2
  • Go to the include path. ex: /usr/local/include Create a bits folder and add stdc++.h file.
1
  • 1
    Thank you. This clearly helped. It's much needed for competitive programming to just import <bits/stdc++.h> Jun 19 at 18:34
1

1.Download the stdc++.h file from https://gist.github.com/eduarc/6....

2.In Finder CTRL + SHIFT +G and open /Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Platforms/MacOSX.platform/Developer/SDKs/MacOSX10.14.sdk/usr/include/

3.Create the folder bits and copy the downloaded file here.

1
1
  1. Open Finder.
  2. Click Go on menu bar then click Go to folder or Press Command+Shift+G directly.
  3. Enter the path or c/p this path directly

/Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Toolchains/XcodeDefault.xctoolchain/usr/include/c++/v1

  1. Then create bits directory in the above long address.
  2. Now, get the stdc++.h file from [here][1].
  3. and copy the file stdc++.h to the bits directory.
1

The standard GNU compiler, G++ Does not directly support this header so we include it in the required location using the following steps :

  1. cd /usr/local/include

  2. mkdir bits

  3. nano stdc++.h

then copy the code of the header file from here .

Hope that helps ! :D

1

Simply create a header file like bitsStdcpp.hpp file in your file directory, add the following code in that file and use #include "bitsStdcpp.hpp" instead of #include <bits/stdc++.h>

#include <stdio.h>

using namespace std;


#ifndef _GLIBCXX_NO_ASSERT
  #include <cassert>
  #endif
  #include <cctype>
  #include <cerrno>
  #include <cfloat>
  #include <ciso646>
  #include <climits>
  #include <clocale>
  #include <cmath>
  #include <csetjmp>
  #include <csignal>
  #include <cstdarg>
  #include <cstddef>
  #include <cstdio>
  #include <cstdlib>
  #include <cstring>
  #include <ctime>

  #if __cplusplus >= 201103L
  #include <ccomplex>
  #include <cfenv>
  #include <cinttypes>
  #include <cstdbool>
  #include <cstdint>
  #include <ctgmath>
  #include <cwchar>
  #include <cwctype>
  #endif

  // C++
  #include <algorithm>
  #include <bitset>
  #include <complex>
  #include <deque>
  #include <exception>
  #include <fstream>
  #include <functional>
  #include <iomanip>
  #include <ios>
  #include <iosfwd>
  #include <iostream>
  #include <istream>
  #include <iterator>
  #include <limits>
  #include <list>
  #include <locale>
  #include <map>
  #include <memory>
  #include <new>
  #include <numeric>
  #include <ostream>
  #include <queue>
  #include <set>
  #include <sstream>
  #include <stack>
  #include <stdexcept>
  #include <streambuf>
  #include <string>
  #include <typeinfo>
  #include <utility>
  #include <valarray>
  #include <vector>

  #if __cplusplus >= 201103L
  #include <array>
  #include <atomic>
  #include <chrono>
  #include <condition_variable>
  #include <forward_list>
  #include <future>
  #include <initializer_list>
  #include <mutex>
  #include <random>
  #include <ratio>
  #include <regex>
  #include <scoped_allocator>
  #include <system_error>
  #include <thread>
  #include <tuple>
  #include <typeindex>
  #include <type_traits>
  #include <unordered_map>
  #include <unordered_set>
  

#endif /* bitsStdcpp_hpp */
0
  1. Open Finder.
  2. Click Go on menu bar then click Go to folder or Press Command+Shift+G directly.
  3. Enter the path /Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Toolchains/XcodeDefault.xctoolchain/usr/include/c++/v1

Now, get the stdc++.h file from here, then create bits directory in the above long address, and copy the file stdc++.h to the bits directory.

1
  • No, this is monumentally silly. That's a header from Linux GCC 4.8, not Mac Clang <whatever your version is>. Do not do this I cannot stress it enough. Jun 15 '19 at 13:37
0
  1. Copy the content of this header file to clipboard from Link: https://gist.github.com/reza-ryte-club/97c39f35dab0c45a5d924dd9e50c445f

  2. Run following in terminal :

    • mkdir /usr/local/include/bits
    • vim /usr/local/include/bits/stdc++.h
    • Switch to insert mode (press i) and Paste clipboard content
    • Save/Exit (Esc + : + w + q + Enter)
  3. Try compliation of your source code

0

The reason for that as stated by others also is because Mac OS X 10.9+ no longer uses GCC/libstdc++ but uses libc++ and Clang.

So one alternative way to fix that is to make your default mac compiler from clang to gcc.

As you can see in this image, the default mac compiler is clang.

So, what we can do here is install gcc!

Step 1

Run the following command to install gcc (assuming homebrew is installed on your machine):

$ brew install gcc

Step 2

After gcc is installed note the version by running the following command

$ gcc --version

Step 3

So now when we run g++-version it will use the gcc compiler, but we want it to use gcc compiler when we run g++. For that we are going to create a symbolic link of g++ to gcc:

$ cd /usr/local/bin

Now create a symbolic link by running this command:

$ ln -s g++-[version] g++

(Replace version by your current installed.)

Now restart the terminal for the changes to take effect and run g++ , it will use gcc compiler. It should look like this.

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