26
namespace someNameSpace {
    extern "C" void doSomething()
        {
             someOperations();
        }
}

I want to run doSomething() in both C++ and C environment.

Is someNameSpace still encapsulating doSomething() if I expose it to extern "C" linkage?

Is there a good way to share functions between C++ and C while avoiding polluting global namespace on C++ side?

Edit: Because this code is primarily used in C++ mode, while the C linkage is for test use only, I guess this is a better way to do it.

namespace someNameSpace {
    #ifdef COMPILE_FOR_C_LINKAGE
    extern "C"
    #else
    extern "C++"
    #endif
    { 
        void doSomething()
            {
                 someOperations();
            }
    }
}
  • Did you try to use it in a C program? If so, what happened? – Ryan J Mar 11 '15 at 20:46
  • @RyanJ Yes, I tried, it compiles and links well in both C++ and C. I haven't run it yet. – user3528438 Mar 11 '15 at 20:54
25

Your code works, but you should beware that all functions that have extern "C" linkage share the same space of names, but that is not to be confused with the C++ notion of "namespace": Your function is really someNameSpace::doSomething, but you cannot have any other extern "C" function with unqualified name doSomething in any other namespace.

See 7.5/6:

At most one function with a particular name can have C language linkage. Two declarations for a function with C language linkage with the same function name (ignoring the namespace names that qualify it) that appear in different namespace scopes refer to the same function. Two declarations for a variable with C language linkage with the same name (ignoring the namespace names that qualify it) that appear in different namespace scopes refer to the same variable. An entity with C language linkage shall not be declared with the same name as a variable in global scope, unless both declarations denote the same entity; no diagnostic is required if the declarations appear in different translation units. A variable with C language linkage shall not be declared with the same name as a function with C language linkage (ignoring the namespace names that qualify the respective names); no diagnostic is required if the declarations appear in different translation units. [Note: Only one definition for an entity with a given name with C language linkage may appear in the program (see 3.2); this implies that such an entity must not be defined in more than one namespace scope. — end note]

Your company's or project's global style arbiters should be able to advise you on a suitable naming policy for your code base.

| improve this answer | |
  • An entity with C language linkage shall not be declared with the same name as a variable in global scope, unless both declarations denote the same entity; ---- Is this a "entity vs variable" statement? I experimented with g++ 4.3.3 and it seems true. Conflict occurs only when I re-declare an global variable like "extern int doSomething=1;" but it's OK if I define another "extern void doSomething(){}" as long as it's not another extern C linkage. – user3528438 Mar 11 '15 at 21:09
  • 3
    Your final statement in the first paragraph is wrong -- you CAN have another doSomething defined in some other namespace, as long as it is not extern "C". – Chris Dodd Mar 12 '15 at 0:18
  • @ChrisDodd: Ah yes, that's what I meant. Edited. Thanks! – Kerrek SB Mar 12 '15 at 8:41
11

Just piece of code to illustrate behavior stated in Kerrek SB answer

#include <iostream>

namespace C{
    void Hello(){
        std::cout<<"Hello"<<std::endl;
    }
    extern "C" void HelloThere(){
        std::cout<<"Hello There from extern \"C\""<<std::endl;
    }
}

extern "C" void HelloThere();

int main() {
    C::Hello();
    C::HelloThere(); //Compiles
    //Hello(); <--- does not compile
    HelloThere(); //Also compiles and prints the same as C::HelloThere() !!!

    return 0;
}

Live at http://ideone.com/X26wfR

| improve this answer | |
0

In C++ ABI, namespaces have to be mangled. So this:

namespace foo
{
    void bar(int){}
}

is translated more or less to such symbol:

foo::bar(int)

When you force the compiler to use C ABI, the similar symbol

namespace foo
{
    extern "C" void bazz(int){}
}

after compilation looks like following:

bazz

You can see the difference in the godbolt: https://godbolt.org/z/BmVpSQ

In C ABI there are no namespaces or argument list mangled with the function, so you can only have 1 such symbol in the whole code. Defining it twice:

namespace foo
{
    extern "C" void bazz(int){}
}

namespace foo2
{
    extern "C" void bazz(int){}
}

int main()
{
    foo2::bazz(5);
    return 0;
}

...is illegal. Surprisingly to me, gcc doesn't emmit compilation/linking error but runtime error For some reason, gcc compiler emits very strange error:

https://wandbox.org/permlink/BiN0auna9klBg5GE

The clang compiler emits just emits simple compilation error in such case:

https://wandbox.org/permlink/r5CUXm7OKePtG35L

| improve this answer | |
  • Not sure if it was different at the time this answer was posted, but gcc seems to be emitting an error during compilation when I clicked the link (interestingly, at the assembly stage, which is I think the first time I've ever seen an error in that stage of compilation) – Dominick Pastore Aug 10 at 16:30
  • @DominickPastore you are right - edited the error message is very strange though. I've edited the answer. – jaskmar Aug 11 at 10:08

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