3

As an exercise, in input I got 2 very big string containing long binary representation here a short one but could have more than 100 bits:

Example

11100
00011

With output in bitwise OR (as string)

11111

My approach was to parse each string characters and make a bitwise OR and build a new string but it is too long to process on big entry and not effective.

Then ParseInt method is restricted to a 64 bit length

num1, err:= strconv.ParseInt("11100", 2, 64)
num2, err:= strconv.ParseInt("00011", 2, 64)
res := num1 | num2

How to deal with a bitwise OR between 2 string binary representation?

7

You could create the resulting bitwise OR string by doing character comparisons, or you can perform arbitrary large numeric operations using math/big. Here is an example of such an operation:

package main

import "fmt"
import "math/big"

func main() {
    num1 := "11100"
    num2 := "00011"

    var bigNum1 big.Int
    var bigNum2 big.Int
    var result big.Int

    if _, ok := bigNum1.SetString(num1, 2); !ok {
        panic("invalid num1")
    }
    if _, ok := bigNum2.SetString(num2, 2); !ok {
        panic("invalid num2")
    }
    result.Or(&bigNum1, &bigNum2)

    for i := result.BitLen() - 1; i >= 0; i-- {
        fmt.Print(result.Bit(i))
    }
    fmt.Println()
}

Go Playground

  • thanks, it is perfect I had looked to math/big but not enough to see this convert methods, Go documentation is not well displayed to my opinon, to much scroll – darul75 Mar 12 '15 at 9:17
0

While you could convert these to numbers to perform bitwise operations, if your only goal is to perform a single bitwise OR on the two strings, parsing the strings into numbers will be less efficient than simply iterating over the string to achieve your end result. Doing so would only make sense if you were performing lots of operations on the numbers in their binary form.

Example code for performing an OR operation on the strings below. Do note that this code assumes the strings are the same length as the examples in the question are, if they were of different lengths you would need to handle that as well.

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    n1 := "1100"
    n2 := "0011"

    fmt.Printf("Input: %v | %v\n", n1, n2)

    if len(n1) != len(n2) {
        fmt.Println("Only supports strings of the same length")
        return
    }

    result := make([]byte, len(n1))

    for i := 0; i < len(n1); i++ {
        switch n1[i] {
        case '0':
            switch n2[i] {
            case '0':
                result[i] = '0'
            case '1':
                result[i] = '1'
            }
        case '1':
            switch n2[i] {
            case '0':
                result[i] = '1'
            case '1':
                result[i] = '1'
            }
        }
    }

    fmt.Println("Result: ", string(result))
}

http://play.golang.org/p/L3o6_jYdi1

  • 2
    You would need to pad them out if their lengths weren't identical. – Simon Whitehead Mar 11 '15 at 21:47
0

How about this:

package main

import "fmt"

func main(){
    a :=   "01111100"
    b := "1001000110"

    var longest, len_diff int 

    if len(a) > len(b) {
        longest = len(a)
        len_diff = len(a) - len(b)
    } else {
        longest = len(b)
        len_diff = len(b) - len(a)
    }

    temp_slice := make([] byte, longest)

    var a_start, b_start int

    if len(a) > len(b) {
        for i := 0; i < len_diff; i++ {
            temp_slice[i] = a[i]
        }
        a_start = len_diff

    } else {
        for i := 0; i < len_diff; i++ {
            temp_slice[i] = b[i]
        }
        b_start = len_diff
    }

    for i := 0; i < (longest - len_diff); i++ {
        if a[a_start + i] == '1' ||  b[b_start + i] == '1' {
            temp_slice[len_diff + i] = '1'
        } else {
            temp_slice[len_diff + i] = '0'
        }
    }

    fmt.Println(string(temp_slice))
}

goplayground

  • 1
    Don't use 48 and 49 when '0' and '1' are more appropriate and readable. – Dave C Mar 12 '15 at 18:37
  • 1
    Instead of mucking about with strings.Repeat (and the associated allocations) it would be simpler just to copy the leading bytes as-is from the longest input before switching to doing bit ops. – Dave C Mar 12 '15 at 18:39
  • @DaveC, thanks for the suggestions. I think they are both good; I modified my code to reflect them. – Akavall Mar 13 '15 at 4:00
  • Sorry to belabor this, but copy(tmp[:lenDiff], a); a := a[lenDiff:] (or b) (idiomatic Go identifier names use mixedCaps rather than under_scores) would be better than a manual loop and having to remembering an offset to how much remains (i.e. by the last loop it would be nice if the a and b where now the same length with just the remaining bits and tmp could just be appended to to finish off). – Dave C Mar 13 '15 at 7:37
  • E.g. perhaps something more like play.golang.org/p/V5l73KxaI2 maybe (feel free to copy or improve on that). – Dave C Mar 13 '15 at 7:49

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