7

Is there a better way to build a move constructor for a union-like class? If I were to have a union-like class like the class in the following code, is there a way to build the class or the move constructor that wouldn't require switch statement like the move constructor in the following code.

class S {
    private:
        enum {CHAR, INT, DOUBLE} type; // tag
        // anonymous union
        union {
            char c;
            int n;
            double d;
        };

    public:
        // constructor if the union were to hold a character
        AS(const char c) {
            this->tag = AS::CHAR;
            this->c = c;
        }
        // constructor if the union were to hold a int
        AS(const int i) {
            this->tag = AS::INT;
            this->n = i;
        }
        // constructor if the union were to hold a double
        AS(const double d) {
            this->tag = AS::DOUBLE;
            this->d = d;
        }

        // Move constructor with switch statement
        S(S &&src) : type(std::move(src.type)) {
            switch(type) {
                case CHAR:
                    this->c = src.c);
                    src.c = 0;
                    break;
                case INT:
                    this->n = src.n;
                    src.n = 0;
                    break;
                case DOUBLE:
                    this->d = src.d;
                    src.d = 0
                    break;
                default:
                    break;
            }
        }
};
5
  • 1
    Depends on your compiler. gcc supports type punning via unions, so you could simply assign your largest element no matter what
    – Red Alert
    Mar 12, 2015 at 0:59
  • 14
    If your real class contains only basic data types or POD structures, I would not bother with defining custom move constructors at all, because it will just be a copy anyway. It's not necessary to set the source data types to 0 afterwards, because you shouldn't be reading from it again anyway.
    – Neil Kirk
    Mar 12, 2015 at 1:00
  • 1
    Exception: if one of the structures is huge but other members are tiny, there may be benefit to selectively copying/moving.
    – Neil Kirk
    Mar 12, 2015 at 1:16
  • 1
    @NeilKirk Wouldn't it be possible to have a pointer type in the union which is owned by this class? If so, then move semantics would avoid the need for a deep copy? Mar 12, 2015 at 1:20
  • @JamesAdkison Yes. I was assuming there was no pointer trickery. I didn't make that explicit though.
    – Neil Kirk
    Mar 12, 2015 at 1:28

3 Answers 3

6

No, there is no better way. If you want to safely move from a union containing arbitrary types, you must do so from the field of the union that has last been written to (if any). The other answer stating the contrary is wrong, consider an example like

union SomethingLikeThisIsGoingToHappenInPractice {
  std::string what_we_actually_want_to_move;
  char what_we_do_not_care_about[sizeof(std::string)+1];
};

If you use the move constructor of the 'largest' type here you'd have to pick the char array here, despite moving that actually not really doing anything. If the std::string field is set you'd hope to move its internal buffer, which is not going to happen if you look at the char array. Also keep in mind that move semantics is about semantics, not about moving memory. If that was the issue you could just always use memmove and be done with it, no C++11 required.

This isn't even going into the problem of reading from a union member you haven't written to being UB in C++, even for primitive types but especially for class types.

TL;DR if you find yourself in this situation use the solution originally proposed by the OP, not what's in the accepted answer.


PS: Of course if you are just moving a union that only contains things that are trivially moveable, like primitive types, you could just use the default move constructor for unions which does just copy the memory; In that case it's really not worth it to have a move constructor in the first place though, other than for consistencies sake.

0

Yes, there is better way. At first it have to add EMPTY tag, after this use delegating copy constructor:

class S {
    private:
        enum {EMPTY, CHAR, INT, DOUBLE} type; // tag
        // anonymous union
        union {
            char c;
            int n;
            double d;
        };

    public:
        S(){ this->type = EMPTY; }

        // constructor if the union were to hold a character
        S(const char c) {
            this->type = CHAR;
            this->c = c;
        }
        // constructor if the union were to hold a int
        S(const int i) {
            this->type = INT;
            this->n = i;
        }
        // constructor if the union were to hold a double
        S(const double d) {
            this->type = DOUBLE;
            this->d = d;
        }

        S(const S& src) = default;// default copy constructor

        // Move constructor 
        S(S&& src) 
          : S(src) // copy here
        {
          src.type = EMPTY; // mark src as empty
        }
};

Of course, this example is not very useful, unlike the example below, which adds work with a pointer to a string:

#include <cassert>
#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <string>

class S {
    public:
        enum Tag {EMPTY, CHAR, INT, DOUBLE, STRING};
    private:
        Tag type; 
        // anonymous union
        union {
            char c;
            int n;
            double d;
            std::string* str;
        };

    public:
        S(){ this->type = EMPTY; }

        // constructor if the union were to hold a character
        S(const char c) {
            this->type = CHAR;
            this->c = c;
        }
        // constructor if the union were to hold a int
        S(const int i) {
            this->type = INT;
            this->n = i;
        }
        // constructor if the union were to hold a double
        S(const double d) {
            this->type = DOUBLE;
            this->d = d;
        }

        S(std::unique_ptr<std::string> ptr) {
            this->type = STRING;
            this->str = ptr.release();
        }

        std::unique_ptr<std::string> ExtractStr()
        {
           if ( this->type != STRING )
             return nullptr;

           std::string* ptr = this->str;
           this->str  = nullptr;
           this->type = EMPTY;
           return std::unique_ptr<std::string>{ptr};
        }

        Tag GetType() const
        {
          return type;
        }

    private:
        // only move is allowed for public
                     S(const S& src) = default;// default copy constructor
        S& operator = (const S& src) = default;// default copy assignment operator
    public:

        // Move constructor 
        S(S&& src) 
          : S(src) // copy here (but we copy only pointer for STRING)
        {
          src.type = EMPTY; // mark src as empty
        }

        S& operator = (S&& src)
        {
          if ( this->type == STRING )
             ExtractStr();// this call frees memory

          this->operator=(src);
          src.type = EMPTY;
          return *this;
        }

      ~S()
       {
          if ( this->type == STRING )
          {
             ExtractStr();// this call frees memory
          }
       }
};

// some test
int main()
{
  S sN(1);
  S sF(2.2);
  S x{std::move(sN)};

  std::unique_ptr<std::string> pStr1 = std::make_unique<std::string>("specially for Daniel Robertson");
  std::unique_ptr<std::string> pStr2 = std::make_unique<std::string>("example ");
  std::unique_ptr<std::string> pStr3 = std::make_unique<std::string>("~S() test");

  S xStr1(std::move(pStr1)); 
  S xStr2(std::move(pStr2)); 
  S xStr3(std::move(pStr3)); 
  x = std::move(xStr1);

  assert(xStr1.GetType() == S::EMPTY);
  assert(x.GetType() == S::STRING);

  std::string str2 = *xStr2.ExtractStr();
  std::cout << str2 << *x.ExtractStr() << std::endl; 
  return 0;
}
-1

Since unions as a data type refer to the same place in memory for all of the fields inside (although the ordering of smaller fields like the 4 bytes of char array[4] within that space depends on the system), it is possible to just move the union using the largest field. This will ensure that you move the entire union every time, regardless of which fields you are currently using the union for.

class S {
    private:
        enum {CHAR, INT, DOUBLE} type; // tag
        // anonymous union
        union {
            char c;
            int n;
            double d;
        };
    public:
        // Move constructor with switch statement
        S(S &&src) : type(std::move(src.type)) {
             this->d = src.d;
             src.d = 0;
        }
};
4
  • on a x86 and x86_64 with Windows and Linux int is 32 bits long, double is 64 bits long
    – felknight
    Mar 12, 2015 at 3:25
  • Right, I must have been thinking of floats - I'll update that in the answer, thanks for pointing that out!
    – CLL
    Mar 12, 2015 at 3:36
  • 1
    I'm worried about what if the move ctor of one of the types had custom behavior, such as a std::vector. We can't rely on move ctors to all act like memcpy, can we?
    – Bryan Edds
    Jan 5, 2016 at 23:39
  • 2
    I don't think this is actually standard. GCC (and probably Clang) support type-punning via a union in C++, but C++ doesn't specify it. So, fine answer if you add this detail, but otherwise I consider it incorrect.
    – davmac
    Oct 2, 2018 at 16:29

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