3

In Julia, I have a function like this:

function f(x::Float64, c::Float64)
    if x <= 0
        return(0.0)
    elseif x <= c
        return(x / c)
    else
        return(1.0)
    end
end

The function is type-stable and so will run quickly. However, I want to include the function in a package for general distribution, including to 32-bit machines. What is best practice here? Should I write another version of the function for Float32 (this could get annoying if I have many such functions)? Could I use FloatingPoint for the input types instead? If I do this, how do I ensure the function remains type-stable, since 0.0 and 1.0 are Float64, while x / c could potentially be Float32 or Float16? Maybe I could use type parameters, e.g. T<:FloatingPoint and then let x::T and c::T, and then use 0.0::T and 1.0::T in the body of the function to ensure it is type-stable?

Any guidance here would be appreciated.

  • 2
    32 bit machines do support Float64 fine. The 32/64 bit distinction applies only to integers. – Mr Alpha Mar 12 '15 at 12:12
  • @MrAlpha Thanks, that is useful information, – Colin T Bowers Mar 13 '15 at 8:47
11

The one and zero functions are useful here:

function f(x, c)
    if x <= 0
        return zero(x)
    elseif x <= c
        return x/c
    else
        return one(x)
    end
end

This version is a bit more strict about the input types:

function f{T<:FloatingPoint}(x::T, c::T)
    if x <= 0
        return zero(T)
    elseif x <= c
        return x/c
    else
        return one(T)
    end
end

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