7

I want to implement a private function based on a boolean template parameter. Something like that:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template <bool is_enabled = true>
class Aggregator {
public:
    void fun(int a) {
        funInternal(a);
    }

private:
    void funInternal(int a, typename std::enable_if<is_enabled>::type* = 0) {
        std::cout << "Feature is enabled!" << std::endl;
    }

    void funInternal(int a, typename std::enable_if<!is_enabled>::type* = 0) {
        std::cout << "Feature is disabled!" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
   Aggregator<true> a1;
   Aggregator<false> a2;

   a1.fun(5);
   a2.fun(5);

   return 0;
}

But the program above does not compile: error: no type named 'type' in 'struct std::enable_if' void funInternal(int a, typename std::enable_if::type* = 0).

Is it possible to realize the desired behavior with enable_if?

  • 2
    Without saying why, I can say this is probably the most minimal you can make the changes to your code: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/480dd15245cdbb6f – chris Mar 12 '15 at 4:10
  • Ah, so the trick is to create a method parameter from the class template parameter? – moo Mar 12 '15 at 4:13
  • 2
    I think it works for the same reason as this: youtube.com/watch?v=dTeKf5Oek2c&t=2244 – chris Mar 12 '15 at 4:18
  • @chris If I'm not mistaken, in the OP the overload is based on a value (i.e., a non-type template parameter) whereas that video is overloading for different types. Do you think it should still work regardless of this detail? – James Adkison Mar 12 '15 at 5:48
  • @JamesAdkison, It's a bit different, but the value becomes the first argument to std::enable_if. Applying the same logic, the user could call a1.fun<false>(5) and things would change, just like the normal usage of std::enable_if. – chris Mar 12 '15 at 5:55
9

The following is an adaptation of the solution (http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/480dd15245cdbb6f) provided by @chris in the comments, which seems to meet your needs.

#include <iostream>

template<bool is_enabled = true>
class Aggregator
{
public:
    void fun(int a)
    {
        funInternal(a);
    }

private:
    template<bool enabled = is_enabled>
    void funInternal(typename std::enable_if<enabled, int>::type a)
    {
        std::cout << "Feature is enabled!" << std::endl;
    }

    template<bool enabled = is_enabled>
    void funInternal(typename std::enable_if<!enabled, int>::type a)
    {
        std::cout << "Feature is disabled!" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Aggregator<true> a1;
    Aggregator<false> a2;

    a1.fun(5);
    a2.fun(5);

    return 0;
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.