In our project, we have an entity 'Restaurant' with nearly 30 fields(some have relationships with other entities). So, every time we need a 'Restaurant' object even for a few fields, all the others are retrieved. This effects the performance. So, in the HBM file, we wrote two classes both pointing to the same physical class and same database table, as shown below.

=== restaurant.hbm.xml ===
<!-- Light Weight Version -->
<class name="com.raj.model.Restaurant" table="RESTAURANTS" entity-name="RestaurantLite" 
                dynamic-update="false" dynamic-insert="false">
<cache usage="read-only"/>
     <!-- few basic properties and relationships -->
</class>

<!-- Restaurant -->
<class name="com.raj.model.Restaurant" table="RESTAURANTS" entity-name="Restaurant">
     <!-- all properties and relationships -->
</class>

In one of the DAO implementations, we are using Criteria which takes 'RestaurantLite' and returning list of restaurants as shown below.

Criteria criteria = session.createCriteria("RestaurantLite");

   // criteria related stuff

return new LinkedHashSet<Restaurant>(criteria.list());

Now we want to remove all hbm files and use annotations. So how the same can be done using annotations for entites? Do we need to create an extra class 'RestaurantLite'? If then, how the above criteria returns 'Restaurant' objects??

  • 1
    This effects the performance. To what degree? Have you measured? As the Hibernate docs note: optimizing row reads is much more important than optimization of column reads. However, only loading some properties of a class could be useful in extreme cases. For example, when legacy tables have hundreds of columns and the data model cannot be improved. docs.jboss.org/hibernate/orm/3.3/reference/en/html/… – Alan Hay Mar 12 '15 at 10:53
  • @Alan Hay We have a database with thousands of records for each table. The class mentioned above is needed for most of the operations. So, retrieving all properties for each restaurant every time definitely impacts performance. So, We came up with that solution in hbm files. – Raj44 Mar 12 '15 at 10:59
  • All database have thousands,/tens of thousands/millions of rows. As the Hibernate docs point out column optimizations are rarely worthwhile. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Program_optimization#When_to_optimize – Alan Hay Mar 12 '15 at 11:00
  • @AlanHay That's true. But we cannot change the legacy code. We have to use annotations and remove hbm files.. – Raj44 Mar 12 '15 at 11:03

This topic as well as how you can use it for lazy fetching attributes, it's described in great details in this article.

To summarize it, the following mappings are going to demonstrate how you can map multiple entities to the same database table:

@Entity(name = "Post")
public class Post {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy=GenerationType.AUTO)
    private Long id;

    private String name;

    private String description;

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getDescription() {
        return description;
    }

    public void setDescription(String description) {
        this.description = description;
    }
}

@Entity(name = "PostSummary")
@Table(name = "Post")
@Immutable
public class PostSummary {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)
    private Long id;

    private String name;

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

@Entity(name = "UpdatablePostSummary")
@Table(name = "Post")
@DynamicUpdate
public class UpdatablePostSummary {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)
    private Long id;

    private String name;

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

And Hibernate will work just fine:

@Test
public void testOneTableMultipleEntities() {
    doInTransaction(session -> {
        Post post = (Post) session.get(Post.class, 1L);
        PostSummary postSummary = (PostSummary) session.get(PostSummary.class, 1L);
        UpdatablePostSummary updatablePostSummary = (UpdatablePostSummary) session.get(UpdatablePostSummary.class, 1L);
        assertEquals(post.getName(), postSummary.getName());
        assertEquals(post.getName(), updatablePostSummary.getName());
        updatablePostSummary.setName("Hibernate Master Class Tutorial.");
    });
}
  1. The PostSummary is just a read-only View over your original entity, hence I annotated it with @Immutable.

  2. The UpdatablePostSummary is marked with @DynamicUpdate and so you can propagate changes from this View entity too.

This test is also available on GitHub.

  • What happens if you update an UpdatablePostSummary ? Will Post entity be updated to ? (Inside Hibernate I mean, obviously in database this is the same table). – Gaël J Aug 25 '16 at 8:22
  • 4
    In Hibernate, the Post entity will have to be refreshed manually, as otherwise Hibernate will not do it automatically. – Vlad Mihalcea Aug 25 '16 at 8:26

You have to add annotation @Entity,@Table(name="RESTAURANT") on your class, add annotations and replace your detailed mapping in hbm file by
.

Here a complete example: http://viralpatel.net/blogs/hibernate-many-to-many-annotation-mapping-tutorial/

  • That works for 'Restaurant' class. What about 'RestaurantLite'?? – Raj44 Mar 12 '15 at 11:06

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