18

I'm working in an ASP.NET webapi codebase where we rely heavily on the automatic support for JSON deserialization of message bodies into .NET objects via JSON.NET.

As part of building out patch support for one of our resources, I'd very much like to distinguish between an optional property in the JSON object that's not present, vs. that same property that's explicitly to null. My intention is to use the first for "don't change what's there" vs. "delete this thing."

Does anyone know if it's possible to mark up my C# DTOs so that when they're deserialized that JSON.NET can tell me which case it was? Right now they're just come up as null, and I can't tell why.

Conversely, if anyone can come up with a better design that doesn't require me to do it this way while still supporting the patch verb, I'd love to hear your proposal.

As a concrete example, consider this payload that would be passed to put:

{
  "field1": "my field 1",
  "nested": {
    "nested1": "something",
    "nested2": "else"
  }
}

Now, if I just wanted to update field1, I should be able to send this as an HTTP patch:

{
  "field1": "new field1 value"
}

and the nested values would remain untouched. However, if I sent this:

{
  "nested": null
}

I want to know this means I should explicitly remove the nested data.

  • Interesting. WCF data contracts / EmiteDefaultValue applied to WebAPI... Good call. – Brad Christie Mar 13 '15 at 5:40
18

If you use Json.Net's LINQ-to-JSON API (JTokens, JObjects, etc.) to parse the JSON, you can tell the difference between a null value and a field that simply doesn't exist in the JSON. For example:

JToken root = JToken.Parse(json);

JToken nested = root["nested"];
if (nested != null)
{
    if (nested.Type == JTokenType.Null)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("nested is set to null");
    }
    else
    {
        Console.WriteLine("nested has a value: " + nested.ToString());
    }
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("nested does not exist");
}

Fiddle: https://dotnetfiddle.net/VJO7ay

UPDATE

If you're deserializing into concrete objects using Web API, you can still use the above concept by creating a custom JsonConverter to handle your DTOs. The catch is that there needs to be a place on your DTOs to store the field status during deserialization. I would suggest using a dictionary-based scheme like this:

enum FieldDeserializationStatus { WasNotPresent, WasSetToNull, HasValue }

interface IHasFieldStatus
{
    Dictionary<string, FieldDeserializationStatus> FieldStatus { get; set; }
}

class FooDTO : IHasFieldStatus
{
    public string Field1 { get; set; }
    public BarDTO Nested { get; set; }
    public Dictionary<string, FieldDeserializationStatus> FieldStatus { get; set; }
}

class BarDTO : IHasFieldStatus
{
    public int Num { get; set; }
    public string Str { get; set; }
    public bool Bool { get; set; }
    public decimal Dec { get; set; }
    public Dictionary<string, FieldDeserializationStatus> FieldStatus { get; set; }
}

The custom converter would then use above LINQ-to-JSON technique to read the JSON for the object being deserialized. For each field in the target object, it would add an item to that object's FieldStatus dictionary indicating whether the field had a value, was explicitly set to null or did not exist in the JSON. Here is what the code might look like:

class DtoConverter : JsonConverter
{
    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
    {
        return (objectType.IsClass && 
                objectType.GetInterfaces().Any(i => i == typeof(IHasFieldStatus)));
    }

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        var jsonObj = JObject.Load(reader);
        var targetObj = (IHasFieldStatus)Activator.CreateInstance(objectType);

        var dict = new Dictionary<string, FieldDeserializationStatus>();
        targetObj.FieldStatus = dict;

        foreach (PropertyInfo prop in objectType.GetProperties())
        {
            if (prop.CanWrite && prop.Name != "FieldStatus")
            {
                JToken value;
                if (jsonObj.TryGetValue(prop.Name, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase, out value))
                {
                    if (value.Type == JTokenType.Null)
                    {
                        dict.Add(prop.Name, FieldDeserializationStatus.WasSetToNull);
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        prop.SetValue(targetObj, value.ToObject(prop.PropertyType, serializer));
                        dict.Add(prop.Name, FieldDeserializationStatus.HasValue);
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    dict.Add(prop.Name, FieldDeserializationStatus.WasNotPresent);
                }
            }
        }

        return targetObj;
    }

    public override bool CanWrite
    {
        get { return false; }
    }

    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

The above converter will work on any object that implements the IHasFieldStatus interface. (Note that you do not need to implement the WriteJson method in the converter unless you intend to do something custom on serialization as well. Since CanWrite returns false, the converter will not be used during serialization.)

Now, to use the converter in Web API, you need to insert it into the configuration. Add this to your Application_Start() method:

var config = GlobalConfiguration.Configuration;
var jsonSettings = config.Formatters.JsonFormatter.SerializerSettings;
jsonSettings.C‌​onverters.Add(new DtoConverter());

If you prefer, you can decorate each DTO with a [JsonConverter] attribute like this instead of setting the converter in the global config:

[JsonConverter(typeof(DtoConverter))]
class FooDTO : IHasFieldStatus
{
    ...
}

With the converter infrastructure in place, you can then interrogate the FieldStatus dictionary on the DTO after deserialization to see what happened for any particular field. Here is a full demo (console app):

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        ParseAndDump("First run", @"{
            ""field1"": ""my field 1"",
            ""nested"": {
                ""num"": null,
                ""str"": ""blah"",
                ""dec"": 3.14
            }
        }");

        ParseAndDump("Second run", @"{
            ""field1"": ""new field value""
        }");

        ParseAndDump("Third run", @"{
            ""nested"": null
        }");
    }

    private static void ParseAndDump(string comment, string json)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("--- " + comment + " ---");

        JsonSerializerSettings settings = new JsonSerializerSettings();
        settings.Converters.Add(new DtoConverter());

        FooDTO foo = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<FooDTO>(json, settings);

        Dump(foo, "");

        Console.WriteLine();
    }

    private static void Dump(IHasFieldStatus dto, string indent)
    {
        foreach (PropertyInfo prop in dto.GetType().GetProperties())
        {
            if (prop.Name == "FieldStatus") continue;

            Console.Write(indent + prop.Name + ": ");
            object val = prop.GetValue(dto);
            if (val is IHasFieldStatus)
            {
                Console.WriteLine();
                Dump((IHasFieldStatus)val, "  ");
            }
            else
            {
                FieldDeserializationStatus status = dto.FieldStatus[prop.Name];
                if (val != null) 
                    Console.Write(val.ToString() + " ");
                if (status != FieldDeserializationStatus.HasValue)
                    Console.Write("(" + status + ")");
                Console.WriteLine();
            }
        }
    }   
}

Output:

--- First run ---
Field1: my field 1 
Nested: 
  Num: 0 (WasSetToNull)
  Str: blah 
  Bool: False (WasNotPresent)
  Dec: 3.14 

--- Second run ---
Field1: new field value 
Nested: (WasNotPresent)

--- Third run ---
Field1: (WasNotPresent)
Nested: (WasSetToNull)

Fiddle: https://dotnetfiddle.net/xyKrg2

| improve this answer | |
  • Unfortunately that's not an option. Right now we're using the automatic WebAPI parameter binding/model binding stuff, which automatically serializes and deserializes types for us. Our project architect does not want to give up the reliability of guaranteed serialization without a significant show-stopper reason. This isn't one, unfortunately. – Chris Tavares Mar 13 '15 at 7:01
  • 1
    I've updated my answer with a solution that should work for Web API. Hope this helps. – Brian Rogers Mar 13 '15 at 20:08
  • Nice! I had started thinking of something along similar lines myself. – Chris Tavares Mar 13 '15 at 20:21
2

You could add some metadata to your JSON objects and (most likely) DTOs. It would require additional processing, but is pretty transparent and unambiguously accomplishes what you need (assuming you can name the new field such that you know it won't collide with actual data).

{
  "deletedItems": null,
  "field1": "my field 1",
  "nested": {
    "deletedItems": null,
    "nested1": "something",
    "nested2": "else"
  }
}
{
  "deletedItems": "nested",
  "field1": "new value",
  "nested": null
}

Alternatively, you could add an "isDeleted" property per field if your object model accommodates that better, but that sounds like a lot more work than a list of deleted fields.

| improve this answer | |
  • If you do go this route, I recommend using __fieldName to prevent (as best you can) colliding with an existing property. – Brad Christie Mar 13 '15 at 5:41
1

Looking through the Json.NET source, I found that it supports populating bool properties with a suffix of "Specified" to indicate whether or not the property was included in the data:

class MyClass
{
    public string Field1 { get; set; }

    public Nested Nested { get; set; }
    public bool NestedSpecified { get; set; }
}

class Nested
{
    public string Nested1 { get; set; }
    public string Nested2 { get; set; }
}

Input:

{
  "field1": "my field 1",
  "nested": {
    "nested1": "something",
    "nested2": "else"
  }
}

Resulting instance:

MyClass { Field1="my field 1", Nested=Nested { Nested1="something", Nested2="else" }, NestedSpecified=true }

Input:

{
  "field1": "new field1 value"
}

Resulting instance:

MyClass { Field1="new field1 value", Nested=null, NestedSpecified=false }

Input:

{
  "nested": null
}

Resulting instance:

MyClass { Field1=null, Nested=null, NestedSpecified=true }

I can't find this functionality in the Json.NET documentation but it looks like it has been there since 2010.

| improve this answer | |
  • This is a nice find. I have been working for Json.Net for years and I had no idea this feature was in there. Thanks for posting! +1 – Brian Rogers Apr 30 at 21:50
  • Wow, I also had no idea this was there! Not sure I want to rely on it if it's been undocumented for this long, makes me wonder what's wrong with it. :-) – Chris Tavares May 1 at 17:23
  • I did find one limitation with it while testing after posting this - it doesn't play well with constructor parameters. In the example above, if either nested or nestedSpecified are constructor parameters for MyClass then the value will always be false. – dcstraw May 2 at 15:09
0

I don't want to hijack this question but I posted a slightly different approach to this problem here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/31489835/1395758.

The approach is to replace the fields in your deserializable type with a struct that will automatically keep track of values (even null) through an IsSet property.

| improve this answer | |
0

The most elegant solution I came up with came to me in an epiphany:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using Newtonsoft.Json;
using Newtonsoft.Json.Linq;

namespace testJsonDeserializer
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // this operator has the password set to meow. 
            Operator originalOperator = new Operator
            {
                OperatorGuid = Guid.Parse("3bb1dc84-2963-4921-a567-fb2e7475623d"),
                UserName = "noortje@peterhuppertz.net",
                Password = "meow",
                PropertyThatWillBeNulled = "noortje@peterhuppertz.net",
            };

            // this json EXPLICITLY sets the PropertyThatWillBeNulled to null, but omits the Password property, making it null IMPLICITLY. 
            string json =
                "{ \"OperatorGuid\":\"3bb1dc84-2963-4921-a567-fb2e7475623d\", \"UserName\": \"noortje@peterhuppertz.net\", \"Email\": null }";
            // What a PATCH would want for the target object is to leave implicit Nulls unchanged, but explicit nulls set to null. 

            Operator patchedOperator = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Operator>(json);
            // At this stage, our patched operator has the password set to null. We do not want that; we want to keep whatever is stored in originalOperator

            Operator opToStore = MapJsonToOperator(patchedOperator, originalOperator, json);

            Console.WriteLine("Our patched operator:");
            Console.WriteLine($"Guid: {opToStore.OperatorGuid}");
            Console.WriteLine($"UserName: {opToStore.UserName}");
            Console.WriteLine($"Password: {opToStore.Password}");
            Console.WriteLine($"Email: {opToStore.PropertyThatWillBeNulled}");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        private static Operator MapJsonToOperator(Operator source, Operator original, string json)
        {
            Operator result = new Operator
            {
                OperatorGuid = source.OperatorGuid,
                UserName = source.UserName != null
                    // we check if the source property has a value, if so, we use that value.
                    ? source.UserName
                    // if it doesn't, we check the Json to see if the value is in there, explicitly set to NULL. If it is, we set it to NULL as well
                    : (IsNullValueExplicit(json, "UserName") ? null 
                        // if it is not in the json (making it implicitly null), we just leave the value as it was. 
                        : original.UserName),
                PropertyThatWillBeNulled = source.PropertyThatWillBeNulled != null
                    ? source.PropertyThatWillBeNulled
                    : (IsNullValueExplicit(json, "Email") ? null : original.PropertyThatWillBeNulled),
                Password = source.Password != null
                    ? source.Password
                    : (IsNullValueExplicit(json, "Password") ? null : original.Password),
            };

            return result;
        }

        static bool IsNullValueExplicit(string json, string fieldName)
        {
            JToken outer = JToken.Parse(json);
            JObject inner = outer.Value<JObject>();
            List<string> keys = inner.Properties().Select(p => p.Name).ToList();
            return keys.Contains(fieldName);
        }
    }

    public class Operator
    {
        public Guid OperatorGuid { get; set; }
        public string UserName { get; set; }
        public string Password { get; set; }
        public string PropertyThatWillBeNulled { get; set; }
    }
}

I know, there are a lot of comments in here. Maybe I overexplained... but I thought I'd err on the side of caution.

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